06 XR650R Skid plate


24 replies to this topic
  • ThunderChicken

Posted October 21, 2006 - 11:25 PM

#21

WOW. posted yesterday morning and havent been able to get back. What a great response with lots of good advise.:mad:

My skid plate broke just in front of the right foot peg. On that narrow part and it snaped completely in half. I have only had the bike for 3 weeks and it broke the first week I got it!:mad:

Any how I ride in the desert out side of Phoenix mostly down by the coke ovens and up north of Superior. Fairly rocky country.
I have cased it a few times already and have just gotten it broke in :mad:


Casing it isn't the problem. The frame can handle getting widdled away at the rails without any adverse side effects. I have a 2003 with 4 years of desert races and me picking lines like a skateboarder grinds a street curb to prove it. The frame rails and points below the perches look like they have been through a combination cheese grater and sand blaster but they are still there.

What you want to protect is the front of the engine and the sides. IMO, the stock skid plate is perfect in this role.

By running an aftermarket skid plate you:

1. add cost
2. add weight
3. amplify engine noise
4. make oil changes a PIA which could lead to less changes if we are speaking in real world terms

And most importantly, while it has been a topic of constant depate on this board for a number of years, an alu. skid plate creates undo stresses on the frame that contribute to cracking and failure.

Every guy I race with who used an alu. skid plate on his 650 has cracked a frame. When I started racing the 650, I thought that replacing a failed frame would be one of the first costly repairs...never happened. You can write it off as antecdotal but I know what I've seen.

The 2003 is on it's second modified right peg perch, tons of oil filter covers (every strike above any line afforded by alu. plates), three subframes hanging in my rafters, four sets of rims, two holed clutch covers (again, both strikes coming from above), 3 sets of radiators, and of course, the usual "wearables." ...but the frame is still there.

  • eastreich

Posted October 23, 2006 - 06:10 AM

#22

Casing it isn't the problem. The frame can handle getting widdled away at the rails without any adverse side effects. I have a 2003 with 4 years of desert races and me picking lines like a skateboarder grinds a street curb to prove it. The frame rails and points below the perches look like they have been through a combination cheese grater and sand blaster but they are still there.

What you want to protect is the front of the engine and the sides. IMO, the stock skid plate is perfect in this role.

By running an aftermarket skid plate you:

1. add cost
2. add weight
3. amplify engine noise
4. make oil changes a PIA which could lead to less changes if we are speaking in real world terms

And most importantly, while it has been a topic of constant depate on this board for a number of years, an alu. skid plate creates undo stresses on the frame that contribute to cracking and failure.

Every guy I race with who used an alu. skid plate on his 650 has cracked a frame. When I started racing the 650, I thought that replacing a failed frame would be one of the first costly repairs...never happened. You can write it off as antecdotal but I know what I've seen.

The 2003 is on it's second modified right peg perch, tons of oil filter covers (every strike above any line afforded by alu. plates), three subframes hanging in my rafters, four sets of rims, two holed clutch covers (again, both strikes coming from above), 3 sets of radiators, and of course, the usual "wearables." ...but the frame is still there.


I disagree with two of the statements above. The first one is the grinding down of the frame rails. This is detrimental to the long term life span of the frame. Any small crease or edge in aluminum creates a stress point in the material that will allow for inclusions in the grain structure to oxidize and weaken the frame rails.

As for an aluminum skid plate causing frames to crack, that is not true, WHEN they are properly mounted. Most aluminum skid plates mount wiht steel brackets over the frame rails. Case it enough and the plate will slowly slide backwards on the frame. The steel brackets will gouge into the softer aluminum frame rails and create the stress points that I mentioned above.

If you want to test this theory on something, put a good sized notch in some old 7/8" aluminum handlebars and go pound through whoops at 80 mph. Before too long, they WILL fail. And they will fail at the notch.

I have been racing on my 2001 650R since the day it came home. In fact its' break in ride was a Nat'l H&H in Murphy, Idaho. I also race it in the Vet Pro class in my local motocross races and add the "extreme stress" of inverted forks to my frame. The area Honda factory rep even told me that it was a good idea for me (at my size) to have the inverted forks on my 650R. I have not had a frame problem with this bike and am not even worried about it. I have a bachelor's degree in Metallurgical Engineering and am finishing up a masters in the same program. You do not have to worry about using an aluminum skidplate!

For the record, I did break the frame on my 2000 650R. Honda warrantied the frame ($1200). It failed at the right footpeg mount (I broke it just as the update for the steel shim on the footpeg mount was coming out). I have also wadded up my fair share of oil pump covers (keep a spare in the trailer), subframes, wheels, rear hubs, radiators, linkage, and the like. But I'm not even remotely worried about the frame.

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  • Blade Man

Posted October 23, 2006 - 10:30 AM

#23

Cool. Lots of info.

Allthough I have heard nothing Bad about the stock skid plate. Where do I find it at a reasonable price?

  • eastreich

Posted October 23, 2006 - 10:51 AM

#24

Service Honda sells them for $32.27. I do not know what shipping would be, but according to Service, retail from your local Honda dealer should be $44.11. That is quite a bit cheaper than an aluminum plate either way.

Now if someone just made a carbon fiber skid plate (reinforced with cross weaved Kevlar, of course!). :mad:

  • jzboost

Posted February 14, 2009 - 01:30 AM

#25

For the record, I did break the frame on my 2000 650R. Honda warrantied the frame ($1200). It failed at the right footpeg mount (I broke it just as the update for the steel shim on the footpeg mount was coming out). I have also wadded up my fair share of oil pump covers (keep a spare in the trailer), subframes, wheels, rear hubs, radiators, linkage, and the like. But I'm not even remotely worried about the frame.


Just dug up this old thread and saw something about a steel shim update for the footpeg mount. I got a 2000 and wonder when it came out and if its something to worry about.





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