Chain riveting tool


6 replies to this topic
  • BajaFool

Posted October 26, 2006 - 06:32 PM

#1

Well it looks like, in the quest for ever advanced technology, the chain manufacturers have come up with a scheme to force us to spend additional funds to join the two ends of our chains together. For the past several years new motorcycles have been equipped with riveted master links versus the old style master link with a circlip. A person wouldn't give much thought to this situation until it is time to purchase a new chain. New chains come with the new style riveted master link. In order to install the new and improved riveted master link, if you are a "do-it-yourselfer", you have to purchase a master link riveting tool. There are only a few of these on the market, after doing a quick search on the Internet, and they are pricey. Motion Pro sells one for $125 and RK Chain sells one for $100. Deals are available, however. The Motion Pro can be purchased for $85 on line and from some dealers locally. This still is a lot of money for a specialty tool that is used once every few years. A good oring chain should last for 3,000-4,000 miles. Dealers charge $20 and up to rivet on a new master link. At an average of 2,000 miles of riding in a year, the average rider would not amortize a purchase price for this type of tool of even $85 dollars over a span of 8-10 years when compared to taking the bike to a mechanic and paying to have the master link installed. However, I want to do it myself. So, does anyone have a suggestion for a source and brand name of an inexpensive master link riveting tool?

  • Indy_WR450

Posted October 26, 2006 - 06:55 PM

#2

Only cheap solution is to buy a master link with a clip for your new chain.
I have the RK chain break and riveting tool for 520/530 chains and it is a very good quality unit that will last for years. I need it for my R1 so I buy rivet master style chains for my dirt bikes as well. Old school but very reliable compared to the clip.:mad:

  • WR_Dave

Posted October 26, 2006 - 07:26 PM

#3

Have a few friends chip in for half so they can use it when they need a chain. WR Dave.

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  • ncampion

Posted October 26, 2006 - 08:21 PM

#4

Just use a master link with a clip. I can't remember when I had a clip type master link fail.

  • Gadsen

Posted October 26, 2006 - 08:46 PM

#5

I ground my new chain apart when I bought the bike new and installed a clip type master link. These will work great as long as you keep a few things in mind. First, the clip must go on only one way, second, as the ends of the master link pins wear down from the chain blocks/guides, replace the master link. And if you do remove the clip, replace it with new as soon as you can.

  • Chasejj

Posted October 26, 2006 - 09:27 PM

#6

I ground my new chain apart when I bought the bike new and installed a clip type master link. These will work great as long as you keep a few things in mind. First, the clip must go on only one way, second, as the ends of the master link pins wear down from the chain blocks/guides, replace the master link. And if you do remove the clip, replace it with new as soon as you can.


I have had master clips that I caught before they failed(they were close). TMD and other chain guides that flex around and rub the sides of the chain can doi it. I recently put a new chian on and used my DID rivet tool. It really is a nice way to go and gives good peace of mind. I can't fathom needing to take apart a DID X ring chain in the field anymore. They are just bulletproof.I for one will not miss the master link.

  • waynus

Posted October 27, 2006 - 03:01 AM

#7

When you need a new chain, why not take your swingarm off and regrease and check everything and at the same time rivet your chain in your garage using a block of steel and a punch to splay the rivets. Viola et au reservoir.:mad:




 
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