MX workouts


19 replies to this topic
  • lespaulcustom01

Posted July 13, 2006 - 01:19 PM

#1

I need some workouts that help specifically with motocross, It doesnt take many laps before my arms feel like jello. What can I do to last longer.

  • xcracer123

Posted July 13, 2006 - 01:25 PM

#2

RIDE!!!! The more laps you do the more you'll train those specific muscles and you'll relax more.

  • MX651

Posted July 13, 2006 - 08:20 PM

#3

put it long practice motos, ive been doing 15 minute motos and then 30 minute motos then back to 15 mins for practice and its helped alot, i have tons more endurance and never get tired any more and ive only been doing it for a couple of weeks, also learn how to relax while riding and learning good form does great too.

  • ben_suhard

Posted July 15, 2006 - 10:41 AM

#4

Yep, riding is the best training, although it's not the best training for your bike(they get slower when they train more)! If you race ten minute moto's, practice ten minute moto's, if you race twenty minute moto's, practice twenty minute moto's, and so on.

  • amnesia622

Posted July 16, 2006 - 07:22 PM

#5

Off the track I can recommend the following.

1. Cycling for 1 hour on a regular basis. Any longer is catabolic. Cycling is good for mx because it is low impact (compared to running) Let your body get beat up on the track, not training. benefits: stronger cardiovascular strength. Increased VO2 max.

2. In the gym lots of core work. (squats, deadlifts, situps, ect) here is a good link. http://www.americanp...t/view/614/221/ benefits: injury prevention, stronger lower back, better posture, ability to be stronger, more powerful and have more endurance. I could go on and on.

3. For weight lifting circuit training. This means doing many exercises back to back. A good example is like for a chest workout do incline bench to dips to flys. Rest 90 seconds. Do it again for 3 sets and work upto 4. benifits: Same, able to be stronger, have more endurance, build muscle.

4. DIET. This doenst mean dont eat food. This means eat lots of the RIGHT foods. This could be a 100 page book but this is the simplest way I can put it.
"but the basic concepts are based on a common sense approach: Eat enough whole foods to maintain activity and recovery, but not enough to support body fat. Though there are many subtleties to a well-honed diet, it basically boils down to that simple sentence. Base your diet on fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, whole grains and heart-healthy fats (monounsaturated fat such as that found in olive oil and avocados, and omega 3 fats such as those found in cold-water fish like salmon). For people who have no medical reason to abstain from certain macro-nutrients, the approach should be to vary your diet within a broad range of minimally processed foods, balancing individual meals with sufficient levels of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Beyond that, it is mostly a matter of tweaking your existing knowledge in relation to what you find to be your essential dietary needs." I personally eat 5 measured meals a day every 2.5-3 hours.



There are tons of things you can do but I think above I listed the essentials. Also relax on the bike, lose the death grip and focus on hanging on by pinching your knees tight.

  • nfrcr31

Posted July 17, 2006 - 11:35 PM

#6

Off the track I can recommend the following.

1. Cycling for 1 hour on a regular basis. Any longer is catabolic. Cycling is good for mx because it is low impact (compared to running) Let your body get beat up on the track, not training. benefits: stronger cardiovascular strength. Increased VO2 max.

2. In the gym lots of core work. (squats, deadlifts, situps, ect) here is a good link. http://www.americanp...t/view/614/221/ benefits: injury prevention, stronger lower back, better posture, ability to be stronger, more powerful and have more endurance. I could go on and on.

3. For weight lifting circuit training. This means doing many exercises back to back. A good example is like for a chest workout do incline bench to dips to flys. Rest 90 seconds. Do it again for 3 sets and work upto 4. benifits: Same, able to be stronger, have more endurance, build muscle.

