Cleaning the Bike


18 replies to this topic
  • johnnyjeep

Posted August 21, 2006 - 12:31 PM

#1

OK, all of your bikes look showroom perfect! That said, How do you guys do it? Oil the chain and if the wind blows, the lower rear is covered with dirt. Change the oil and check for pressure, oil is leaking (i know just a little). It almost seems that if I look at my bike, it needs a cleaning.
I dont like cleaning the bike. I like the way it looks when its clean, but where do you draw the line? I ride my bike a lot, even if I only have a 1/2 hr, but the hrs to clean it are rediculous.
Also, are you guys just cleaning what can be seen, or are you tearing the bike down every time you ride?

John in Vegas

  • CRFThumper

Posted August 21, 2006 - 12:38 PM

#2

S-100,pro clean,honda brite it's all the same stuff and works great! Spray it on rinse it off and you are ready to go again! :thumbsup:

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted August 21, 2006 - 01:03 PM

#3

Rinse the bike then spray Simple Green diluted to about 20% all over. Let it sit for a few minutes then rinse well. The bike will be 95% clean at that point. Do another coat of Simple Green solution, then use a bucket of car wash soap and a sponge to get the tough stuff. Rinse. After it's dry, spray everything (metal and plastics- don't forget under the fenders) with WD-40 to make the next cleanup easier.

  • Bullwinkle

Posted August 21, 2006 - 01:16 PM

#4

It's a dirt bike, why does it need to be clean? (I don't like cleaning the bike either. [Or much of anything else for that matter.]) I just do what's needed functionally like keeping the chain and sprockets clean and lubed, wipe down the fork tubes, etc.. Other than that she'll just have to forgive me!
:thumbsup:

  • kskyles

Posted August 21, 2006 - 02:41 PM

#5

i don't spend a lot of time cleaning the bike either. after every ride i spray it off, spray it with simple green, rinse. i brush off anything that sticks, let it dry, lube the chain and put it in the garage.

i spend most time making sure the engine and carb are clean, so that i can work on it without worrying about dirt.

i ride with the philosophy that it doesn't need to look good - it just needs to run well....i even peel off all the graphics. it's an ugly beast.

  • ETP

Posted August 21, 2006 - 02:54 PM

#6

It's a dirt bike, why does it need to be clean? (I don't like cleaning the bike either. [Or much of anything else for that matter.]) I just do what's needed functionally like keeping the chain and sprockets clean and lubed, wipe down the fork tubes, etc.. Other than that she'll just have to forgive me!
:thumbsup:


He's right. Its a dirt bike. By the time I drive into the riding areas to unload my bike from the truck, or the back of my RV, its dirty. The only reason to clean it is so you won't get dirt inside of sub-assemblies while doing maintenance, and if you're buddies come over to the house and you are showing off your latest mods. (from TT, of course.) :ride:
I use just car soap and water. It does just fine, but we don't get much caked on mud out here in Southern California.

  • SID013

Posted August 21, 2006 - 03:15 PM

#7

Here in OZ we have a home made product called MX-60 & its fantastic. Make up a solution 10-1 spray it on, wait 15 minutes & hose off. Brings up the bike like new. No scrubbing, no sponges just spray on hose off. Couldn't be easier. I have a simple philosophy, look after it & it'll look after you. :thumbsup:

  • texas_hippie

Posted August 21, 2006 - 03:53 PM

#8

Mine gets a thorough cleaning after every ride, and a panel off cleaning every month or so. I bought a long bristled, soft car brush from Wally Mart, and use ordinary dish detergent in a bucket. Simple green is corrossive to all your aluminum parts guys! Just threw that in, incase you weren't aware. Dewatering the bike after a good wash is the most important part. I have a weed eater brand leaf blower that I use to dry the bike. It forces the water out of all the little places it collects, (like in the radiator fins) and does away with all the water spots too. It's just easier to work on a clean bike, and I can see all the places that need my attention maintenance wise, like leaks, loose parts, ect. Have you ever seen a dirty factory works bike at a race? If you aspire to ride like a pro, look like one! And by the way, if you're using simple green, or similar cleaners, take a good look at your radiator fins down at the bottom where wash water collects. Bet your gonna eventually find some grey/whitish powder growing down there. Damn...I sound like a preacher now, huh? :thumbsup:

  • tarry

Posted August 22, 2006 - 07:49 AM

#9

Dewatering the bike after a good wash is the most important part. I have a weed eater brand leaf blower that I use to dry the bike. It forces the water out of all the little places it collects, (like in the radiator fins) and does away with all the water spots too. It's just easier to work on a clean bike, and I can see all the places that need my attention maintenance wise, like leaks, loose parts, ect. Have you ever seen a dirty factory works bike at a race? If you aspire to ride like a pro, look like one! And by the way, if you're using simple green, or similar cleaners, take a good look at your radiator fins down at the bottom where wash water collects. Bet your gonna eventually find some grey/whitish powder growing down there. Damn...I sound like a preacher now, huh? :thumbsup:[/QUOTE]
I agree 100%, and I love the leaf blower idea! Might have to buy one instead of using the air compressor!

