WR security



17 replies to this topic
  • JohnL

Posted December 31, 2001 - 04:32 AM

#1

With a total lack of steering lock and ignition key, has anyone tried wiring in a hidden ignition interupt to add a bit of security to your bike?

John

  • Dodger

Posted December 31, 2001 - 05:20 AM

#2

I almost consider the "starting regiment" a sercurity device in itself, ever challanged a buddy to start your bike without giving him the low down? :) :D :D

Happy new year!

  • Lil_Bill

Posted January 09, 2002 - 06:35 PM

#3

hey John Sorry this took so long to answer but when I first bought the bike I put a hidden kill switch on the bike. It works great but believe me you don't want to forget which way is run for the switch, I learned the hard way in 100 degree weather.
I hid it under the seat right above the radiator overflow cap. i went to the local low volt electrical wholesale house and bought a marine toggle switch and put it in parallel with the original kill switch.

  • JohnL

Posted January 10, 2002 - 03:15 AM

#4

Thanks Lil Bill, I was coming to the same conclusion as you. I have also thought of putting a hidden kill switch in parallel with the low voltage feed to the coil, so will give it a try at the weekend.

  • YAMAKAZE

Posted January 10, 2002 - 04:28 AM

#5

Isn't that a pain in the butt to have to take your seat off everytime to set the switch or turn it off?

  • Jon_SWE

Posted January 11, 2002 - 01:11 AM

#6

I got a steering lock assembly whith my "street legal" kit From Yamaha!! it bolts on the lower tripel clamp and it works great!/Jon

  • UtahMotorcycleAdventures

Posted January 11, 2002 - 04:53 AM

#7

What's wrong with a $5 padlock on the front brake rotor? Unless they can pick up the whole bike, which they'd do no matter what locking mechanism you use, no one can ride or walk away with it.

  • Ron_in_SoCal

Posted January 11, 2002 - 07:59 AM

#8

I use a Kriptonite (sp?) motorcycle lock made for street bikes. It is intended to be placed on the front rotor, but put it over the chain on the rear sprocket so if someone tries to take off with it the rotor does not get damaged. I figure the sprocket is tougher and cheaper to replace.

  • lewichris

Posted January 11, 2002 - 08:22 AM

#9

get insurance If they want your bike they are going to get it.

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  • MOmilkman

Posted January 11, 2002 - 08:33 AM

#10

I second the Kryptonite Ron. I bought the lock and barbed wire cable that goes with it and there is no way anyone can take my bike.

Much simpler than installing a kill switch mechanisim. :)

  • WRoost

Posted January 11, 2002 - 10:16 PM

#11

Lewichris,

That's the best advice yet! I was scrolling down and was wondering when someone was going to suggest insurance. There IS a lot of good insurance out there. You just have to shop around.

  • yamaha.dude

Posted January 11, 2002 - 11:46 AM

#12

When you think about it, there are only a limited number of ways they can take your pride and Joy...


1. Ride it away... the opportunistic thief operates on this level. Never leave your bike running (because you don't want to have to start it again) while you run in for milk or a paper.

2. They will roll your bike onto a trailer/truck and if the front rotor is locked, they (two guys) will just pick up the front and roll it anyway... same if the back is locked... it might look funny to see two men rolling a bike on one wheel onto a truck/trailer, but who gets involved these days? Besides, when these f...kers do get caught, they spend their time in jail lifting weights... so they can lift your bike when they get out...

2A. They will pull up along side and lift it on a trailer... One of the favourite ways to snatch a Harley is to have a engine crane type lifter and just lift the bike straight onto the truck/trailer.

3. If it is chained to a street sign or post, then pro thieves will get it, even with chains, cables etc... they use cordless mini angle grinders to cut it free in say 30 secs and then use one of the above methods to spirit it away...

Caliper locks, toughend chains, pick-proof padlocks etc all help, but if they want your bike, the pro's will get it... they will wait until you leave home on a Friday night, they will follow you home on a Sunday afternoon... not to make you paranoid, just be aware... As with most crimes, if it is too hard, or takes too much time, or exposes them to being seen, caught etc, then they will move on to an easier target...

They will also take it out of your trailer while you are having dinner in the Burger king on the way home, sometimes they will take the whole trailer...

Insurance is really your best fallback - it is no defense against the bike being stolen, but at least you are not totally out of pocket... but check your policy... a lot of policies require that the bike be locked up, and that the insurance co. will wnat to see the police report that states the chain was cut/garage door busted open etc...

