Poor man's super moto


5 replies to this topic
  • red7

Posted July 18, 2006 - 09:55 PM

#1

An idea popped in my head today and I'm just curious how realistic it is. As I've posted in other threads I'm moving to Mazatlan Mexico later this year to enjoy life on the beach. I got a 2004 WR450 for cruising around the beaches as well as buzzing around the streets. I just got some Dunlop 952s tires as a good all around tire.

Today I started wondering how fun it would be to cruise around the city streets down there with street tires on it. I'm wondering what all it would take to set up another set of rims with street tires on it and also how long it would take to swap out my rims with dirt tires for street? If it's unrealistic to swap quickly then I should kill this idea but if it's fairly quick and easy then what all would I need to do get myself set up? I'm not thinking of making this a competitive super moto bike, just something fun for cruising around streets on. I'd still use the bike mostly for trail/mx riding.

Could I just find a used pair of Yamaha rims, brake discs and sprocket and put some street tires on them? Once I got used to it how quickly could I swap them out?

Thanks!

  • djv5

Posted July 19, 2006 - 04:05 AM

#2

I did the same thing on my 2003 WR450. I have Super Moto 17" Excel Wheels that I would put on for riding the street, and then switch back to the dirt wheels for the weekend trail rides. If you get an extra rear sprocket ($40), rear brake rotor ($20), and oversize front rotor ($80), then it should only take you less than 15 minutes to make the switch.

For street riding, you may want to go down a couple of teeth on the rear sprocket, this will give you a lower cruising rpm for running 60mph. But don't go too small on the rear sprocket, or else you will run out of adjustment to run the chain. I think I have a 45 tooth rear sprocket mounted to my super moto Excel wheel. I can power wheelie in 4th gear. 5th gear will give me about 105mph top speed. The oversize front rotor is a noticeable improvement in feel, but I need to change out my worn stock front brake pads.

Another thing to consider, is the extra wear & tear/strain on your transmission. We do not have a cushdrive on our rear wheels = not good for engine braking with the transmission.

PM me your email, and I can send you pics

  • red7

Posted July 19, 2006 - 07:28 PM

#3

Thanks for the reply. WHy the larger brake rotor in the front? Does it still line up fine with the caliper or how does that work? Why the smaller rims? Can I use any size rims?

Also, what's a cush drive? I'm wanting to keep this as simple as possible and I won't be racing around the streets...just riding normal. There's tons of traffic in Mazatlan especially during peak season so you can't really get to crazy on the streets. I'll have way more fun riding the beaches so this super moto thing is just an idea.

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  • mikedabike

Posted July 19, 2006 - 07:48 PM

#4

Thanks for the reply. WHy the larger brake rotor in the front? Does it still line up fine with the caliper or how does that work? Why the smaller rims? Can I use any size rims?

Also, what's a cush drive? I'm wanting to keep this as simple as possible and I won't be racing around the streets...just riding normal. There's tons of traffic in Mazatlan especially during peak season so you can't really get to crazy on the streets. I'll have way more fun riding the beaches so this super moto thing is just an idea.


The larger rotor because your stock one will overheat in short time on the street where 90% of your braking is done with the front. You can run the stock caliper with an adapter.
You use 17" rims because that is the size most street bikes use and thus the best tire availability.

  • Bamster

Posted July 20, 2006 - 05:16 AM

#5

what's a cush drive?



Rubber mounted rear sprocket.

  • JJHayesIII

Posted July 20, 2006 - 11:00 AM

#6

fwiw, I have Avon Gripsters on my plated wr400, and they're great for street riding, and perform reasonably well on the dirt too (for a shitty rider like myself)

but if you're planning on doing serious riding on and off road, I would go with the above suggestions...as for wheels, it's sometimes a lot cheaper to find stock wheels, and use those hubs laced to aftermarket 17" rims...

cool on moving to mexico, sounds like good times!




 
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