Chain Slap


32 replies to this topic
  • Express

Posted July 14, 2006 - 11:40 AM

#1

Do you 450 owners get ALOT of chain slap? My chain is adjusted properly and it seems I get more slap than I ever have on another bike.

Any remedies?

  • WGP

Posted July 14, 2006 - 12:08 PM

#2

Tighten it.......Seriously, it only takes an extra 1/4 turn to get rid of the slap....

  • SJMC_DON

Posted July 14, 2006 - 12:43 PM

#3

Tighten it.......Seriously, it only takes an extra 1/4 turn to get rid of the slap....



Disagree..........let it slap. 7 years, 3 WR's, always slap and no issues with chains or swingarms. I actually like the sound :ride:

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted July 14, 2006 - 01:15 PM

#4

Use Goop adhesive to glue the swingarm protector to the swingarm and your chain slap will go away.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 14, 2006 - 02:12 PM

#5

Chain slap is pretty much only present when you're lugging the engine, right? Just bring the revs up a bit and most of it will vanish.

Be sure of two things: have at least the minimum specified slack in the chain (never run it tighter), and be sure the rear wheel is aligned (the blocks aren't always marked accurately)

  • Bamster

Posted July 14, 2006 - 02:37 PM

#6

Tighten it.......Seriously, it only takes an extra 1/4 turn to get rid of the slap....



As your suspension goes through it's full stroke the chain will tighten when the swing arm is straight across form the front sprocket (if you put a point at the swing arm pivot, the middle of the front sprocket, the rear axle and connect the dots to make a straight line) If the chain is too tight you will put unwanted stress on the counter shaft. Never over tighten your chain.

A good bead of silicone under the slider will reduce the noisy chain slap.

  • farkawi

Posted July 14, 2006 - 07:39 PM

#7

There will always be a bit of chain slap on a long travel bike. Mine is most noticeable when I'm in decel mode and lugging a bit as Don sez. I prefer to run my chain toward the loose side of adjustment because chain and sprocket life are important to me. A chain that is too tight at the "perfect" spot (when the rear axle is in alignment w/ the countershaft sprocket) will cause undue chain wear or in the worst case scenario; transmission failure.

  • LimyWPom

Posted July 14, 2006 - 09:23 PM

#8

I have owned my 05 from new and made the mistake of assuming that the dealer would have set the chain tension correctly, after quite a few rides I checked it to find it was way too tight, as luck would have it with no ill affect.

  • JimdogWR450

Posted July 14, 2006 - 10:02 PM

#9

I had the same issue but my chain was also scraping the sub frame, so I did a search and found it's common on these bikes. I took the advice Bamster gave with the silicone bead under the chain guide and proper chain tension... problem solved...

  • MountainMax

Posted July 16, 2006 - 06:54 AM

#10

I too had this, a bit of silicone under the chain guide and it hasn't come back since, 1500km ago..... if you tighten your chain too much you could stretch it prematurely or worse yet, break your transmission case as the sprocket wants to pull towards the rear wheel under partial suspension travel.

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  • Indy_WR450

Posted July 16, 2006 - 11:37 AM

#11

Chain slap is perfectly normal for our bikes. Just make sure you put a 1/4" thick layer of Silcone under the chain slider to prevent swing arm wear. Do not overtighten the chain. Yamaha likes 3 fingers between the chain and slider. :ride:

  • Premo

Posted July 17, 2006 - 12:06 AM

#12

Either Adjust as per manual or take shock off and measure through arc.
Chain should be tight when the distance between sprockets is longest. This is when the swing arm is horizontal. This is the only way to perfectly adjust your chain.

It is not hard to do either, just take one bolt out of the linkage.
You only need to do it once in a while as o-ring and x-ring chains don't really streatch too much at all.

  • WGP

Posted July 17, 2006 - 07:01 AM

#13

Chain Slap is Unacceptable to me and I have found on the 05WR:

The noise is coming from hitting the subframe, which will ruin your subframe and your chain.

Like I said...As little as a 1/4 turn on your adjuster nut will make it dissappear AND will not be overtightened.

The swingarm problem is from dirt getting under the chain guide and rubbing away....which YES can be fixed with silicon, but nothing to do with chain slap or chain tension. (Could be if your way to loose)

Hope this helps....

  • k69mj

Posted July 17, 2006 - 09:14 AM

#14

Chain slap is not normal, at least not to me. It is not nice to listen to that sound, sometimes it can be louder than the exhaust. It can be partially solved, if you put a peace of foam under the chain slider. I know that the WR and the CRF have this problem, don't know about other bikes. My old DR350 didn't have this problem.

