Biulding Enclosed Trailer?


12 replies to this topic
  • Way Fast Whitey

Posted 23 June 2006 - 09:47 AM

#1

anybody ever do it?

i was thinking about building some sort of frame then make a little frame to go over the bikes but what what i use to cover it, or make it enclosed?

anybody know if i can buy those rounded peices to go on the edges/corners then get the thin sheet metal and cover the plywood with that?

any other ideas?

thanks :excuseme:

  • Fulch13

Posted 23 June 2006 - 12:49 PM

#2

You're quickly going to run into a higher cost than you could just buy a trailer for. Around here, you can get 5x8 factory-built enclosed trailers for around $800 used. If you're going to build a trailer, you'll spend close to that in just sheet metal to cover it with.

  • tenis24

Posted 23 June 2006 - 01:18 PM

#3

and it will look home made.

  • Way Fast Whitey

Posted 23 June 2006 - 01:31 PM

#4

You're quickly going to run into a higher cost than you could just buy a trailer for. Around here, you can get 5x8 factory-built enclosed trailers for around $800 used. If you're going to build a trailer, you'll spend close to that in just sheet metal to cover it with.


i've been looking in the classifeids but everybody asks like $300 less than brand new. and i only want to spend like $1000.

and it will look homemade


thats true too :excuseme:

  • aedwards07

Posted 23 June 2006 - 06:33 PM

#5

I bought my first 5X8 trailer for 1000 brand new.Ramp door and all.

  • brichard82

Posted 23 June 2006 - 07:57 PM

#6

just got through building one myself and i only had like 1300-1400 total! did i mention that its a 8 x 14?!?!!! but then again i am a welder by profession, but not that hard to do. we have a local trailer supply warehouse that i got all my parts from. even put a rooftop a/c and 12 volt wench hanging from the ceiling to hoist the door up and disconnect the cable when its down so no one gets closelined by the regular spring assist cables that normally come with a ramp door.

  • Way Fast Whitey

Posted 24 June 2006 - 04:46 PM

#7

got any pics?

  • brichard82

Posted 25 June 2006 - 11:16 AM

#8

just took some with my camera but its not digital so i am going to get them devolped and put on a cd.should post them in a day or so.

  • Way Fast Whitey

Posted 25 June 2006 - 05:10 PM

#9

ok thank-you

  • 10guy

Posted 25 June 2006 - 07:59 PM

#10

I've built a few enclosed trailers. While the radiused corners can be purchased from trailer suppliers, they can be pricey.

From what you have said here I think you would be much better off buying one, if you really want/have to build one then go look at some for ideas but not to be rude or anything but it doesn't sound like you have the experience/skills to tackle this project.

  • Way Fast Whitey

Posted 26 June 2006 - 08:32 AM

#11

I've built a few enclosed trailers. While the radiused corners can be purchased from trailer suppliers, they can be pricey.

From what you have said here I think you would be much better off buying one, if you really want/have to build one then go look at some for ideas but not to be rude or anything but it doesn't sound like you have the experience/skills to tackle this project.


well not to be rude but i've biult alot of things out of both wood and metal. so i could do it. BTW what would give you the impression i don't have the skills to biuld it? :excuseme:

  • WMRRA13

Posted 26 June 2006 - 02:08 PM

#12

BTW what would give you the impression i don't have the skills to biuld it? :excuseme:



Location: Manitoba

;-)


-Tyler

  • 10guy

Posted 26 June 2006 - 06:58 PM

#13

The only plywood needed/used is the flooring and maybe as an interior wall covering (also acts to stiffen the frame).

Standard attachment used to be rivets but lately people have started to use the new epoxies to glue the sheet metal to the frame.

I believe in the steel frame method over wood studs (yes some individuals still use wood here but none of the major builders do).

You can save a bunch of weight by going with aluminum sheet metal instead of steel for the walls. Also for the ceiling if you don't want to use fiberglass for interior lighting.

Go wide on the axle and beefy on the tires.

V nose will pull better then the standard flat nose.

If you build strong on the trailer frame you can go lighter on the wall construction but if you go light on the main frame you will end up using some of the strength of the walls for rigidity.

If a person could get a hold of some of that aluminum/polystyrene panels they use in the construction of campers it would make for a very strong, light wall.

Polar is a company that sells those radius corners you were referring to.

If you stratigically place a few cabinets in the upper corners you can do wonders to the strength of the box.

Don't just build 90* studs, remember to triangulate.

If you feel confident in your ability to construct a safe vehicle then by all means go for it.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

Register Close
If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.