front tire wash


18 replies to this topic
  • blue450frider

Posted June 26, 2006 - 09:48 AM

#1

when i am riding through berms every once in a while my front tire washes out what can i do to prevent it?

  • BergArabia

Posted June 26, 2006 - 10:02 AM

#2

Some riders get good results by swapping out the stock tire for another.

http://www.thumperta...46&parentpage=6

  • WFOracer

Posted June 26, 2006 - 10:08 AM

#3

Ride it harder with less front brake....mess around with your suspension.

Oh yeah, that stock tire is garbage, try a dunlop 756. Worked for me

  • ben_suhard

Posted June 26, 2006 - 11:30 AM

#4

This may sound wrong, but get as far forward as you can for corners. I'd heard this so many times, but it took me a while before I actually believed it and tried it with commitment. By sitting forward, more weight is placed on the front end, which steepens the head angle because the fork springs are compressed which gives you sharper steering. It also gives the front tyre more grip because the tyre is squashed more which gives it a bigger footprint. When the rear end spins up and steps out, it's easier to control because your body position is less affected. Take Oval track Speedway racers as an example. Try it, it may sound crazy, but it's really the best way to corner, whether it's a high speed (power slide) corner or a tight trail corner(or in between).

  • mxrayser

Posted June 26, 2006 - 01:54 PM

#5

This may sound wrong, but get as far forward as you can for corners. I'd heard this so many times, but it took me a while before I actually believed it and tried it with commitment. By sitting forward, more weight is placed on the front end, which steepens the head angle because the fork springs are compressed which gives you sharper steering. It also gives the front tyre more grip because the tyre is squashed more which gives it a bigger footprint. When the rear end spins up and steps out, it's easier to control because your body position is less affected. Take Oval track Speedway racers as an example. Try it, it may sound crazy, but it's really the best way to corner, whether it's a high speed (power slide) corner or a tight trail corner(or in between).

He's right,moving up on the seat gives me more front control, and the weight up front helps on high throttle exits too

  • flintlock28

Posted June 26, 2006 - 02:21 PM

#6

Ditto what ben stated.........plus if you're runing a stock Dunlop 739, switch to a Dunlop 756 up front.

  • stock510

Posted June 26, 2006 - 04:10 PM

#7

Get as far forward as you can, weight your outside peg and tip it over, dont forget to get your inside leg out :excuseme:

  • NYMXer

Posted June 26, 2006 - 05:05 PM

#8

Dragging the front brake a little helps hold the front end too. Try it sometime. :excuseme:

  • Zique

Posted June 26, 2006 - 10:43 PM

#9

Dragging the front brake a little helps hold the front end too. Try it sometime. :bonk:

Really? I was told to slightly drag the rear brake and stay off the front completely... :excuseme:

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  • flipsoft

Posted June 26, 2006 - 10:59 PM

#10

I would second staying off the front brake, and getting a better tire, but the biggest thing is climbing high on the seat.
I get to where I am almost on top of the tank. Gives me so much more control and you will find that you can take turns faster.

Watch videos of pros cornering and try to mimic thier positions on the bikes. This helped for me a lot.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Check out his position here. It is a really extreme turn but you will get the idea.

-flipsoft

  • NYMXer

Posted June 27, 2006 - 03:44 AM

#11

Really? I was told to slightly drag the rear brake


Next time you go out and ride.............try it for yourself. Dragging the front brake in a rutted turn works great. It also works in any turn too.
:excuseme:

  • moochie

Posted June 27, 2006 - 07:28 AM

#12

Next time you go out and ride.............try it for yourself. Dragging the front brake in a rutted turn works great. It also works in any turn too.
:excuseme:


That is definitely a good technique to use in a rutted corner as it will help keep the tire tracking inside the rut....are you certain that is something that will work in a flat corner?