4. DIET. This doenst mean dont eat food. This means eat lots of the RIGHT foods. This could be a 100 page book but this is the simplest way I can put it.
"but the basic concepts are based on a common sense approach: Eat enough whole foods to maintain activity and recovery, but not enough to support body fat. Though there are many subtleties to a well-honed diet, it basically boils down to that simple sentence. Base your diet on fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, whole grains and heart-healthy fats (monounsaturated fat such as that found in olive oil and avocados, and omega 3 fats such as those found in cold-water fish like salmon). For people who have no medical reason to abstain from certain macro-nutrients, the approach should be to vary your diet within a broad range of minimally processed foods, balancing individual meals with sufficient levels of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Beyond that, it is mostly a matter of tweaking your existing knowledge in relation to what you find to be your essential dietary needs." I personally eat 5 measured meals a day every 2.5-3 hours.



There are tons of things you can do but I think above I listed the essentials. Also relax on the bike, lose the death grip and focus on hanging on by pinching your knees tight.



Well put!!!!

  • AbandonedMX

Posted July 24, 2006 - 12:31 AM

#7

Well I am no fitness expert but this is what I do when I am not out riding.
5 mile bike ride (great for the legs and is relaxing), 1 mile on tredmile (sp?), Get a small dumbell and stand there and hold it out in front of you (one arm at a time and this should help with arm pump), and lots of other leg workouts. But most of all before a good ride, get rest! It is the best to make you ride better. Eat bananas before a ride to help so you don't get cramps and that is all I do.
[Abandoned]

  • udogu

Posted July 31, 2006 - 05:22 PM

#8

A622, you mentioned cycling beyond one hour as being catabolic. I think that means that you begin to consume muscle tissue at that point. I am also a cyclist in addition to riding MX. Some of my rides are 5 hours long covering upwards of 100 miles. Is this harmful to my MX conditioning or can I stay out of this catabolic state by eating consistently while I am riding and by eating properly after the long rides? I'll admit that the sprint of the first lap or two of a MX race sometimes leaves me sucking air. You seem to be well informed in aspects of training, can a guy be a MXer and a cyclist without diminishing his performance in either? Thanks for the input.

  • LeFrog

Posted July 31, 2006 - 06:46 PM

#9

The "just ride" advice is not totally wrong BUT motocross is not a complete sport.

If you are out of shape, then obviously you need a good all-around workout to get back into shape so that you can ride without getting hurt and also get the max out of the bike.

If you are competitive, then look at the pros: look at Carmichael before and now. Stewart is muscular too. Look at DV: if he hit the gym a bit more, no doubt he would still be in the top 5. He let himself go and lost his natural 20-year old good shape and pack on the pounds and he barely maintains himself in the top 10.

So, if you want to ride and recuperate faster, some good all-around workout (resistance, cardio, stretching) is not such a bad idea.

  • amnesia622

Posted October 17, 2006 - 07:54 PM

#10

A622, you mentioned cycling beyond one hour as being catabolic. I think that means that you begin to consume muscle tissue at that point. I am also a cyclist in addition to riding MX. Some of my rides are 5 hours long covering upwards of 100 miles. Is this harmful to my MX conditioning or can I stay out of this catabolic state by eating consistently while I am riding and by eating properly after the long rides? I'll admit that the sprint of the first lap or two of a MX race sometimes leaves me sucking air. You seem to be well informed in aspects of training, can a guy be a MXer and a cyclist without diminishing his performance in either? Thanks for the input.


wow sorry I never replied. The 5 hour rides are not beneficial. You can accomplish the same in 2 to 3 hours as you can 5. How many hours a week are you getting on the cycle? I'm going to assume you are getting 5-7 hours a week on the saddle pedaling. Unless you are a cat 1/2 rider I don’t see how a ride that long can be beneficial to building speed. Your longest cycling race wouldn’t be this long. The reasoning is do you know how long your body needs to recover from such a ride? It’s totally depleting your body of glycogen that’s going to take a few days to replenish among other things thus making you take a few days off where you could be training.

Can a guy be a MX rider and a cyclist? No it’s one or the other. You can’t competitively race both and be competitive. Cycling certainly helps MX but I think too much attention is now being put on training for MX off the bike.

