Quick Carb Questions


25 replies to this topic
  • drtbk4ever

Posted August 20, 2006 - 11:45 AM

#1

Hey Guys,

I need some input on a couple things:


I can't get out the screws that hold the float bowl. They are stuck tight and I have already stripped one of them.
Any tips on how to get the :thumbsup: things out?

I have read that once you get them out you can replace them with screws/bolts with Allen head on em.
TRUE or FALSE?

Thanks guys.

  • spritefiend

Posted August 20, 2006 - 01:31 PM

#2

i stripped one of mine out just the other day getting them off :| what ended up working for me was heating the head of the bolt a little and having the correct sized screw driver.

as far as replacing with an allen head bolt, that sure as hell is what im going to do...

John.

  • xr_man

Posted August 20, 2006 - 01:49 PM

#3

thought the FCR had allen screws already ??

  • drtbk4ever

Posted August 20, 2006 - 02:33 PM

#4

thought the FCR had allen screws already ??


There are some allen screws on the top of the carb, but not holding the float bowl on. Perhaps the newer models have Allens all the way around, but my 2004 does not.

John, Thanks for the suggestion.

Any others?

  • texas_hippie

Posted August 20, 2006 - 05:49 PM

#5

I work on aircraft for a living, and this is a common problem. In fact, I ran into the same thing with my brand new 06 while doing the free mods. There are several tricks..
1. Moisten the head of your srew driver, then dip it in comet, or talcum powder. This sometimes helps if you haven't totally boogered up the head.
2. Sears/Craftsman makes an impact style screw remover...this only works if you have a good solid clamp on the part you're pulling the screw from...for instance, you're going to have to pull the carb from the bike, and put it in a vise (don't crush the carb with the vice, of course!)
3. Needle nose vice grips (last resort, and ultimately what I had to use on my carb) get a good grip on the screws head, and turn gently,(you don't want to twist the head off). Of course, you're going to have to replace that screw!
There are many places on this bike where the screw, and what they're screwed into are disimilar metals, and hence you have what is termed as galvanic corrosion. Whenever you remove a problem screw, or install a new replacement, use a little dab of antiseize compound on it before you re-install that sucker. It'll save you hours of agravation later on, and possibly keep the skin on your knuckles intact too! :thumbsup:
The Hippie>>>>sends

  • texas_hippie

Posted August 20, 2006 - 05:56 PM

#6

There are some allen screws on the top of the carb, but not holding the float bowl on. Perhaps the newer models have Allens all the way around, but my 2004 does not.

John, Thanks for the suggestion.

Any others?

My 06 has #2 phillips head screws on the bottom. The Allen head idea seems to be the "hot set-up"..damn good idea! Don't forget the antisieze compound, and if you don't have any on hand, vaseline works too! Just coat the threads a little bit, don't pack it in the hole.

  • MountainMax

Posted August 20, 2006 - 06:42 PM

#7

The one pet peeve i have for yamaha's the dam screws, especially the philip head's are soft and strip easy, I replaced all i could with allen head screws or bolts whenever I can.

  • WR_Dave

Posted August 21, 2006 - 04:04 AM

#8

Yamaha doesn't build the carbs so the screws are Keihins problem, as for getting a stripped screw out, remove the carb and carefully (without getting anything into the carb) use a hacksaw blade to cut a straight blade slot in the screw head. Then replace with allen head screws. My .02 --- WR Dave.

  • ncmountainman

Posted August 21, 2006 - 06:29 AM

#9

i have a small pair of wire cutters that are pretty sharp and pointy,i clamped down on the sides of the screw head with the cutters straight in line with the screw...made sure that the cutters actually scored into the screw head (quite easy they are like butter) and twisted the screw out. worked great,then i replaced with 06 yz allen heads :thumbsup:

  • drtbk4ever

Posted August 21, 2006 - 07:08 AM

#10

Wow, great info guys.

The carb is already out of the bike so half the work is done. I am hoping to get into the float bowl to change the leak jet, and soon too. Cause the longer it's off the bike the greater the chance I'll forget how to put it back on.

So when you guys refer to "Antiseize" compound, you are not talking about Locktite?

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  • Cairn

Posted August 21, 2006 - 09:58 AM

#11

DBFE:

I believe that the screws used to hold the float bowl on are "cross point" or JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) and not phillips head. They look similar, but the JIS has a longer, sharper point. I did not have trouble removing the screws with a JIS screwdriver. For more information, or to order a JIS screwdriver, "google" on "JIS screwdriver."

For the burred screw, I've used a long nose vice grip, as mentioned, successfully. If you cut the screw off, you can also use the vice grips to grab the screw shaft and remove the screw.

Good luck. :thumbsup:

Cairn

  • kskyles

Posted August 21, 2006 - 10:53 AM

#12

i've used bolt/screw extractors with out any issues. i've also used the vice grip method. they both worked well.

  • texas_hippie

Posted August 21, 2006 - 04:15 PM

#13

Good point! I'd never heard of the JIS...gonna get me some! Just goes to show...you're never too old to learn something new, you just gotta be receptive! Thanks :thumbsup:

  • drtbk4ever

Posted August 21, 2006 - 05:15 PM

#14

DBFE:

I believe that the screws used to hold the float bowl on are "cross point" or JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) and not phillips head. They look similar, but the JIS has a longer, sharper point. I did not have trouble removing the screws with a JIS screwdriver. For more information, or to order a JIS screwdriver, "google" on "JIS screwdriver."

For the burred screw, I've used a long nose vice grip, as mentioned, successfully. If you cut the screw off, you can also use the vice grips to grab the screw shaft and remove the screw.

Good luck. :thumbsup:

Cairn


Great info Cairn,

I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks. I used the hacksaw method to cut a slot in the screw head on the worst of the screws. Worked just fine.
However, I will see if I can find one of those Japanese Crosspoint screwdrivers to use on the remaining screws.

Now I gotta find allen bolts to replace them.

  • spritefiend

Posted August 21, 2006 - 05:40 PM

#15

^^^ i guess i shoulda mentioned that earlier lol..

i fly RC Helicopters, all Japanese made so i had a set of JIS that i figured would work on a Japanese bike :thumbsup:

John.

  • Beejay

Posted August 21, 2006 - 06:31 PM

#16

All these years I've been wondering why some phillips screw drivers are pointier/sharper than others ........now I know JIS.
So screw drivers made in Japan should be JIS, right?

  • Cairn

Posted August 22, 2006 - 07:45 AM

#17

Beejay,

I don't know if Japanese tool manufacturers only make cross point or JIS screwdrivers, but that may be the case. Hozan is a popular manufacturer. The screwdrivers come in various sizes. The #1 size works on the carburetor screws.

Cairn

  • nscmj3

Posted August 22, 2006 - 08:10 AM

#18

Use a dremel tool to cut a straight notch across the top of the screwhead. Then use a straight screwdriver to back it out. Should work no problem.

  • dbailey223

Posted August 22, 2006 - 01:44 PM

#19

I did the dremel tool thang the first time I tried to take those screws out back in 2004. Worked great. I've been too lazy to replace some of the screws that I dremeled, and just use a flat head screw driver ever since.

  • GCannon

Posted August 22, 2006 - 02:04 PM

#20

Another trick to add to dremel cut in the screw head method. Find a good fitting screwdriver and tap the screwdriver with a hammer to firmly seat the screwdriver blade into the screw slot. Do everything you can think of for a successful extraction the first time. As you know every unsuccessful attempt at extraction make the next attempt more difficult. :thumbsup:




 
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