01 426 chews up rear tires!


41 replies to this topic
  • grayracer513

Posted November 13, 2006 - 07:12 PM

#21

The terrain for which the tire is built is what the "hard/soft" is in reference to, not the rubber compound used to make it.

  • whyzee426F

Posted November 13, 2006 - 08:14 PM

#22

The terrain for which the tire is built is what the "hard/soft" is in reference to, not the rubber compound used to make it.


Roger...but one would think that a tire made for soft terrain would not hold up to the abuse the desert would inflict upon it...so it must not be "soft."

So I'm wondering now if that tire holds up, and it is supposed to be made for mud, I'm waisting my time researching this and should just go buy the cheapest tire with the nastiest looking knobs available...?

  • grayracer513

Posted November 13, 2006 - 09:37 PM

#23

That strategy would probably not yield the results you'd hope for. Simply and generally, hard surface knobbies have larger blocks spaced closer together so that there is more rubber in contact with the hard surface. Hard ground often doesn't allow the tire to dig into it very deeply, so traction depends more on the number of edges biting at the ground and on the friction of the increased contact area.

Tires made for loose, relatively insubstantial soils like sand, mud, or loose loam need the knobs made smaller, almost spike-like, so the weight of the bike will drive them into the surface as deeply as possible, and spaced far apart so that it drives against a larger chunk of dirt. Intermediates are in between these two.

Either type of tire can be made well, of high quality, durable materials, or cheaply of stuff that shreds and tears away in the rocks. If a soft tire is used only in sand or mud with no hard stuff or rocks around, it could be soft and pliable and it wouldn't matter. But in the real world, if the knobs are too hard, they tend to break or tear off in rocky sections. Too soft and they squirm uncontrollably on hard ground. The best are usually a blend, with harder rubber outside, and progressively tougher, more resilient stuff underneath.

So on the contrary, your research is the only way you'll find what you want short of trying every tire made for yourself. Keep looking. The thing to remember is that the best choice usually ends up having little to do with price one way or the other.

  • xnofriendsx

Posted November 14, 2006 - 09:21 AM

#24

About the IRC M5B. My brother uses it on his WR426 so that may be another reason why it is lasting so long. It is all stock and when you give that bike some throttle it is nowhere the power of what my YZ426 has. So less tire spin i would think, plus he is a super mellow rider.
But like Grayracer said, it is a soft tire and has a sort of spike look to the knobbies and are spaced apart. The funny thing is that we ride pretty hard ground stuff and it is holding up well.

Grayracer...
I just bought another set of Dunlop 952 front/rear ($100 for both, deal).
My last set was 120/90/19, but my local store recommended a 110/90/19 with my 2002 YZ426 with Excel wheels due to less "ballooning" of the tire, hence more traction.
The 120 would tend to pull in the side knobbies a bit more creating less total surface area.
It sounded right, but just wanted your opinion.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 14, 2006 - 11:22 AM

#25

I just bought another set of Dunlop 952 front/rear ($100 for both, deal).
My last set was 120/90/19, but my local store recommended a 110/90/19 with my 2002 YZ426 with Excel wheels due to less "ballooning" of the tire, hence more traction.
The 120 would tend to pull in the side knobbies a bit more creating less total surface area.
It sounded right, but just wanted your opinion.

It depends on the rim size the 120 was made for. YZ250F's have 1.85 wide rims in the rear, and are set up to use a 110/90x19. Most 110/90x19's are built for 2.15 wide rims, so when you use the larger tire, the beads are pulled closer together than was intended, and the tire takes on a rounder shaped than it was supposed to have. That's not always a bad thing, but that's what they were saying.

However, many 120/90x19's, the Maxxis IT included, are made for a suggested rim size of 2.15 (this is listed in most of the tire catalogs, or on the manufacturer's web site), which is the same as most 110/90's, and they mount up looking like they were supposed to because of it. But a larger rear tire can make a bike less willing to turn in because the outer edges are out farther, and they are heavier. Additionally, the soil surface a tire was built for often influences the shape. Hard surface tires tend to be rounder to accommodate better cornering on packed soils, while soft terrain types often have flatter profiles with fewer side knobs to catch at the sides of ruts.

While I like the 110 better overall, I like a 120 in the desert for the extra pinch protection and better flotation and traction in sand. Most of them will fit your bike correctly.

  • DrThumper

Posted November 14, 2006 - 12:08 PM

#26

When I got my '01 YZ (and lived in SouCal) I had the same dilemma. Tried everything...Dunlops, Michelins, etc. Now I'm not currently up to date with the Desert IT, but the standard Maxxis IT is my current favorite...more miles on it than any Dunlop. I tried Michelins once, didn't last long and their sizing is goofy. Maxxis IT 120, the best thing going IMO.

  • whyzee426F

Posted November 14, 2006 - 06:14 PM

#27

This has turned out to be a very informative thread...thanks to all for taking the time, especially grayracer513! :cheers:

  • whyzee426F

Posted February 19, 2007 - 10:19 AM

#28

To close the loop on this thread, here's what I did:

Decided to try the Maxxis Maxcross Desert IT in the stock size, which is 110/90/19.

After about 5 hours of riding, two of which were on a track, the rest being in the desert in various conditions to include sand, steep rocky hills, and hard pack, I've concluded the Maxxis Desert IT tire is fantastic!

