Wheelie......


44 replies to this topic
  • Brent McCabe

Posted November 20, 2006 - 04:55 AM

#41

Its important he learns how to compress the front forks and then roll on the throttle as the shocks rebound. Easiest way for me to get a wheelie going without being too hard on the trani like popping the clutch.

But . . the WR is not a wheelie machine. It definately can be done but there are a lot better bikes with lighter front ends . . .


I push down on the bars but the forks are so stiff they don't compress very much. How much should the forks compress? Thank you

  • drtbk4ever

Posted November 20, 2006 - 09:05 AM

#42

Brent,

The forks don't need to compress much, it is more of a way to add to your momentum. You move your body forward to compress the forks, then as your body returns to a neutral position (sometimes combined with a tug on the bars) you give it more throttle, and presto, up comes the front wheel. That is the easy part.

Keeping the wheel up without going over backwards is the hard part. You need to find the optimum balancing point, between going over backwards and where you don't need acceleration to keep the front end up.

I agree with a previous post about doing it on some soft ground with all your equipment on. Be prepared to damage the odd rear fender.

But to be completely truthful, I think that once you are able to get back on the bike, take a lot more time to learn to ride with both wheels on the ground. Take a course, or look around for some instructional videos. Being one with the bike on two wheels will make any of your wheelie/jumping attempts less likely to result in broken parts (bike and body).

By the way, how are you healing up?

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  • Brent McCabe

Posted November 20, 2006 - 01:20 PM

#43

Brent,

The forks don't need to compress much, it is more of a way to add to your momentum. You move your body forward to compress the forks, then as your body returns to a neutral position (sometimes combined with a tug on the bars) you give it more throttle, and presto, up comes the front wheel. That is the easy part.

Keeping the wheel up without going over backwards is the hard part. You need to find the optimum balancing point, between going over backwards and where you don't need acceleration to keep the front end up.

I agree with a previous post about doing it on some soft ground with all your equipment on. Be prepared to damage the odd rear fender.

But to be completely truthful, I think that once you are able to get back on the bike, take a lot more time to learn to ride with both wheels on the ground. Take a course, or look around for some instructional videos. Being one with the bike on two wheels will make any of your wheelie/jumping attempts less likely to result in broken parts (bike and body).

By the way, how are you healing up?


Quite well, thank you, but not healing fast enough! Have been off my bike for 6 weeks and have ant's in my pant's!

  • krazed0451

Posted November 21, 2006 - 04:32 AM

#44

Hi Guys,

I ride an XR400R and was just cruising through this forum for a peak... I noticed this thread and I'm always looking for a tip or two to improve my wheelie skills :-)

The :p WR450 has HEAPS of power compared to a (nearly) stock XR400... All I've done is pull out the baffling, open up the air intake and jet the carb. I currently ride my bike on the road everyday and love having something light and tall to "throw" between the traffic :-D

I've been wheelieing on the road for a bit now, I started out on a Suzuki GS500E, which believe me was NOT a fun start point... I had to rev and dump her in 2nd to get the nose up to the balance point then try to catch it so I didn't have any little embarrassing moments :eek: (I've been riding since I was 7 so I've had about 15 years now) :-P

Since I got hold of my XR (about a year ago) wheelieing has become one of the easiest and most pleasurable activities :-D I can pull it up in 1st/2nd/3rd and ride it up to 5th gear up to about (88mp/h)140kp/h if going for speed or level out at about (60mp/h)100kp/h and keep her there...

It took me about 3months of stuffing about to get the confidence up to sit on the balance point and I can now pull it up and sit on it in 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th..

The best piece of advice I can offer is: Set up your basics first (ie, learn to ride before you try to pull ballance point wheelies) When you are much more familiar with your bike and have a little experience behind you it should be very simple to pull the WR up on her tail and (eventually) learn to keep it there.

Starting off wheelieing, simply roll on some power in 2nd or 3rd and start the front coming up, you won't need to dump or "blip" the clutch at all... just start off with something small (maybe a foot off the ground) and keep at it as you build your confidence. Once you get the hang of it bring it up faster and higher and as it comes up further it'll become easier and more natural (If it feels like your gonna go all the way over, shut the throttle (unless you've really stuffed up this'll be heaps)). Watch HEAPS of stunt video's!

As it stands, I'm currently trying to improve on my current record of 3.2km on the rear (through some light curves)... Anyone else out there going for distance?

One more thing... :bonk: Police :crazy: (no matter what country you are in) DO NOT appreciate wheelies on the road...

If you're as silly as I am and get some road action, don't even think about it until you have been riding for more than 2 years on the road. The last thing a driver expects to see is a motorcycle coming down the road bashplate first and this usually results in some particularly interesting reactions. Even if you are in your lane, don't rely one them not to take you out :worthy: Oh, and find the quietest piece of road you can :cheers:

  • MountainMax

Posted November 21, 2006 - 02:31 PM

#45

Welcome to the Blue section (hehe) thanks for your input, and awesome 3.2km on your wheelies, do you have any wheely videos yourself? or anyone else that can elinghten us with some nice how it's done wheelies, especially on our WR's ?? I started out earlier this year doing wheelies and i was only getting the front up about a foot like you say, and kept practicing, now it feels like she's up hight and i can got through all the gears but im not at the balance point, I guess if i was i could keep her in any gear and keep wheeling right?? i can;'t do that yet, i find once she' sup so high in the air i can't touch the brake as my boots won't let my feet bend enough to reach it while my foot is on the footrest. will letting off the throttle be enough? it wans't on my old CR125 but the 4 strokes do have more compression braking though.......




 
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