Bike Trailering


11 replies to this topic
  • Jack Roberge

Posted December 06, 2006 - 01:18 AM

#1

When I trailer my XR650L to the Baja from Canada I place a brace between the tires and the frame to eliminate spring stress. The problem I'm having is that the bike wiggles back and forth 1/2" while tied down in the trailer. This causes the braces between the tires and frame to wiggle out. I tried every way I could think to tie the bike down to eliminate this. The only way that works 100% is to apply ether the front or rear brake by tying or blocking them on. Does anyone know if having the brakes applied on for over a week while on the way down to the Baja will damage any part of the brake system?

  • creeky

Posted December 06, 2006 - 04:41 AM

#2

I have found that using tie-downs on the rear suspension as well as the front helps stabilize the bike.

  • Dan Turner

Posted December 06, 2006 - 10:44 AM

#3

Try letting the air out of the tires when you load/strap it down, and the add air back to the tires to get a tight connection. We've done this towing the jeeps before and it works well.

Just a thought.

-Dan

  • xrltim

Posted December 06, 2006 - 06:50 PM

#4

I personally would not tie either brake in the on position. Using tie down straps in the usual manner on the handlebars is best and like another person said, putting additional ones from the rear part of the frame. (not subframe) Pulling down part of the rear suspension works great, or you could go directly from the back wheel down to the trailer deck if you have that kind of trailer. You could go without blocks if you loosen the straps every day when you stop for the night, it won't hurt anything. Just leave a note on the steering wheel reminding yourself to tighten them back down when you get going again. I've gone on trips of a week or more without any problems with the fork seals.

  • Mudshark

Posted December 06, 2006 - 07:51 PM

#5

When I trailer my XR650L to the Baja from Canada I place a brace between the tires and the frame to eliminate spring stress. The problem I'm having is that the bike wiggles back and forth 1/2" while tied down in the trailer.


The only time I've had the bikes "rocking" forward and backwards like you
describe, is when the tie downs are not anchored far enough forward of the bike.
It's important that the trailer offers the correct securing geometry that is needed
to keep the bike firmly pulled up against the front of the trailer / wheel stop.
I don't really tie the back down other than using a bungee cord to keep the rear wheel
from maybe bouncing out of the track (it's never happened, even one time
when the trailer had a blowout and jackknifed around behind us a few times)
Try and find an anchor point father forward.... bolt or weld on a bit of
angle iron :worthy:
The suggestion of tying down flatish and pumping up after sounds like a good
one... give it a try first.

  • Jack Roberge

Posted December 06, 2006 - 11:12 PM

#6

Thanks for the replies. I have tried most of the suggestions without success. I did reposition my tie down trailer anchors as far forward as possible, I have had the front tie downs pulled so tight that the front tire was compressed half way to the rim, I do also tie down the rear of the bike and the bike still rocks back and forth. After rocking the bike back and forth by hand you can see the reason for the rocking is the front tire flexing in the front wheel chock. I normally have about 22 psi in the tire. I am going to increase that to about 40 psi and see if that helps. A rock hard tire shouldn't flex, I hope. Thanks for the idea.

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  • frankstr

Posted December 07, 2006 - 05:31 AM

#7

Thanks for the replies. I have tried most of the suggestions without success. I did reposition my tie down trailer anchors as far forward as possible, I have had the front tie downs pulled so tight that the front tire was compressed half way to the rim, I do also tie down the rear of the bike and the bike still rocks back and forth. After rocking the bike back and forth by hand you can see the reason for the rocking is the front tire flexing in the front wheel chock. I normally have about 22 psi in the tire. I am going to increase that to about 40 psi and see if that helps. A rock hard tire shouldn't flex, I hope. Thanks for the idea.


Do you ride with 22 psi in that front tire.....:worthy:

:D :prof:

  • Newxrowner

Posted December 07, 2006 - 08:47 AM

#8

Don't use the braces.... then you don't have to worry about them falling out. :worthy: Personally, I don't see any issues with compressing the suspension a few inches to stabilize the bike. I've been trailering bikes for many years this way, and have never had any problems.

  • creeky

Posted December 07, 2006 - 02:29 PM

#9

Don't use the braces.... then you don't have to worry about them falling out. :worthy: Personally, I don't see any issues with compressing the suspension a few inches to stabilize the bike. I've been trailering bikes for many years this way, and have never had any problems.


I agree. I tried the support between the tire and the fender when it first became the buzz, but quickly reverted to the old no brace method. If the brace falls out for any reason, you have a bike flopping all over the place.

  • lhark

Posted December 07, 2006 - 04:12 PM

#10

I use the UFO brace, and wouldn't go anywhere without it. If anything, the bike is more secure with the brace in place. I let the rear suspension move with the bumps, by using a soft tie around the top of the tire, and a tie down on each end, going down to the trailer, or pickup. This gives a bit more side to side stability, and will hold the bike up, if a front strap lets go, for any reason.
Now, if they only made trailers with long travel suspension, with shocks to absorb bumps right, we wouldn't have to worry about bikes being cinched down so tight.....JOGO

  • Jack Roberge

Posted December 07, 2006 - 11:38 PM

#11

Yes I ride with 22psi in my tires. I used to ride with lower air pressures but if there is a boulder sticking out of the ground I just have to run smack into it. There has been too many times where I had to slowly ride home or wost yet push the bike home with a pinched tube. With 22psi I can just bounce off of everything, although sometimes cornering can be quite an adventure.
I like the idea of using the brace for long trips, the bike will be tied down for a week. That seems like a long time to keep the suspension compressed, those fork springs don't last forever (after 4 years the springs on my Harley were sacked right out and I don't think Honda springs are any better). Locking ether brake on stops this rocking but I am concerned about locking the brake on for a week. Although my buddy said that ATVs have a brake lock built right in. I have to go to the bike shop and check out how they do it.

  • dukeryder

Posted December 08, 2006 - 12:27 AM

#12

I've trailered my L thousands of miles this past year (I've rode it even more miles) and had ZERO problems like you're having.

I went from New Orleans to MA via TN and I just used 4 tie downs and no brace. I went down to FL and used the Fork Brace and still had no probs. I have a Harbor Freight trailer and have a wheel chock on the front of the trailer. I use 4 RATCHETING tie-downs. Don't use those Cam-Lock junks "Motorcycle" tiedowns. They suck





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