Best advice I can give is train off the mx bike for injury prevention. (core work and multi joint exercises(shoulder presses, squats, deadlifts, clean and press, pullups, benchpress, medicine ball situps, planks, lunges, hyperextensions, rows, dips, pushups))

MX is a SKILL SPORT. To get skilled you have to ride. If you have a limited time schedule where its either go to the gym or ride… the choice should be obvious, ride the bike get all the time in possible.

  • Utah Joe

Posted October 19, 2006 - 10:36 AM

#11

amnesia622, Since you seem to know your stuff I wonder if you could offer me your opinion of my workout. I am currently doing what you mentioned about the diet stuff. Eating 5 meals a day, lots of fruit and vegtables, etc. It has worked very well and I have lost about 18 lbs in about 6 weeks. However, I wonder if I could be doing better at the gym. I try to go at least 4 days a week. I start by doing about 30 minutes of cardio. I have a heartrate monitor and I try to keep myself above 70% 150-160. Then I will lift. I do 3 chest workouts, 3 back workouts, 2 shoulder workouts, 2 triceps, 2 biceps, 2 leg workouts, then I will normally do 2 or 3 abs workouts. For each one, I will do 3 sets. Benchpress for instance; I will do 12-15 reps for my first set, then wait 5 seconds, then the next set I will do as many as I can and then wait another 5 seconds, then do as many as I can for the final set. If I get over 10 reps for the every set I will raise the weight. But I try to keep my heart rate above ~125 or so for the time I am lifting.

  • amnesia622

Posted October 19, 2006 - 07:52 PM

#12

Congrats on the weight loss! What are your goals? To build muscle and a good body or train for mx? Do you do all these exercises in one visit to the gym? or is it split up over the 4 days (I hope so).

Before I broke my leg my routine was: The goal of the time in the gym was to touch (workout) all my muscles with power exercises and multijoint exercises and build a strong core. I mixed it up but this is generally how it went down. I was at the point of changing it up cause it had been 4 weeks of this before injury. Now I’m in more of a bodybuilding routine for upper body since I cant work legs.

You should be in and out in 30-40 minutes.

Day 1: Hell day
5 min warmup (elliptical machine)
Pullups (10,10,8,6) superseted with Pushups 15x4 90 seconds rest between sets
Squats (15,12,12,12) or sometimes only 135lbs with sets of 20 reps for 4 sets. 2 minutes of rest between sets
Medicine ball situps. (Explode up throwing the ball against the wall and having it bounce back and resist it as you go back down) 4 sets of 20 reps 2 min rest between sets

Take a day off

Day 2:
5 min warmup (elliptical machine)
Shoulder press or clean and press
Dips sets of 15 for 4 sets if it (gets easy do them slower)
Curls (12,10,10,10) (if you are feeling good superset the dips and curls 90 seconds rest between sets if superseting 60 if not)
Deadlifts 3 sets 2 min rest between sets

Take a day off

Day 3: more of a focus on stability and core make it a fun but productive day
5 min warmup
Lunges (I do these holding dumbbells sets of 20 alternating left and right for a total of 10 per side per set)
Hyperextensions (depends how I feel from dead lifts could overdo this)
Planks (sit in a pushup position for a time that challenges you do this 3 times)
Side planks (hold yourself up on your side with your arm)
Bridges over one of the swiss balls
Rope Crunches
Roman chairs (put your arms in the slings on the pullup bar and pull your knees twards you shoulders)

Rest of the days take it easy or ride. 3 days a week is almost too much time in the gym.

  • Utah Joe

Posted October 20, 2006 - 09:31 AM

#13

you broke you leg too huh? I got mine back in June, Compound of my tib/fib.

My main goal is lose body fat. About 10 years ago (when I was 20) I weighed about 285lbs and I am 5'10". I went on a big diet and did alot of excersise and got down to 195. Which was great, but now I work in an office and with breaking my leg I got back up about 230. So my goal is to get leaner basicly.

