Offroading a YZ?


19 replies to this topic
  • TWILES

Posted June 19, 2006 - 09:57 AM

#1

I have a 2005 WR450 now and I am thinking my next bike will be a YZ450. The WR is great but I'd like a little less weight and I like to ride on MX tracks too so I think the YZ would be better. I saw where you can get a heavier flywheel for the YZ for offroad riding and I would like to know if it really does that much good and if there is anything else the bike would need?

  • WFOracer

Posted June 19, 2006 - 10:04 AM

#2

You would definitely want a heavier flywheel weight. A skid plate to protect your engine would be a good idea too.

The '06 has the 5 speed in it, so it'd be great for woods. I haven't had a chance to try mine in the woods yet.

Go ge it! :excuseme:

  • Milhaus

Posted June 19, 2006 - 12:38 PM

#3

If you sprocket down in the front and/or sprocket up in the rear, the YZ makes a great woods platform. In the older models the YZ came with a nicer factory suspension, not sure if they are equal now or not. E-start is nice for a woods bike though.

  • bluerider31

Posted June 19, 2006 - 04:58 PM

#4

I have an 06 yz450 and it is great in the woods. I had a 250 two stroke and I am faster on the 450. I would ad a rekluse clutch on a 450. I have a rekluse and it is the best mod ever.

  • 3TV

Posted June 19, 2006 - 05:32 PM

#5

I have a '06 YZF and it works good offroad. I don't see why you would "definitely want" a heavier flywheel for it. I like the quick snappy power when you give it the gas, and after a day in the saddle I got used to the brakes and don't have problems due to stalling the motor. I'd say just buy it and ride it, then decide if you need to add weight to the flywheel, or add an auto clutch.

  • TWILES

Posted June 19, 2006 - 05:49 PM

#6

I have a '06 YZF and it works good offroad. I don't see why you would "definitely want" a heavier flywheel for it. I like the quick snappy power when you give it the gas, and after a day in the saddle I got used to the brakes and don't have problems due to stalling the motor. I'd say just buy it and ride it, then decide if you need to add weight to the flywheel, or add an auto clutch.

Thats probably what I'll do. It'll be next year or mabey late this year. I liked riding my Banshee in the woods a lot more than my 450R when it was mine. The snappy power is more what I am used to. Don't get me wrong, I love the WR but a little more sporty would be better. On the flywheel, I saw it on the Yamaha site and I guess its the same one that comes on the WR. I've heard its a good thing. I'd like to start racing XC. Thats mainly why I'm asking. I'm doing a little brain storming. Thanks for the info... The more the marrier. :excuseme:

  • dogbone

Posted June 19, 2006 - 06:44 PM

#7

On the flywheel, I saw it on the Yamaha site and I guess its the same one that comes on the WR. I've heard its a good thing.

They are completely different. A YZ flywheel will not fit a WR nowdays.

  • Lowedog

Posted June 19, 2006 - 06:55 PM

#8

I went from a '03 WR450 that I logged 5000 miles on to a '06 YZ450. I only ride woods and some desert. The YZ is so much better than the WR it's amazing! Don't miss the e sart at all and I wouldn't put a flywheel on. The YZ is sooo much lighter. :excuseme: The suspension is a little harsh for the slow choppy stuff. I run my comp clickers full soft and about 105mm sag. Plan on puting on some accumulator tanks soon to try and plush the forks up a bit. I went up 2 teeth to a 51 on the rear and it's about perfect. A little taller than the WR 1st but the close ratio tranny works great for me. Wouldn't mind having the WR's 4th and 5th gear ratios but rarely need that kind of speed anyway. :bonk:

-Lowedog

  • Crabtree426

Posted June 19, 2006 - 08:22 PM

#9

I use my 426 for trail riding. I bought it instead of the WR because of the weight savings and added punch. Electric start would be nice but otherwise I like the YZF. I can only imagine how much lighter the new 450 is.

  • ben_suhard

Posted June 19, 2006 - 08:30 PM

#10

I do MX and off-road, and I like the YZ just the way it is for off-road. All I've added is the Yamaha bash plate, a brake snake, and the WER steering damper off of the KTM I sold(which really needed it). My KTM had a heavier fly wheel, but I much prefer the YZ as it is; it makes my friend's KTM's look real bad when I leave them way behind in the whooped out trails! It feels so light, the suspension and power is perfect. I think the YZ is a great trail machine!

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  • ESC

Posted June 20, 2006 - 06:29 AM

#11

I trail ride my YZ426...I've only been to a track one time. My bike is completely stock. Stock gearing, flywheel, cam, EVERYTHING except ASV levers. I have a lot of fun and don't really see the need for a heavier flywheel or lower gears....just learn to use the machine.