  • Premo

Posted July 17, 2006 - 04:32 PM

#15

I thought they already come with foam under the slider?

  • Express

Posted July 17, 2006 - 06:11 PM

#16

Ill try the silicone idea. My chain tension seems to be spot on.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 17, 2006 - 07:45 PM

#17

Chain Slap is Unacceptable to me and I have found on the 05WR:

The noise is coming from hitting the subframe, which will ruin your subframe and your chain.

Like I said...As little as a 1/4 turn on your adjuster nut will make it dissappear AND will not be overtightened.

The swingarm problem is from dirt getting under the chain guide and rubbing away....which YES can be fixed with silicon, but nothing to do with chain slap or chain tension. (Could be if your way to loose)

Hope this helps....


Chain slap is not normal, at least not to me. It is not nice to listen to that sound, sometimes it can be louder than the exhaust. It can be partially solved, if you put a peace of foam under the chain slider. I know that the WR and the CRF have this problem, don't know about other bikes. My old DR350 didn't have this problem.

Chain slap is normal on the big WRF/YZF models. The degree to which it does so may not be, and having it hit the sub frame or mud flap is not normal, and not caused by what causes chain slap.

If your chain is hitting the sub frame, your rear wheel is out of line. The marks on the axle blocks can't be depended on until you've verified their accuracy. Measuring back from the swing arm bolt, or running a straight edge forward from the rear sprocket are far more accurate methods.

Chain slap is produced by having a big bore 4-stroke single pulling a load at low engine speeds with low clearance between the swing arm and the top run of chain. Siliconing down the slider can reduce its life by not allowing it to shuffle around on its pegs to absorb the impact of the chain, but how much depends on how much lugging you do. Dropping the rear sag by as little as 10-15mm can make quite a difference, and if you do a lot of low speed pulling, you should run the chain as tight as possible. Just be certain not go too tight. You can check what that limit might be by a variety of means, all of which involve putting the suspension into the straight line position (axle, swing arm pivot, and counter shaft aligned), either by tying it down, pulling the shock loose, or just having a couple of friends sit on it, and checking the clearance. If you have 10-15mm of free slack at that point (free slack, not forcing the chain to move that distance), you'll be OK. Then set it back on the stand and record the measurement you get so it's more easily repeated later.

The wear under the slider does in fact occur due to grit getting under the slider. This is My Approach to the problem. It leaves the slider completely unmodified, totally stops the wear of the swing arm, and does so without pushing the slider any significant distance closer to the chain. Since it puts a layer of RTV on the swing arm, it also helps reduce the slap noise.

The DR350 likely didn't do this at least pertly because it was a smaller engine with much more flywheel weight for its displacement.

  • k69mj

Posted July 17, 2006 - 09:42 PM

#18

Well I think that Yamaha should have done a better job. The problem exists, many are complaining about it (for a long time). If they used a bigger front sprocket (16t, 17t) and an appropriate primary reduction ratio, that would probably solve the problem. The chain slider is also to thin (a thicker would probably help also).

What about the KTM LC4 & SXC, they are big bore thumpers but I never heard any slapping when I took one for a ride.

  • Premo

Posted July 17, 2006 - 09:53 PM

#19

Well I think that Yamaha should have done a better job. The problem exists, many are complaining about it (for a long time). If they used a bigger front sprocket (16t, 17t) and an appropriate primary reduction ratio, that would probably solve the problem. The chain slider is also to thin (a thicker would probably help also).

What about the KTM LC4 & SXC, they are big bore thumpers but I never heard any slapping when I took one for a ride.

Chain slider too thin? They last longer than aftermarket.

And if you want to go to 16/57 (same as 14/50), go ahead. You better buy two chains and join them together. :thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted July 17, 2006 - 10:26 PM

#20

Well I think that Yamaha should have done a better job. The problem exists, many are complaining about it (for a long time). If they used a bigger front sprocket (16t, 17t) and an appropriate primary reduction ratio, that would probably solve the problem. The chain slider is also to thin (a thicker would probably help also).

What about the KTM LC4 & SXC, they are big bore thumpers but I never heard any slapping when I took one for a ride.

A lower primary ratio puts more load on the clutch and the transmission, which is why Yamaha raised the ratio in the '05 model year. It also makes smooth clutch operation more difficult to achieve. Using a larger front sprocket would require a larger rear to match, with a corresponding increase in unsprung weight.

The simplest solution to the problem is just not to lug the engine so much. It isn't good for it. Chain slap, OTOH, does nothing harmful other than annoy you.

Of course, you could buy a KTM.




 
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