Per the manual!


5 replies to this topic
  • tnl

Posted October 08, 2006 - 12:50 PM

#1

I've read alot of threads regarding newer 450S and learned alot about my bike on this site. I have read many threads that discuss doing things like the manual says and vise versa like oil change procedures, and other routine maintenance procedures. It's obvious that personal opinions play a role in how people agree/disagree to the manual with the above procedures. My question: What are some of the top recommended (per the manual) maintenance procedures that some of you disagree with? Like doing a partial oil change rather than a complete oil change per the manual including removing all external oil lines or chain slack measurements, other fluid replacement intervals etc? I ask this because I am interested in learning more about my bike and want to hear what other people have to say that have more seat/wrench time than I do.

  • grayracer513

Posted October 08, 2006 - 07:02 PM

#2

A couple of things to keep in mind about manuals:

For one, because of safety and civil liability issues, the manuals have to cover every procedure by the most completely risk-free method possible. Parts are recommended for removal that are not really in the way, but it makes it less likely that someone will screw things up and blame Yamaha's instructions.

Another is that Japanese apparently translates to English with an unusual degree of difficulty, because even big companies with the funding to get it done right seem to do it rather poorly. This can lead to a lack of clarity about certain things.

Also, the reason a certain procedure is called for is not always, in fact hardly ever, explained. Like the draining of the feed line. This has little or nothing to do with draining the tiny amount of oil the line contains, as it would seem when you are instructed to drain the line, and everything to do with not damaging the line when disconnecting it from the frame fitting for the removal of the feed screen.

Other times, something will be carried over from one manual to another that gets missed by the Tech Editors, like the torque spec from for the front axle nut. The steel nuts on an '05 and earlier were to be tightened to 75 ft/lb. The '06 axle nut is aluminum. Don't expect it to take too many 75 pound tightenings without failing.

And, while the manufacturer should certainly be expected to know more about their product than anyone else, especially in the case of such a well engineered and outrageously durable piece of work as a YZF, still, users in the field often come up with ways to improve not only the product, but the service procedures as well.

Going by the manual is almost always the safest thing to do when there is any doubt. But here are a few points where I differ.

> Draining the oil lines is a waste of time, and an unnecessary and detrimental disturbance of the part involved, unless you are removing the frame screen. Inspecting the frame screen is only needed annually, or when there is some reason to suspect you'll find something (like major engine work, bike went under water, etc.)

> Using the bottom oil filter cover bolt to drain the filter well sends metal contaminated oil back into the crankcase and contaminates the threads in the process, thus causing wear and failure of the threads.

> 86 inch pounds on oiled threads is an uncomfortably high torque level for the cam caps, IMO. I use 75 in/lb on all my bikes and any that I build or adjust.

> The axle nut I mentioned earlier. I don't use a torque wrench on axle nuts, but I'd guess I tighten my '06 to a figure closer to 45-50 ft/lb.

> The radiators and carburetor do not have to come off to adjust or check the valve clearances, and most everyone knows it.

> You do not need to drain the oil to remove either the clutch or ignition covers if you run the engine first, and you can get it closed up in less than a couple of hours.

> refilling '04 and earlier forks, I fill to the top, work the outer tube, the pump the air out of the cartridge, instead of the other way 'round, because that way I don't end up dumping out any oil after I'm done.

  • jbrooks26

Posted October 08, 2006 - 08:09 PM

#3

> Using the bottom oil filter cover bolt to drain the filter well sends metal contaminated oil back into the crankcase and contaminates the threads in the process, thus causing wear and failure of the threads.


OK, how do you drain it? I have always drained the case and frame then removed the lower bolt. Never got much oil out of it though, usually runs down the side of the case when I remove the cover. Thanks Gray.

Josh

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  • grayracer513

Posted October 08, 2006 - 08:56 PM

#4

OK, how do you drain it?

Remove the lower bolt last, and just let it run out.

  • jbrooks26

Posted October 08, 2006 - 09:25 PM

#5

Remove the lower bolt last, and just let it run out.


Ok, makes sense now. I didn't see what you were talking about before. Thanks,

Josh

  • Crash 2006

Posted October 08, 2006 - 11:57 PM

#6

A couple of things to keep in mind about manuals:

For one, because of safety and civil liability issues, the manuals have to cover every procedure by the most completely risk-free method possible. Parts are recommended for removal that are not really in the way, but it makes it less likely that someone will screw things up and blame Yamaha's instructions.

Another is that Japanese apparently translates to English with an unusual degree of difficulty, because even big companies with the funding to get it done right seem to do it rather poorly. This can lead to a lack of clarity about certain things.

Also, the reason a certain procedure is called for is not always, in fact hardly ever, explained. Like the draining of the feed line. This has little or nothing to do with draining the tiny amount of oil the line contains, as it would seem when you are instructed to drain the line, and everything to do with not damaging the line when disconnecting it from the frame fitting fro the removal of the feed screen.

Other times, something will be carried over from one manual to another that gets missed by the Tech Editors, like the torque spec from for the front axle nut. The steel nuts on an '05 and earlier were to be tightened to 75 ft/lb. The '06 axle nut is aluminum. Don't expect it to take too many 75 pound tightenings without failing.

And, while the manufacturer should certainly be expected to know more about their product than anyone else, especially in the case of such a well engineered and outrageously durable piece of work as a YZF, still, users in the field often come up with ways to improve not only the product, but the service procedures as well.

Going by the manual is almost always the safest thing to do when there is any doubt. But here are a few points where I differ.

> Draining the oil lines is a waste of time, and an unnecessary and detrimental disturbance of the part involved, unless you are removing the frame screen. Inspecting the frame screen is only needed annually, or when there is some reason to suspect you'll find something (like major engine work, bike went under water, etc.)

> Using the bottom oil filter cover bolt to drain the filter well sends metal contaminated oil back into the crankcase and contaminates the threads in the process, thus causing wear and failure of the threads.

> 86 inch pounds on oiled threads is an uncomfortably high torque level for the cam caps, IMO. I use 75 in/lb on all my bikes and any that I build or adjust.

> The axle nut I mentioned earlier. I don't use a torque wrench on axle nuts, but I'd guess I tighten my '06 to a figure closer to 45-50 ft/lb.

> The radiators and carburetor do not have to come off to adjust or check the valve clearances, and most everyone knows it.

> You do not need to drain the oil to remove either the clutch or ignition covers if you run the engine first, and you can get it closed up in less than a couple of hours.

> refilling '04 and earlier forks, I fill to the top, work the outer tube, the pump the air out of the cartridge, instead of the other way 'round, because that way I don't end up dumping out any oil after I'm done.


Thanks for the clarifcation!





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