  • 2whlrcr

Posted October 20, 2006 - 02:01 PM

#14

Can a guy be a MX rider and a cyclist? No it’s one or the other. You can’t competitively race both and be competitive. Cycling certainly helps MX but I think too much attention is now being put on training for MX off the bike.


Jeff Ward used to be a very competent cyclist. I'm not sure if he ever raced, but he trained with USCF racers. I personally think you could be both, especially at the lower levels (amateur B or A class and USCF Cat V/IV, III), but this would take several or more years of hard dedicated training, for you body to adapt to the stresses. The training that Charmichal or Lance Armstrong can do, is far beyond what normal weekend athletes can sustain, because they have been doing it for so many years.

I'm an ex USCF II road racer and try and train 7-10 hours a week or so on my bicycle (half of what I used to train, when racing bicycles). I race primarily hare scrambles and enduros, which are two hour events or longer. I rarely ride my bicycle more than two hours anymore. Mostly because of time constraints.

I feel a typical amatuer MX'er would benift from about 5 hours a week or so of cycling. A QUALITY hour of cycling, frequently, will go a long way towards conditioning.

  • audacity

Posted October 20, 2006 - 04:35 PM

#15

i know most pro road and mx racers could pull off a winning a cat 5or4 race no problem. being a winning 3 does take time and would pull from anything else your doing.

if nothing else, cycling will show you all about suffering! even at any level of the sport damn near.

sound like you are doing a good job utah joe...keep up the good work. i would keep you reps higher...or increase rest time to lift more weight.

there has been some good posts here...

  • SoCalrider21

Posted October 20, 2006 - 08:09 PM

#16

I think the best thing for arm pump was just practice time. It used to get to me after just a little bit, now I don't even get it anymore. I work out almost everyday, lift weights and I ride my bike to school (which will end in a few weeks when I get my lisence:busted: ).

  • 2whlrcr

Posted October 21, 2006 - 10:41 AM

#17

if nothing else, cycling will show you all about suffering! even at any level of the sport damn near.


Boy isn't that the truth! Most of these guys don't know what suffering is, until they have raced a bicycle race, triathalon or a XC ski race.:devil:

  • Utah Joe

Posted October 26, 2006 - 09:16 AM

#18

So I went and had my BMI checked at the gym last night. They have one of those things that you squeeze and its spits out a number. Back in march when I started (and before I broke my leg) it was 26.3, last night it was 21.2. My weight dropped from 241 to 223 in the past I guess 7 weeks now. So I dont know if those number mean anything, but I guess its an improvement. They told me its still a bit high though, which I belive since I am still about 20+ or so pounds from where I would like to be. Does anyone have any use for those BMI #'s or are they bs?

  • LeFrog

Posted October 26, 2006 - 04:37 PM

#19

So I went and had my BMI checked at the gym last night. They have one of those things that you squeeze and its spits out a number. Back in march when I started (and before I broke my leg) it was 26.3, last night it was 21.2. My weight dropped from 241 to 223 in the past I guess 7 weeks now. So I dont know if those number mean anything, but I guess its an improvement. They told me its still a bit high though, which I belive since I am still about 20+ or so pounds from where I would like to be. Does anyone have any use for those BMI #'s or are they bs?


That's not your BMI, it's your body fat percentage and it is not always accurate, especially the ones you hold in your hands. Some personal scales have such system and they are a bit more accurate.

21% is fine, you can go down to around 18%, which is healthy.

  • Utah Joe

Posted October 27, 2006 - 05:58 AM

#20

That's not your BMI, it's your body fat percentage and it is not always accurate, especially the ones you hold in your hands. Some personal scales have such system and they are a bit more accurate.

21% is fine, you can go down to around 18%, which is healthy.


ah ok. I didn't think it was too accurate, but I was happy that at least (using the same method) I am improving. But I could tell more by my pants anyway, so I never put a ton of stock in that thing.





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