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  • 2tall2tall

Posted August 22, 2006 - 10:10 AM

#10

I've been using S-100 for several years with great results. I highly recommend it.

  • Punisher660

Posted August 22, 2006 - 10:45 AM

#11

I agree 100%, and I love the leaf blower idea! Might have to buy one instead of using the air compressor!



Stick to the air comopressor - better preassure and gets the water out of tight places better.


As for cleaning the bike - I use a 2300 psi power washer :thumbsup:
I spray it down after every ride (I hate getting on a filthy bike). I do have some areas that don't get near as much attention like under the seat on my WR, but it usually isn't too bad. After Washing and drying with rags and the air compressor, I lube the chain, cables, levers, etc. and WD-40 the electrical. My bike runs like a champ and even after 1500 miles still looks fantastic :ride:

If you don't have a preassure washer, I suggest using a garden hose with a preassure nozel and spending $5 at the car wash every few rides. Its easier to see problem areas developing, makes mechanical chores easier, and keeps it looking good. Remember - a clean bike is usually a good running bike.

  • texas_hippie

Posted August 25, 2006 - 04:53 PM

#12

Stick to the air comopressor - better preassure and gets the water out of tight places better.


As for cleaning the bike - I use a 2300 psi power washer :thumbsup:
I spray it down after every ride (I hate getting on a filthy bike). I do have some areas that don't get near as much attention like under the seat on my WR, but it usually isn't too bad. After Washing and drying with rags and the air compressor, I lube the chain, cables, levers, etc. and WD-40 the electrical. My bike runs like a champ and even after 1500 miles still looks fantastic :ride:

If you don't have a preassure washer, I suggest using a garden hose with a preassure nozel and spending $5 at the car wash every few rides. Its easier to see problem areas developing, makes mechanical chores easier, and keeps it looking good. Remember - a clean bike is usually a good running bike.

Be careful where you aim that pressure washer. You stand a good chance of blasting water, detergent, and of course the grit you're trying to get rid of deep into bearings, seals, and ect. because of the extreme pressures it puts out. As for the compressor, same thing. The leaf blower doesn't generate a butt load of pressure, but it does put out a hell of alot of flow, and that rapidly evaporates the water, vice just blowing it deeper into crevices and such. I've seen a comercially made bike dryer on the market lately, that even warms the air first to aid in evaporation, but I'll be damn if I'm gonna spend over 150 bucks for it. Besides, it don't do shit for my leaf problems in the fall! LOL :applause:
Hippie>>>>sends

  • WildRide

Posted August 25, 2006 - 08:21 PM

#13

Get wet, simple green, fast once-over with soapy sponge, rinse and ride up and down the street 4 or 5 times to blow dry. I have learned to NEVER put a bike away wet, just getting some heat into the engine and exhaust as well as flinging out the water from the wheels/hubs/chain will dry up the important stuff reducing any chance of water related troubles in the future.

  • JSanfilippo

Posted August 26, 2006 - 12:47 AM

#14

Simple green, car wash soap and sponge, and then armor all.

  • Sec1

Posted September 24, 2006 - 10:09 AM

#15

Here in OZ we have a home made product called MX-60 & its fantastic. Make up a solution 10-1 spray it on, wait 15 minutes & hose off. Brings up the bike like new. No scrubbing, no sponges just spray on hose off. Couldn't be easier. I have a simple philosophy, look after it & it'll look after you. :thumbsup:



Good call bro!!!!

Ct18 Truck wash is good too..... Same thing Spray On .. Have a Jar and Rinse..

:lame:

  • Alley Cat

Posted September 24, 2006 - 10:24 AM

#16

I found I used the whole 1 litre bottle of MX-60 up in 2 washes. It did work good and left the bike shiny, but won't be using it again.

I prefer the faithful CT18 and pressure washer.

  • MountainMax

Posted September 24, 2006 - 11:34 AM

#17

I spray mine down with spray9 and then hose it off with a pressure washer, works great. Hardly any scrubbing, except maybe near the chain.

  • SID013

Posted September 24, 2006 - 04:41 PM

#18

I like the fact the MX-60 has a corrosion inhibitor in it which has to be good for your bike. I ride quite a bit near & on the beaches here so gotta look out for that. Don't know what CT-18 has but I agree its good to :thumbsup:

  • Alley Cat

Posted September 24, 2006 - 08:57 PM

#19

I like the fact the MX-60 has a corrosion inhibitor in it which has to be good for your bike. I ride quite a bit near & on the beaches here so gotta look out for that. Don't know what CT-18 has but I agree its good to :thumbsup:

CT18 is actually full of caustic and is quite harsh on your bike and plastics if left on too long.
That doesn't worry me, it just works soooo good on mud and crap!




 
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