1972 Yahama Enduro Questions


22 replies to this topic
  • hsncmx

Posted July 05, 2006 - 06:53 AM

#1

Hi All,
My brother and I went to our mom's house this weekend and decided to roll out his old 1972 Yahama Enduro motorcycle. It hadn't been started in at least 10 years. Fortunately the gas tank had been drained so the carb we pretty clean. Anyway, with a carb cleaning, fresh gas, new spark plug and new oil, it actually started up after 20 cranks or so. So now the questions. We drained the oil out of the two drain plugs, but noticed that there is a resovoir below the seat on the left side with a view window. That did not drain, so does anyone know what that oil is for and how do you drain it? Next the foam part of the airfilter disintegrated, so I would need a new one of those, plus it burned oil pretty bad so I need a new top end, any ideas where I could get a new air filter and/or top end? Any help is appreciated.

  • dorkpunch

Posted July 05, 2006 - 08:39 AM

#2

your bike is a TWO STROKE. it burns oil to lubricate the engine. the tank under the seat is for TWO STROKE INJECTOR OIL. if the oil runs out, the engine dies. sounds like its an old DT-1 or a DT 250. Dont drain the oil!

  • hsncmx

Posted July 05, 2006 - 08:53 AM

#3

Thanks, it is a 250cc. Do you have any idea on where to get parts?

  • dorkpunch

Posted July 05, 2006 - 09:28 AM

#4

best bet is ebay and salvage yards.

  • BAJAHUSKYS

Posted July 05, 2006 - 02:34 PM

#5

Look around at Vintage racing clubs in your area. The DTs are still raced often. It sounds like either a hone job or bore job with new piston and rings. Check the oil line leading from your oil storage container under the seat to the injector on the right side of the cases. Make sure it is pliable and not stiff or cracked. If you need to replace it, consider clear line. Makes seeing blockages easier in the future. Thats a good trail bike you have there. Take care of it. Steny :ride:

  • dorkpunch

Posted July 05, 2006 - 03:02 PM

#6

as an afterthought- check your compression. any bike thats sat for a long time will usually be very smokey the first time its started. if the comp is low and/or it stays really smokey, you *might* need a top end job. you can also adjust the injector to supply less oil and hence less smoke. it was probably set to run 32:1 and with todays oils you really dont need that. i run 40 to 50:1 in all of my two strokes, but again, thats a matter of opinion.

  • Mike38

Posted July 05, 2006 - 05:50 PM

#7

The oil you drained from the bottom of the case is transmission oil. Don't use 2 stroke oil, or regular motor oil. Use Yamaha tranny fluid. The oil in the small tank under the seat is what was said earlier, injector oil. It lubes the piston. Being that the injector oil is 20 years old, I'd drain it and put in new. Back in 1974 I bought a brand new Yamaha DT100. My first new bike. I ran Yamalube injector oil in it. I think they still sell it.

  • OLD TIME BIKER

Posted July 06, 2006 - 08:40 AM

#8

If you are sure of the year, the bike is a DT2 enduro, it is first year of the second generation of the Yamaha enduro's. It was the first model year with reed valve or "seven-port" induction. You've got a great little vintage dual purpose bike there. Parts are more available than you might think. Check out the links on the AHRMA website for specialists in old Yamaha parts. If your local yamaha dealer has been around for several years he should still have the micro fiche parts lists and it is surprising how many things are still available from Yamaha. One thing I would change without question on a bike that has been sitting for so long are the crank seals. Maintainig a good seal of the crankcase is essential to the health of the engine. If you plan to ride the bike strictly off road, I'd also consider removing the oil injection and runnig pre-mix fuel. Good luck with the bike, I'll check back if you have any questions you want to post, I've got alot of experience with those old Yamaha singles. One place you might find helpful for parts is a place called "Enduro Classics" in Culpepper Virginia. That's all the info I have at this time.

  • originaldirt

Posted July 06, 2006 - 09:04 AM

#9

Here are 2 very good sources for Vintage Yamaha Enduro parts. Both have bought up dealer inventories for the past 25 years.

The Cycle Center
13388 Lovers Lane
Culpepper, VA 22701
540-825-5544; fax 540-825-6115

and www.yamatopdog.com

OriginalDirt

  • Mike38

Posted July 06, 2006 - 02:35 PM

#10

One thing I would change without question on a bike that has been sitting for so long are the crank seals.


Very, very good piont! There is nothing that will lock up a two stroke piston faster then sucking air threw a cracked main bearing seal.

Well, maybe running it without oil would be faster :ride:

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  • hsncmx

Posted July 07, 2006 - 06:46 AM

#11

Thanks for all the info, folks, I really appreciate it. It will be a long project as the bike still sits 250 miles away at my moms house.

