Stupid Hurts The Wallet!


17 replies to this topic
  • 02YZ426

Posted November 13, 2006 - 07:15 PM

#1

Yep.. I pulled a stupid. Despite all the posts about dry linkage bearings from the factory, I didn't make the time to take mine apart and grease it up. Now I pay LoL. What else is new:bonk: Got somewhat lucky , swingarm and shock bearings are ok. I made the discovery tonight when I went to move the bike around in the garage.. the back end wouldn't even budge. Could have something to do with my nice new powerfull powerwasher + bike sitting for a month. Well, just thought I would share... Everyone have a nice day:thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted November 13, 2006 - 07:25 PM

#2

Now if only it were possible for most people to actually learn from your mistake. :cheers:

  • 02YZ426

Posted November 13, 2006 - 08:23 PM

#3

I figured I could get away with it... go over everything once the racing season was over. Nope.. better not wait that long! Now, don't think I abuse and neglect my bike.. cause its well looked after. All other maintenance is done regular.. but I hate messing with those linkages.

http://i2.photobucke.../DSC_0031-3.jpg

  • Ga426owner

Posted November 14, 2006 - 05:40 AM

#4

It is easy...it just takes time
next time grease that baby up!:cheers:

  • 02YZ426

Posted November 14, 2006 - 02:41 PM

#5

It is easy...it just takes time
next time grease that baby up!:cheers:


Yeah its easy... if the rollers don't all fall out on ya!

  • grayracer513

Posted November 14, 2006 - 03:01 PM

#6

Well actually, that's one of the differences in the '06 and the earlier models; they finally ditched the "string cheese". :cheers: The swing arm bearings are held in place by their races the same as before, but the linkage rollers are no longer captive in the oil-impregnated plastic cage, so they do fall out. Be ready.

  • tnl

Posted November 14, 2006 - 03:30 PM

#7

Now if only it were possible for most people to actually learn from your mistake. :cheers:


As I read this thread mainly the above response I find myself looking for a time where I can complete this task knowing dam well that it needs to be done because I never did a tear down on my new bike in 05. I then go outside and look at the swingarm and the linkage that needs to be re-greased and guess at how much time and tools and know how it is gonna take and I start to tell myself maybe it can wait? All the bike maintenance that I do is a learn as you go/ hands on experience (except the little stuff) so I tend to get a little discouraged at routine maintenance procedures that may or may not need to be done for the next ride. I guess I really should take the above advise right? Are there any warning signs that the bearing is going bad? Any quick tips or advise that are not in my owners manual would be appreciated. Also, anyone know who posted a thread about doing a complete teardown? Was it a motoman 393 website thread?

  • 02YZ426

Posted November 14, 2006 - 03:42 PM

#8

My bearing went without warning! Last ride out they were great.. no squeaking, no play. I took the bike home washed it up.. 1 month of sitting and the rear suspension was froze solid. I mean, I could jump on the thing.. and nothing!

  • grayracer513

Posted November 14, 2006 - 03:45 PM

#9

If you mean a tear down of the swing arm/linkage, here you go:

http://www.thumperfaq.com/swingarm.htm

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  • 02YZ426

Posted November 14, 2006 - 04:02 PM

#10

Hey grayracer... do you think the bearings this year are better without the plastic cage? I know there is a ton of extra rollers now without it. I was looking at the ALL Balls aftermarket linkage kit.. but not sure wether they use the cage or not. Do you think it matters?

  • grayracer513

Posted November 14, 2006 - 04:18 PM

#11

The plastic was less a cage than a lube system. It was porous, and cooked in oil, and was the single source of all lubricant in that bearing. It doesn't really displace a significant number of bearing rollers because of the space it occupied, as there is very little material between rollers. As a lube system, it was fine until it got dirty or wet. Then, it is really not cleanable or greaseable in any practical way. The newer type is only better because it can be completely disassembled and cleaned and re-lubed without the extra hassle. If you service the old type, dig the rollers out of the plastic and discard it, as the web page shows.

  • tnl

Posted November 14, 2006 - 04:26 PM

#12

Thanks Gray! Great link!! I feel more at ease after reading all the data at that site.

  • yamahacrazy_310

Posted November 15, 2006 - 08:08 AM

#13

Maybe I should do mine. I got mine back in march and havnt done it yet.

