Zerks- how much grease ?


6 replies to this topic
  • Slim Shadetree

Posted July 18, 2006 - 12:56 PM

#1

how much grease should i pump into the zerks on my 600 ? i have a handheld mini grease gun and don't want to over fill.

also what do the 5 zerks service ? the rear wheel, the three on the rear susp, and the front wheel .

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  • cleonard

Posted July 18, 2006 - 01:13 PM

#2

You can't overfill. Just pump it in until some comes out the seals. I usually do a few pumps after it first starts coming out. The idea is to fill it so water can't get in, and to get new fresh grease in there. I don't know about the ones on the wheels. There isn't really a way for the grease to get out from the center other than through the bearing. Kind of hard if the wheel bearings are sealed.

The ones on the linkage are stock. I think that the ones on your wheels have been added. If someone put it on the wheels, take a look around the steering stem. There might be one there too.

While it's good to put grease in there, it's not a complete replacement for taking the bearings apart and really cleaning them. I take my swingarm off and clean everything every two years or so.

  • Slim Shadetree

Posted July 18, 2006 - 06:36 PM

#3

ok i pumped grease into the 3 body zerks till they oozed out some black grease and a few pumps into the wheel zerks. this winter when my manual is hopefully here by ( i ordered it 8 days ago from the stealership ) i will tear the back end apart for a clean. too much riding to do right now for that !!

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  • pburke

Posted July 18, 2006 - 07:47 PM

#4

ok i pumped grease into the 3 body zerks till they oozed out some black grease


you want to pump until the new clean grease comes out - that's when you got all the old crud out of there

Peter

  • snaggleXR650

Posted July 19, 2006 - 04:05 AM

#5

Actually, the new grease is taking the path of least resistance. It can and will bypass all the old dirty junk and squirt out the seals. This will make you think everything is filled with new fresh grease, but be aware. A yearly or bi-yearly tear down and cleaning/lubing is the by far the BEST way. Maybe more often if your bike goes swimming often.

  • Muddin

Posted July 19, 2006 - 08:55 AM

#6

:thumbsup: Are you guys using synthetic grease, cause its best for water resistance. :ride:

  • Phuzzy McPhuzzface

Posted July 19, 2006 - 09:11 AM

#7

Actually, the new grease is taking the path of least resistance. It can and will bypass all the old dirty junk and squirt out the seals. This will make you think everything is filled with new fresh grease, but be aware. A yearly or bi-yearly tear down and cleaning/lubing is the by far the BEST way. Maybe more often if your bike goes swimming often.


Yup. Snaggle speaks Gospel. :thumbsup:

Also, the new grease is more fluid than the old dryed up and gritty grease, so it wil flow around the old crud, and as stated, follow the path of least resistance. Even if there is no grit in the old grease, sometimes just the carrier is left (waxy/stiff thickener) after the actual lubricant has dissipated. I've had Mobil1 Syth Grease do this on my garage shelf. The actual Base Oil separates, and looks like some kind of cherry sno-cone juice. The waxy part stays in the grease gun. Oh joy...

What Is Grease?
According to the Practical Handbook of Lubrication, grease is a lubricant composed of a fluid lubricant thickened with a material that contributes a degree of plasticity.
Greases are typically used in areas where a continuous supply of oil cannot be retained, such as open bearings or chassis components.

Grease Components
Greases are comprised of two basic structural components: a base fluid and a thickening agent. Different types and combinations of thickeners and base fluids, along with supplemental structure modifiers and performance additives, combine to give the final product its special lubricating properties.

Base Oil - Many different types of base oil may be used in the manufacture of a grease, including petroleum (napthenic, parafinic) and synthetic (PAO's, esters, silicones, glycols). Just as with motor oils and transmission fluids, the viscosity of the base oil is the most significant property. A lighter, lower viscosity base oil is used to formulate low temperature greases, while heavier, higher viscosity base oil is used to formulate high temperature greases.
With outstanding lubricating abilities in temperature extremes, AMSOIL greases offer a wider range of application than conventional greases.

Thickener- Thickener is the term describing the ingredients added to a base oil in order to thicken it to a grease structure. The two basic types of thickeners are organic thickeners and inorganic thickeners. Organic thickeners can be either soap-based or non-soap based, while inorganic thickeners are non-soap based.
Simple soaps are formed with the combination of a fatty acid or ester (of either animal or vegetable origin) with an alkali earth metal, reacted with the application of heat, pressure or agitation through a process known as saponification. The fiber structure provided by the metal soap determines the mechanical stability and physical properties of the finished grease.
In order to take on enhanced performance characteristics, including higher dropping points, a complex agent is added to the soap thickener to convert it to a soap salt complex thickener. The greases are then referred to as "complexes" and include lithium complex greases like those provided by AMSOIL.

Additives- Chemical additives are added to grease in order to enhance their performance, much like the additives added to lubricating oils. Performance requirements, compatibility, environmental considerations, color and cost all factor into additive selection.





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