  • hsncmx

Posted July 07, 2006 - 09:40 AM

#12

If you are sure of the year, the bike is a DT2 enduro, it is first year of the second generation of the Yamaha enduro's. It was the first model year with reed valve or "seven-port" induction. You've got a great little vintage dual purpose bike there. Parts are more available than you might think. Check out the links on the AHRMA website for specialists in old Yamaha parts. If your local yamaha dealer has been around for several years he should still have the micro fiche parts lists and it is surprising how many things are still available from Yamaha. One thing I would change without question on a bike that has been sitting for so long are the crank seals. Maintainig a good seal of the crankcase is essential to the health of the engine. If you plan to ride the bike strictly off road, I'd also consider removing the oil injection and runnig pre-mix fuel. Good luck with the bike, I'll check back if you have any questions you want to post, I've got alot of experience with those old Yamaha singles. One place you might find helpful for parts is a place called "Enduro Classics" in Culpepper Virginia. That's all the info I have at this time.



If I'm not sure of the year, is there anything on the bike that would determine whether or not it is a DT2 or a DT250? I have seen a picture of a 73 DT250 and it look exactly like it, except mine is orange. Does it really matter parts wise whether or not it is a DT2 or DT250?

  • dorkpunch

Posted July 07, 2006 - 09:58 AM

#13

the first three numbers of the vin should tell you exactly what it is. post them here or you can do a search on the web, theres a couple of places that have lists for identifying yamahas. pics would be VERY helpfull... is it orange and white with silver fenders? my DT 250 is a '76 and its the orange and white one...

  • hsncmx

Posted July 07, 2006 - 10:16 AM

#14

the first three numbers of the vin should tell you exactly what it is. post them here or you can do a search on the web, theres a couple of places that have lists for identifying yamahas. pics would be VERY helpfull... is it orange and white with silver fenders? my DT 250 is a '76 and its the orange and white one...


Yep, Orange and white w/ silver fenders. I'll take some good pictures the next time I visit my mother. So, it will probably be sometime in August before I get back there. I'll post back once I get some pictures and more info on the VIN. I assume the VIN is on the steering column somewhere, similar to where they are now on Yamaha's?

  • dorkpunch

Posted July 07, 2006 - 10:33 AM

#15

If it looks like this, its probably a '75 or a '76. the numbers are on the steering stem.

Posted Image

  • hsncmx

Posted July 07, 2006 - 11:39 AM

#16

If it looks like this, its probably a '75 or a '76. the numbers are on the steering stem.

Posted Image


I'm prett confident that it is a '72 or '73, my brother had it in high school and he graduated in 1974. I'll know more when I get the VIN.

  • OLD TIME BIKER

Posted July 08, 2006 - 02:30 PM

#17

The vin is on the motor as well, the motor number and the frame number should match. If they don't, you have a "bitsa", meaning that the bike was pieced together from "bits of this one and bits of that one". If that should be the case, post both numbers and we'll find out the model frame and model engine you have. If the number starts DT1F, don't panic many of the early DT2's number prefix started DT1F.

  • hsncmx

Posted August 14, 2006 - 04:33 AM

#18

Hi all,
I went to my mom's house this weekend and did a little bit of work on the bike. I replace the injector oil and rode me and my son on it for awhile. It was fun, my son had a blast. I took the VIN number from the steering column to the local Yamaha shop, but they weren't too much help. I couldn't find any numbers on the engine because I wasn't sure where to look and it was pretty dirty. Anyway, the VIN of the steering column is DT1F-121589. So, if anyone can help me garner any information from this VIN I would appreciate it. I will need to put on new tires and turn signals and I also noticed that the brake light plunger attached to the brake pedal is broke. Ahhh the fun of restoring an old bike. Here is a link to a picture that I put on My Garage. Hope it works.
http://www.thumperta...ehicle&vid=6466

  • OLD TIME BIKER

Posted August 25, 2006 - 10:07 PM

#19

I'm positive it's a '72, with the DT1F prefix to the vin and the photo, I'm sure. Your local Yamaha dealer should be able to order alot of parts for you, all you have to do is get your hands on a parts book to supply him with part numbers. Some parts will be no longer available, and some part numbers will be superseded by new part numbers, but the parts are the same or interchangeable. The dealer should have either a computer disc that has parts lists and blow up diagrams, or the old microfiche, or access to one or the other. Like I said, you'll be surprised how many parts are still available direct from Yamaha.
Don't let the parts guy's pull your chain, it's his job to help you and locate parts for you. Remind him that in addition to the "obsolete" parts he isn't fond of locating for you, you're also going to need tires and tubes and 2 stroke oil and gear oil and new handlebar grips and chain lube and eventually some new riding gear, etc. and if his dealership can't help you with the restoration of your DT-2, why should you give him ANY of your business! Better yet, ask to see his boss and remind him. Slowly but surely the dealers are beginning to realize that there is a market for vintage parts. Sometimes they need to have their nose rubbed in it!

  • CFM56-7

Posted July 07, 2007 - 09:54 PM

#20

I am a beginner, lazy, suck at riding and am older then most on the trails. I installed a Rekluse Pro on my 2003 YZ450F and run Rotella T oil (I like how the clutch engages better then with Yamalube.) Anyway, I ride for fun not to prove how bad I am and the auto clutch is the best mod I’ve tried or installed. The crappier the trail the better the clutch works and I've never fried anything, run a low gear in the tight stuff and change the oil often.




 
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