I'm really glad I bought it. The only drawback I can see to the tire is that it is heavier than a standard MX tire, and more difficult to mount, but the weight really isn't a factor for me because I'm not a pro who'll be racing on an MX track.

I'll bring this thread up again after about 10 rides and report on durability.

Thanks again for all the input.

  • grayracer513

Posted February 19, 2007 - 05:45 PM

#29

Next, try a Dunlop 952.

  • xnofriendsx

Posted February 20, 2007 - 09:19 AM

#30

To close the loop on this thread, here's what I did:

Decided to try the Maxxis Maxcross Desert IT in the stock size, which is 110/90/19.

After about 5 hours of riding, two of which were on a track, the rest being in the desert in various conditions to include sand, steep rocky hills, and hard pack, I've concluded the Maxxis Desert IT tire is fantastic!

I'm really glad I bought it. The only drawback I can see to the tire is that it is heavier than a standard MX tire, and more difficult to mount, but the weight really isn't a factor for me because I'm not a pro who'll be racing on an MX track.

I'll bring this thread up again after about 10 rides and report on durability.

Thanks again for all the input.


Hey, how difficult are teh Maxxis Desert IT's to put on. I ride a lot of Maxxis DH tires when i ride mountain bikes and they are crazy difficult for a moutain bike tire. I heard the same with the MX tires.
Just curious. I ride the Dunlop 952's and they are great, but i am always down to try a new tire and have wanted to try those Maxxis Desert IT's.
Do you run those on front and rear?

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  • Slinkyman16

Posted February 20, 2007 - 09:39 AM

#31

i have ran the maxxis it tire for some time now. i love it.. great traction and durabilty.. i have it on my 02 426 and my 250.. both been on for a more then a year and its just now starting to show alot of wear... i have a stock 110 on the back tho.. i ride desert pretty much all the time.. stoddard valley

  • grayracer513

Posted February 20, 2007 - 10:39 AM

#32

The Desert IT is a heavier version of the IT, as if it needed to be heavier. I find the 952 to wear as well as the IT, and that it hooks up better in a wider range of soil conditions. It also corners significantly better, and transitions between hooked up and sliding in a much more predictable and controllable manner. It's also easier to mount, and quite a bit lighter. The 952 is a little more subject to tearing in the rocks, though.

I was not happy with the IT front we tried at all. It didn't hook up well, and rounded off too fast.

  • xnofriendsx

Posted February 20, 2007 - 11:30 AM

#33

Yeah, i rode up at Deer Creek and my 952 got pretty shredded in the rocky (lava rock) sections. But otherwise it is great like you said.
I might try the Desert IT next just for fun. That is if i can mount the tire.

  • whyzee426F

Posted February 20, 2007 - 07:15 PM

#34

Hey, how difficult are teh Maxxis Desert IT's to put on. I ride a lot of Maxxis DH tires when i ride mountain bikes and they are crazy difficult for a moutain bike tire. I heard the same with the MX tires.
Just curious. I ride the Dunlop 952's and they are great, but i am always down to try a new tire and have wanted to try those Maxxis Desert IT's.
Do you run those on front and rear?


The desert IT was very difficult to put on. In fact, first time around gave me so much trouble I pinched the tube.

I still have the factory Dunlop on the front but am looking to change it out. Not sure what I'll use, especially since grayracer recommends against and we're in same riding conditions.

  • whyzee426F

Posted March 20, 2007 - 06:51 PM

#35

The Desert IT is a heavier version of the IT, as if it needed to be heavier. I find the 952 to wear as well as the IT, and that it hooks up better in a wider range of soil conditions. It also corners significantly better, and transitions between hooked up and sliding in a much more predictable and controllable manner. It's also easier to mount, and quite a bit lighter. The 952 is a little more subject to tearing in the rocks, though.

I was not happy with the IT front we tried at all. It didn't hook up well, and rounded off too fast.



Grayracer,

So which front tire would you recommend?

I'm now looking to replace the stock Dunlop 739D front and don't like it almost as much as I didn't like the 739D back tire.

Thanks!

  • grayracer513

Posted March 20, 2007 - 07:04 PM

#36

I like the D745, D952, or Bridgestone M401, in that order.

  • whyzee426F

Posted March 20, 2007 - 07:21 PM

#37

I like the D745, D952, or Bridgestone M401, in that order.


I can't seem to find a 745. Found 742 intermediate and 755 soft terrian tires, and the 952.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 21, 2007 - 07:33 AM

#38

The 745 is so new that it's still not on the web site. It's much better than a 742, which I didn't really care for very much. The 755 is a soft terrain tire, and won't work well as an all around for SoCal.

  • Tau

Posted March 21, 2007 - 09:32 AM

#39

try fitting 110/19 Maxxis IT with 140 bib mouse. You get mad and give up and usually takes you more than :eek: 1 loop of the watch. However I would not use any other tyre :applause: in the desert or dunes or forest as I can go anywhere and I cannot remember getting punctures when I take my mooses out between races. I believe ythat the tyre has great feel and durability for 400km:thumbsup: plus races.

OH I found a way to fit the mooses easier. Buy HTS silicone grease and rub the sidewalls of the tyre and the moose drench it. this way the tyre slips on. Be careful the levers will also slip now.

  • ____Kurt____

Posted March 21, 2007 - 11:47 AM

#40

i have a carlsebad and millville 120/90-19's comming in tomarrow. im not sure which one i should mount first though. can you really feel the difference between a 110 and a 120?





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