  • LJ

Posted June 27, 2006 - 07:33 AM

#13

Draging the front break works great at helping you place the front tire where you want. It also helps keeping the front tire from jumping out of a corner.

Draging the rear break helps the front end from washing out. Gary Semics describes it as pulling the front "in" to the corner.

On a flat corner, it is useful to lean the bike over (while your body is more upright) and putting the crack of your a$$ on the outside edge of your seat while waiting the outside peg.

On bermed corners, you can lean with the bike

Getting as far forward helps too.

Also, standing up all the way to the apex of the turn and then sitting is useful to help with breaking bumps going into the turn. It also helps because it is easier to throw yourself as far forward as possible when you sit down to turn at the apex.

  • BergArabia

Posted June 27, 2006 - 09:25 AM

#14

That is all cool advice.
A question from a non-MXer.
riding in sand, virgin dunes with a little bit a crust on the top and soft underneath.
I try to keep up far on the tank like you guys say.
I have come off a few times when the tire digs in.
I have never really got that putting the front leg out thing.
Would that work in sand the same as on a track?

  • 821

Posted June 27, 2006 - 11:53 AM

#15

To follow up on what lj said about standing to the apex; this also helps with allowing the bike to maintain itself up in the suspension stroke. If you sit into a choppy corner your bike will bounce up and down causing a front end push if you are trrying to turn when the bike is rebounding back up. Stand going in, lean the bike over with your legs like a skier as you approach, at the apex sit down in a forward position. This will lower your bikes center of gravity at the right moment making it easier to turn. You can pull the clutch a little to allow the bike to dip even more. You will be through the turn before you know it. Sitting to the outside of the seat helps both tires bite a little better as well. Try this on that flat turn that always causes you to wash out.

  • Nitroused383

Posted June 27, 2006 - 02:41 PM

#16

You said you ride in sand. Well i just noticed after turning my front clickers out a bunch cr 14 reb 16, my front tire washes more. For the sand i suggest you try turning in your clickers quite a bit, you will be suprised. :excuseme:

  • SurvivorMan

Posted June 27, 2006 - 08:28 PM

#17

Have you had your suspension worked on? Have you set your sag and if so are your springs in the shock and forks the correct size? The stock valving is excellent, however, the springs need to be set up properly for your weight. If the springs are out then your bike stance or geometry is out, causing bad steering.
I agree with the 756, but get the larger 90 over the 80. When are you coming on with the throttle? You said sometimes the front end washes. Roll on the throttle earlier. Could be many different things, cornering fast is very difficult. Keep at it.

  • ben_suhard

Posted June 28, 2006 - 08:14 AM

#18

That is all cool advice.
A question from a non-MXer. riding in sand, virgin dunes with a little bit a crust on the top and soft underneath. I try to keep up far on the tank like you guys say.I have come off a few times when the tire digs in. I have never really got that putting the front leg out thing. Would that work in sand the same as on a track?

Sand riding is probably the most difficult, especially cornering, coz the surface the tyre knobs are biting into is very unstable. If you can, and this works on any type of surface, keep your speed up so that you can use the gyro effect of the wheels to help you balance, I'm pretty sure the gyro starts working at about 22kph(I read that somewhere, years ago). Definitely practice putting your leg out front, it puts weight towards the front end to help the tyre bite and helps you balance. As your bike's position changes(when it washes out and wallows around in the sand), you can move your leg around to compensate. Sometimes you can get away with keeping both feet on the pegs, other times your inside leg can be used as a counter weight. One of my local riding areas is very sandy, and I hardly use the front brake at all when cornering, it's just too risky, especially at high speeds when you're tired. Keep practicing, sand is very tricky and demanding, but also can be very enjoyable.

  • ben_suhard

Posted June 28, 2006 - 09:51 AM

#19

when i am riding through berms every once in a while my front tire washes out what can i do to prevent it?

One other thing, don't forget to counter-steer(turning the front wheel outwards) when you need to(like the Oval flat-trackers do).





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