rear shock adjustment


11 replies to this topic
  • thumper929

Posted November 20, 2006 - 07:14 AM

#1

how much rear sag should i have when sat on the bike?? its a 05 DRZ400S and i weigh 69kilos

if i need to adjust the spring preoad how do i do it?? cant get to the adj rings!

what did you guys do? take the shock out or what?



thanks in advance

  • rydnseek

Posted November 20, 2006 - 07:23 AM

#2

i take off the side shroud, then use a long punch or screwdriver to tap on the locknuts. You have to go by the gas cannister, but if you're careful, it will work. You should have ~ 4" of sag (100mm).. there are lots of good threads here for adjusting.. do a search on 'race sag' or set sag.. you'll find all you need.

I've tweaked my sag a few times.. the first time i set the back spring way too soft.. it was about 10.5" unloaded.. then i tightened it up to set a proper sag.. 9.75 on the spring, 3.875 race sag, 1.5" static sag. I thought it was too stiff for my easy riding style, so i softened it up again.. this time it's right at 10" for the spring. I'm sure the race sag is over 4".. but not much. It's not an exact science.. it does depend on what your riding style is, the terrain, etc. You can just keep tweaking it & try to find the best balance... as long as it's within a reasonable range of the specs!

  • hodgkins

Posted November 20, 2006 - 07:32 AM

#3

Put it up on a stand 1st.From the right side use a long punch or screwdriver and loosen the upper lock ring.A lot of adjustment can be made by simply turning the spring by hand in the direction of preload you want.The lower lock ring will usually turn with the spring.When the resistance is too great to turn by hand I go around to the left side and use a long screw driver or punch.

  • thumper929

Posted November 20, 2006 - 10:19 AM

#4

i take off the side shroud, then use a long punch or screwdriver to tap on the locknuts. You have to go by the gas cannister, but if you're careful, it will work. You should have ~ 4" of sag (100mm).. there are lots of good threads here for adjusting.. do a search on 'race sag' or set sag.. you'll find all you need.

I've tweaked my sag a few times.. the first time i set the back spring way too soft.. it was about 10.5" unloaded.. then i tightened it up to set a proper sag.. 9.75 on the spring, 3.875 race sag, 1.5" static sag. I thought it was too stiff for my easy riding style, so i softened it up again.. this time it's right at 10" for the spring. I'm sure the race sag is over 4".. but not much. It's not an exact science.. it does depend on what your riding style is, the terrain, etc. You can just keep tweaking it & try to find the best balance... as long as it's within a reasonable range of the specs!


Put it up on a stand 1st.From the right side use a long punch or screwdriver and loosen the upper lock ring.A lot of adjustment can be made by simply turning the spring by hand in the direction of preload you want.The lower lock ring will usually turn with the spring.When the resistance is too great to turn by hand I go around to the left side and use a long screw driver or punch.


good thinking! i hadnt even considered loosinging the lock ring then just trying to turn the spring by hand!! :cheers:

cheers guys ,i will give it a go as it deffo feels very soft, esp off road! now that my confidence is growing and im riding her harder :p

  • thumper929

Posted November 20, 2006 - 11:17 AM

#5

i set/measure the rear sag with me sat on the bike :cheers:


right? :p

  • rydnseek

Posted November 20, 2006 - 11:33 AM

#6

thumper: right. measure your first distance with the bike on a stand, then the next with you geared up. The difference is the race sag. Then measure it empty.. off the stand. This is static sag. race should be around 4", static should be around 1.5".

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  • thumper929

Posted November 21, 2006 - 12:02 AM

#7

thumper: right. measure your first distance with the bike on a stand, then the next with you geared up. The difference is the race sag. Then measure it empty.. off the stand. This is static sag. race should be around 4", static should be around 1.5".



thankyou :cheers:

  • CsHoSi

Posted November 21, 2006 - 05:29 AM

#8

Have you browsed through the Technical Articles section? A lot of great stuff there, I hate to say it but I haven't set mine yet.

When I finally get my act together, I will follow this article, Set Your Sag.

  • y2blade

Posted December 08, 2006 - 03:44 AM

#9

ive just set mine....easy

24.5 free
22.5 under its own weight
20.5 with me sat on it all geared up in boots and helmet

free length of the spring is 10inch and i weigh 69 kilos

  • NewZooki

Posted April 09, 2007 - 09:53 PM

#10

Gentelmen!

Not to highjack this thread, but since it's on rear shock adjustment, I have some information gaps in reading the shop manual for compression and rebound damping adjustment,

The manual, way in the back in the specs, indicates 3 damping adjustments: compression high-speed, compression low-speed, and rebound.

In chassis section of the manual, where the actual work with the shock is discussed, only one adjustment is mentioned and it does not exactly jive with what is mentioned in the back of the manual.

Can someone please point out where the 3 damping adjustment points are on the shock? I have an '06 DRZ-S.

Thanks!

  • William1

Posted April 10, 2007 - 02:05 AM

#11

There is a small screw at the bottom of the shock, on the side of the clevis, this is the rebound adjuster. To adjust, screw in all the way (gently till it stops), OEM setting is 14 clicks out.
On the side of the res, are a blue nut with a screw in the middle. These are the compression adjusters. The blue nut is the high speed. To adjust, screw it all the way in. OEM setting is 1-1/8 turns out. The small screw is the low speed adjuster. To adjust, screw it all the way in, OEM setting is 10 clicks out.

Forgive me for stating this, but the high speed and low speed adjustments does not directly correlate to how fast you are going rather to the speed the shock is working. For example, a washboard surface when you are traveling quickly will really work the shock and the high speed adjuster will have a greater effect. The same surface riding slow will involve the low speed one more. A gently undulating surface riding slowly may not inccur any shock movement, whereas riding the same surface fast may only work the low speed compression. Makes sense?

  • fastgun

Posted April 10, 2007 - 06:27 AM

#12

Thing that helped me the most was the realization that there is NOT a single one correct setting that I must attain. There is a correct range that the suspension should be in. When within that range, I can set it to suit me.

I prefer to pull my rear shock off and set the spring with a couple of trial and errors. Takes a little more time this way, but it is a lot more gentle on the shock. Plus, I can use a couple of larger wrenches to be certain the lock ring is tight. Once it is set, I tend to leave it there forever, or until the next rear end tear down and since I measured the length of the spring under compression, it is easy to get it set back again if I disassemble the shock.





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