  • Ga426owner

Posted November 15, 2006 - 08:34 AM

#14

Yeah its easy... if the rollers don't all fall out on ya!


agreed....patience and very careful handling is key at this point....otherwise :cheers:

  • motoclay

Posted November 16, 2006 - 07:54 PM

#15

Just FYI, to keep those needles from flying all over, push the inner race out half way out of the bearing, then put some grease on all of the needles, just kinda pack it in with your finger, then go ahead and push the inner race the rest of the way out and you can finish packing, then shove the race back in wipe of the excess grease, clean the seal washer and re install. I made the mistake when my first bike was new and pulled the race all the way and needles fell everywhere. The grease acts as a glue, and it works fantastic. Oh, btw, if u do lose a couple out of the bearing, and u think u have found them all, take a pocket screw driver and try gently to go between two needles, if it goes in, u are still missing one. IN AN EXTREME CASES, u can cut a drill bit that is the exact size of the needles to get you back rippin. Bad thing is with that, u usually only have one bit that size. And u may get two needles out of it, but, i have been doin this at friday night before we go ride, and for some reason or another u need one new needle, its a way out and really, it will last as long as the rest because its hardend like the needles. Hope these few ideas help. (ALL INFO IS OF MY OPINION AND EXPERIENCE ONLY!!)

  • darmino

Posted November 26, 2006 - 06:27 PM

#16

I knew when I got my 06 I should have greased the linkage before the first ride but I was impatient and I blew it off. 44hrs of track time later and after reading your post I made time to tear down the linkage and see if there was any damage. I was surprised to see plenty of grease on all of the linkage bearings and no problems anywhere.I cleaned out their grease and replaced it with redline C3 pure synthetic waterproof grease only because I was already in there but it was not necessary. I know this is not normal and I was extremely lucky, Also during my very first oil change I found almost no metal chips trapped on the oil filter and have only found very few of the typical small flakes during the following oil changes. This is not what I found on my 02 wr426, during its first oil change there where metal flakes and aluminum chips everwhere. It took about three oil changes to get all the debris out.It seems that this has no effect on the reliability of the Yamaha engine which currently has over 15000 miles. Maybe who ever assembled my 06 bike was just promoted and full of company pride and decided to really clean the case and lube the bearings during assemble. Lucky me!

  • Kyle Prior

Posted November 26, 2006 - 06:42 PM

#17

As I read this thread mainly the above response I find myself looking for a time where I can complete this task knowing dam well that it needs to be done because I never did a tear down on my new bike in 05. I then go outside and look at the swingarm and the linkage that needs to be re-greased and guess at how much time and tools and know how it is gonna take and I start to tell myself maybe it can wait? All the bike maintenance that I do is a learn as you go/ hands on experience (except the little stuff) so I tend to get a little discouraged at routine maintenance procedures that may or may not need to be done for the next ride. I guess I really should take the above advise right? Are there any warning signs that the bearing is going bad? Any quick tips or advise that are not in my owners manual would be appreciated. Also, anyone know who posted a thread about doing a complete teardown? Was it a motoman 393 website thread?



I have had the same attitude as you, and now my motor is out of the bike being rebuilt... Costing me $550 in parts are least..

  • Matt96xr6

Posted November 26, 2006 - 08:29 PM

#18

yup. this is why you tear the bike down to the frame before your first ride. I dont even start my bikes when I pick them up at the dealer. THis is an overview of what I do in general:

Grease all bearings - wheels, linkage, swingarm, shock and steering head. ALso you can remove the throttle cam in the carb and grease those needle bearings also.

Grease all the slide pins in the brakes.

flush all the fluids and start fresh - brakes, gas, engine oil, fork oil, coolant.

check the valves (then you also have a starting measurement)

jet the carb, check the float level and install longer fuel screw

lube all the cables (throttle, hotstart and lube the plunger with grease, clutch)

adjust the chain (I install an aftermarket one, never run the stocker)

install aftermarket parts

adjust the bars, levers and brake pedal for personal preference

wire tie front brake line, grips and anything else required



All my bikes are torn down to the frame, top end removed, clutch removed and then rebuilt with aftermarket parts before even riding. Never had a bearing problem yet. Yes they do go out (ie wheels bearings), but no frozen linkages!





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