New 426 owner


7 replies to this topic
  • Ritten

Posted December 13, 2006 - 08:52 PM

#1

Well, I've just recently become the proud owner of a 2001 YZ426F that I picked up off a buddy of mine for $1700. The bike has been raced a good bit, but it runs like DA DEBIL and is smooth as silk once it's warm. It did sit up in his garage for most of the last year, so I was kinda worried about what I may need to do to it, but for now I'm just going to run it at the local spillway to get used to it. I've noticed a blown seal on the forks, so that's on the list to get changed as well as some springs for my weight while I've got the tubes apart. The bike will mostly be used for trails and some light sand so anything else I may need to look at changing, or suggested mods would be appreciated! Cheers.

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  • mudhog426

Posted December 13, 2006 - 09:11 PM

#2

Since the bikes been sitting, I'd probably grab a manual and go over everything. Basic tasks such as oil/filter change, air filter cleaning, cleaning and repacking swingarm / axle bearings come to mind. Checking the valve clearances and cam chain also make the list. Flushing the brake system and refilling with fresh fluid would be part of my routine also. All these things would help give you a great starting point in knowing where you stand as far as maintenance was concerned. Maintenance is critical to these bikes giving many years of enjoyment. 426's are great bikes, dang near bulletproof providing you do your part keeping them up to snuff. As far as mods are concerned, spend some time looking through these forums. Many mods have been listed, talked about and explained in detail by very knowledgeable riders. Happy trails:thumbsup:

  • torqueme

Posted December 13, 2006 - 11:51 PM

#3

Congrats Ritten-welcome to the club!! just a word from experience, if you continue to compress your forks that much when tying her down-you will probably continue to buy fork seals on a regular basis. i agree with mudhog, buy a manual & change out ALL yer fluids. see what comes out as your changing, thats the starting point. ride it & see what you want changed & go from there. lots of great info / people here...aloha

  • Ritten

Posted December 14, 2006 - 12:33 AM

#4

just a word from experience, if you continue to compress your forks that much when tying her down-you will probably continue to buy fork seals on a regular basis.



Thanks! I'm not new to bikes by any means, but this will be the first full on dirt bike that I've owned. I race a TL1000S at the local track and also have an Aprilia Futura, and a BMW R1200GS for the street. I've always tied down my bikes with the rule of compressing the forks about halfway and it has seemed to work with street machines. Not wanting hooks or straps to come loose when hitting a bump, is there a rule of thumb that makes it any different for the longer travel of a dirt bike?

I already have the service manual on order (I do almost ALL my own wrenching and tires) and will probably have everything apart and changed within the next month. In fact, I'm sponsoring a "wrenching day" at my house for the local adventure riders in the area. If anyone here lives around southern Louisiana you're welcome to stop by on Jan. 6th!!

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  • byggd

Posted December 14, 2006 - 04:55 AM

#5

To my knowledge compressing the forks does not build pressure so I don’t see how it can affect the seals. :thumbsup: That said, keeping them compresses for long periods is not good for the shock springs. :devil:

  • YZ426F Rider

Posted December 14, 2006 - 06:57 AM

#6

What Mudhog said. Probably want to throw some handguards on there if you are going to be trail riding or get some ASV levers. Other trail/offroad things to consider are radiator guards/braces and a good skidplate.

That fork seal might not be blown...might just have some dirt up in there that you can get out with a playing card or a strip cut from a tear-off.

Sounds like you've got some nice street bikes!

  • grayracer513

Posted December 14, 2006 - 09:16 AM

#7

... if you continue to compress your forks that much when tying her down-you will probably continue to buy fork seals on a regular basis.


To my knowledge compressing the forks does not build pressure so I don’t see how it can affect the seals. :thumbsup: That said, keeping them compresses for long periods is not good for the shock springs. :devil:

Compressing the fork compresses the air inside the fork as well. If the fork seals are marginal, or let's say, already weak, this may cause the seal to leak while tied down, and if the oil that gets between the oil seal and the dust seal is left there, it may appear to continue to leak.

But tying the bike down will not build up pressure in the fork in the way that riding it does. That is, when the fork is extended after being tied down for any length of time, the pressure will be no higher than it was when first tied down. When riding, air can work into the fork on the rebound strokes, increasing the amount of captive air in the fork, which does raise the internal pressure. Neither of these things will cause a seal to fail, but they may very well cause an already weak seal to be noticed.

I tie ours down like that all the time with no problems. The pressure developed by compressing the fork to half stroke is nothing compared to the pressure developed by a sudden 90% compression.

  • Yamaguy4Life

Posted December 14, 2006 - 01:06 PM

#8

They say that everyone in the world has an evil twin. I'm not sure which one of us is the good one.

Enjoy the bike.

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