Good luck, as we all know, if there wasn't a market for these bikes, they would be stolen less... make sure of the credentials of your next secondhand bike purchase... someone might still be hoping it will come back home one day...

Also, watch your riding gear, tools etc... they all have value... Make sure you record the chassis & engine numbers, make sure you have pics of yor bike, and keep the reciepts for the accessories you buy for it...

Really, a big dog in the same yard as the bike is probably your best bet... and some sensor lights in front of your garage door...

I chain the bikes together with the wheel barrow etc..., at least if they want to lift them away, they have to lift 3 or 4 big bulky things at once... that takes some balancing... unless they cut the chain... so I keep my cutting tools in a different shed...

Be safe,

David

  • MOmilkman

Posted January 11, 2002 - 12:19 PM

#13

Originally posted by yamaha.dude:
Besides, when these f...kers do get caught, they spend their time in jail lifting weights... so they can lift your bike when they get out...

LMAO!!!! True!


If it is chained to a street sign or post, then pro thieves will get it, even with chains, cables etc... they use cordless mini angle grinders to cut it free in say 30 secs and then use one of the above methods to spirit it away...

Caliper locks, toughend chains, pick-proof padlocks etc all help, but if they want your bike, the pro's will get it... they will wait until you leave home on a Friday night, they will follow you home on a Sunday afternoon... not to make you paranoid, just be aware... As with most crimes, if it is too hard, or takes too much time, or exposes them to being seen, caught etc, then they will move on to an easier target...

They will also take it out of your trailer while you are having dinner in the Burger king on the way home, sometimes they will take the whole trailer...

Sounds like you know a little too much about this. Hmmmmmm,.... just kidding! :) :D :D

  • Ron_in_SoCal

Posted January 11, 2002 - 12:23 PM

#14

When 'ol blue is in the back of my truck, its locked to my heavy toolbox AND to the bed of the truck and will not be easy to remove. If two bikes are in the back of the truck, they are locked to each other and to the toolbox and to the truck bed. Always.

If they take it out of my garage when I'm not home, then my homeowners insurance will cover it (I checked). If they try to take it out of my garage when I am home, then my 12 gauge makes enough noise to scare anyone into thinking twice, most likely dropping everything and running for cover. No, I would not shoot someone for stealing my motorcycle, temping as it might be. One thing for sure - the police would be there in a hurry. No need for 911, let the neighbors handle that.

Good advice about documenting everything, vin numbers and the like, especially pictures. I agree with the statement: If they want it bad enough they will get it. That goes for anything and everything.

  • levy1

Posted January 11, 2002 - 02:07 PM

#15

I paid $2700.00 for my lock. I just couldn’t take it. First I bought a trailer for $600. I was always worried about the bike falling off or a car hitting the trailer. The big problem came when I would park in a motel. I would wake up 4 or 5 times to check the bike. I finally bought a long van. Easy to haul the bike, a great camper and the security of no one knowing what’s in there! Yes, I have insurance but I am really attached to this beauty.

  • yamaha.dude

Posted January 11, 2002 - 02:15 PM

#16

One other suggestion that I read here a short while ago was to have your bike in the garage, partly dissasembled... say the front and/or back wheel off... then they cannot roll it away so easy...

And just for MOMilkman's benefit, Yes, I have direct experience of this, but from the correct side of the equation... so don't worry, I am not the criminal mastersmind you might think... but a previous occupation gave me insight into Criminal Psychology...
(Unfortunately) Here in Australia, we don't really have the option of Rule 12G or Section 38 or 45 of the criminal apprehension code... :)

Just don't make it an easier for them... a big hi-tensile chain will be far less than the excees you will pay for the insurance claim...

David

[ January 11, 2002: Message edited by: yamaha.dude ]

[ January 11, 2002: Message edited by: yamaha.dude ]

  • Lil_Bill

Posted January 12, 2002 - 12:01 AM

#17

Hey Kaze, It is acccessible with out taking the seat off.
One other thing I do when I go camping besides the chain around the tree, I went to a gun shop and bought a gun lock and wrap it around & through the frame.
Kinda sounds stupid but it is an audible alarm on a cable lock. It has a motion detector and if the cable is cut it sounds a 110 decibel alarm.
only costs thirty bucks and the piece of mind is worth it.
Of course if all else fails I do have a ccw and am willing to use it. Not the gun I will just throw the license at the F____ER.

  • bonez34

Posted January 14, 2002 - 03:33 PM

#18

when we go to the woods to camp we just put beer bottles on the front tire so when it moves the bottle drops and hopefully wakes us up.




 
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