Suspension Help - Please!



9 replies to this topic
  • Tom14911

Posted December 09, 2001 - 12:10 PM

#1

2001 wr. I weigh about 205 - stock. I ride probably 80% trail, 20% track. Suspension is stock. Sag is 95, just re-checked. rear comp is 8 out. Rear rebound is 8 out.

Front springs are stock, comp is 12 out and rebound is 10 out.

Steering damper installed.

Here is my problem. On flat turns the front end wants to dive into the ground. I've tried alot of stuff but can't seem to correct it. Please any suggestions.

Thanks in advance;

Tom

  • Tom14911

Posted December 09, 2001 - 02:03 PM

#2

Additionally, I know I probably need different springs because of my size but I'm lloking maybe for a short term help until that time.

Thanks again Tom

  • Woodzi

Posted December 09, 2001 - 02:47 PM

#3

You can increase the pre-load on the front springs by making some spacers out of plastic pipe.

  • Capt_Hookleg

Posted December 09, 2001 - 04:00 PM

#4

You can use the thick wall pvc for a spacer, but make sure that you put a steel washer between the spring and the pvc, otherwise your fork oil will be contaminated with plastic.

  • gavin500

Posted December 09, 2001 - 04:46 PM

#5

I've got my front and rear set at 14 all over.
Huge improvement.
Then I've gone +/-1 or 2 over the course of the day.

There is a fine line between comfort and wash outs.

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  • MX_Tuner

Posted December 10, 2001 - 01:54 AM

#6

I think I'd try running a higher oil level before I tried more preload. If you do go with more preload, be SURE to put all preoald spacers and shims in underneath the spring.

  • The_Missile

Posted December 10, 2001 - 02:54 AM

#7

Why the heck isnt there a preload adjuster built into these little gems ? From mountain biking experience I had a fork that had compr/rebound/preload adjustment at the turn of a dial or three. Is it mostly redundant with motorbikes because of the already heavy weight, the huge travel and much higher speeds?.... what gives ? Do other brands have them ?

Also based on mountain bike experience I really wouldnt want to mess around with spacers & doodads inside of my expen$ive moto forks...if I screwed up using wrong material, wrong diameter, strength etc it would be $$$$$ down the tube (sorry for the pun). I already paid the price on my mountain bike forks long ago when I was young and stupid(er). I cant imagine what would happen if somethingn screwed up with the additional forces coming from moto.

I would recommend being patient and order the right springs.

  • Woodzi

Posted December 10, 2001 - 11:38 AM

#8

Even with the correct springs, the preload still needs to be set correctly. There are some bikes that come with adjustable preload, and I believe there are aftermarket products avaiable. You are correct that the heavier springs will probably be the best overall solution given Tom's weight.

I made spacers out of nylatron on a lathe for my YZ250. I had the bike for 10 years with no problems (with the forks or anything else -why did I buy that Husaberg???) I have also heard of using plastic pipe. Someone suggested a washer to make sure that the spring does not cause wear to the plastic, which sounds like very good advise.

  • John_Curea

Posted December 10, 2001 - 03:03 PM

#9

Tom
The stock fork springs (.46) are correct for your weight and riding conditions.

The Oil height only affects the last 2 to 3 inches of travel. And if we are that far into the travel during flat turns , we have problems elsewhere.

The 01 WR426 has a pretty soft 2 stage valve stack in the forks that lets the bike go through the stroke pretty easily.

I would add compression damping by going in with the compression adjuster 2 to 4 clicks. The fork diving is a low speed damping issue, and that is primarily what the clickers affect the most.

I would also recommend checking the preload, make sure you have 12 - 15mm. A four stroke requires more than a 2 stroke (which is usually run at 8-10mm) because of the heavier weight and the added compression braking effect of the engine. The extra preload helps the front end ride higher up in the stroke.

As Tuner mentioned, make sure any preload washers are placed on the bottom of the fork spring. I would stay away from PVC, I have seen the results of shattered PVC in a fork, a major mess.

Also, keeping it simple, I would take the forks apart just to make sure that one of the fork springs arent broken.

Take Care, John

[ December 10, 2001: Message edited by: John Curea ]

  • Tom14911

Posted December 10, 2001 - 05:22 PM

#10

Thanks for all the info guys I really appreciate it. Today I got my new DR in the mail and it actually has a set-up for a guy thats 6' 190#

It's for the YZ426 but I'm thinkin' the suspension is the same.....is that correct?

Anyway I think that set-up is a great starting point (and all the springs are stock)

Tom




 
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