1999 WR400F Suspension Settings


3 replies to this topic
  • redrocket190

Posted October 11, 2006 - 02:01 PM

#1

I am about to complete a 1999 WR400F and would like to know stock clicker settings for the fork and shock, and any baseline settings you might offer for a 185lb+gear rider, novice, riding GPs. Thanks in advance.

  • standup rider

Posted October 13, 2006 - 07:20 AM

#2

I have a 99WR400 and found that The standard setting was off for me. Try using panduit ties and install them around one of your front fork tubes and around your rear shock shaft. Then go out and ride under the conditions you like to ride in and see how much these panduit tie's slide down towards the bottom of the shock/forks compression stroke. If you are bottomed out, add compression, if you are not using the whole shock or forks travel then try setting it softer. This technique helped me alot in seeing what my suspension was doing. Once I got the compression set then I adjusted the rebound based on how much my front and back kicked up after hitting a bigger bump. There is of course a lot to all of this but hopefully this basic info helps you out.
Factory setting are - Fork rebound 9 clicks out, rear shock rebound 13 clicks out from being turned all the way in. Fork compression 7 clicks out, rear shock compression 10 clicks out. Maximum clicks out on all setting is 20 clicks out. Compression adjustments are at the bottom/ground end of your forks and the top side of your rear shock in case you were not clear on this. Fork rebound setting are on top and easy to see and adjust but the rear shock rebound is at the bottom of your shock and hard to see. Turning the clickers out or counter clockwise softens your compression so that you will bottom out easier and turning you rebound clickers out or counter clockwise will make your suspension kick back faster/harder.
Sorry if this is to basic for you but if it is not, then not being afraid to play with your suspension and make adjustments will help you tremendously in making your suspension work better for you. Make sure you get your rear suspension sag set properly first. Your rear shock is set up for a 160 lb. rider but you at 185 should be in the ball park. Your front fork springs should be a little hard for your weight but still close enough. Good luck.

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  • Chaindrive

Posted October 14, 2006 - 07:56 AM

#3

I have an Iowa-plated '99 WR400 that has been "YZ'd". I am the same weight as you (or was...) and went with a complete Race Tech setup some years ago(RT recommended springs and valving). I also used a newer YZ426 shock with both low and high speed adjustment.

My riding skills are intermediate at best. The first thing I noticed on my favorite track was how forgiving the suspension now is of my poor form and mistakes. Huge difference. What used to crash me, doesn't anymore. It immediately made me a faster, if not necessarily better, rider. The confidence factor really helps, too.

You are doing the right thing, getting your suspension dialed in, whether you use RT products or not. The '99 WR suspension is way too soft and mushy for a 185 pound guy and especially on any type of jumps or brake bumps, whoops, etc.

Good luck! You will know it was money well-spent! Go take a free look on the RT site at the recommended vs. stock spring rates for your size and skill level. It's a big difference! Try it using both a '99 YZ400 and a '99 WR400 as the bike in the equation. That will show you the difference between stock YZ and stock WR springs, too.

  • Jekel

Posted October 15, 2006 - 03:29 PM

#4

If you happen to have a shop revalve the suspension look into lowering the bike. I had mine dropped 1 1/2 inches and the difference is day and night. Bike fels much lighter with the lower center of gravity.




 
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