  • SurvivorMan

Posted June 20, 2006 - 09:01 AM

#12

YZ 450's are awesome for offroad racing or aggresive riders. For more casual riders I would recommend the WR. Do not get the rekluse, your clutch is the best tool/weapon on your motorcycle, it just takes time to learn to use (this opinion varies).
I also recommend the 13/51 gearing for woods riding and I am still considering a 10 oz flywheel, but I ride really technical 1st - 2nd gear trails. If I rode more open GNCC style or desert riding I would not touch a flywheel or even lower my gearing.
Lowedog, if your sag is to great (100mm plus) your forks will become harsh because their angle has now increased (choppered out). If you keep your forks more verticle by having a stiffer/higher sag, they will react quicker to the small stuff and the bike will steer faster. But then the downside is the front end can become twichy at high speeds. Enzo does excellent work on Yamaha forks.

  • TWILES

Posted June 20, 2006 - 01:05 PM

#13

YZ 450's are awesome for offroad racing or aggresive riders. For more casual riders I would recommend the WR. Do not get the rekluse, your clutch is the best tool/weapon on your motorcycle, it just takes time to learn to use (this opinion varies).
I also recommend the 13/51 gearing for woods riding and I am still considering a 10 oz flywheel, but I ride really technical 1st - 2nd gear trails. If I rode more open GNCC style or desert riding I would not touch a flywheel or even lower my gearing.
Lowedog, if your sag is to great (100mm plus) your forks will become harsh because their angle has now increased (choppered out). If you keep your forks more verticle by having a stiffer/higher sag, they will react quicker to the small stuff and the bike will steer faster. But then the downside is the front end can become twichy at high speeds. Enzo does excellent work on Yamaha forks.

Some of the guys around here that race XC bought the Rekluse and took it out after a couple of months. The saying that the guys around here could f#ck up a wet dream hold true but another guy who CAN ride took his out too. I know how to use a clutch. I started racing a LT500R when I was 15 and stuck with them with a 250R and Banshee before getting the 450R that is now my wifes. I bought the WR basically to learn to ride bikes. I didn't know I would take to it as fast as I did. Thats the reason I'm looking into a YZ. I'm decent enought to race and the WR doesn't strike me as a serious competitor. If I'm going to get beat it will be because the other guy was better. Not because I'm riding a tank.

  • marcmo0

Posted June 20, 2006 - 01:55 PM

#14

How do you like the WER steering dampener? I am trying to decide which way to go. Everyone is saying Scotts, but would like to explore some other options.

  • Lowedog

Posted June 20, 2006 - 09:48 PM

#15

Lowedog, if your sag is to great (100mm plus) your forks will become harsh because their angle has now increased (choppered out). If you keep your forks more verticle by having a stiffer/higher sag, they will react quicker to the small stuff and the bike will steer faster. But then the downside is the front end can become twichy at high speeds. Enzo does excellent work on Yamaha forks.


Sag is suggestive. Many tuners have varying opinions on the subject. Some will tell you to run up to 110mm for off road. A lot of KTM offroaders run at 120mm. Now were talking a very small amount of differance of 5mm. I prefer to run mine a little greater for a slightly softer ride in the woods. Very few of us will notice the 5mm differance in how the bike handles.

I have built my own subtanks and will have my fittings ready to mount them up tomorrow. We'll see how this works on the sharp edge stuff. Bottom line is the YZ fork is valved too stiff to soak up the small rocks and roots.

-Lowedog

  • BergArabia

Posted June 21, 2006 - 12:47 AM

#16

Do not get the rekluse, your clutch is the best tool/weapon on your motorcycle, it just takes time to learn to use (this opinion varies).



Although I am hardly an expert in this I would endorse the comment about the standard clutch. I ride in the desert up and down dunes with a paddle tire and I find that I can literally ride for hours without stalling the bike (so long as I don't fall off which happens often enough). The clutch gets me over blind dune tops that I don't want to jump over and through tricky bits where I need to take it easy. The clutch does work great, even with the standard weight flywheel which I have I don't have any problems. Just my 2 cents. I suppose riding forest trails might be different I haven't really tried that but for open desert with plenty of dunes the standard setup is fine.

  • ben_suhard

Posted June 21, 2006 - 10:23 AM

#17

Sag is suggestive. Many tuners have varying opinions on the subject. Some will tell you to run up to 110mm for off road. A lot of KTM offroaders run at 120mm.

The main reason guys run 120mm sag on the KTM's is because of the really bad headshake. My 03 525exc had crazy headshake, I started running 120mm sag but I eventually bought a steering damper for it coz it was so scary(and hazardous) at high speeds. The newer KTM's are s'posed to handle better, but I ditched mine for a YZ and I don't think I'll ever buy another KTM. I didn't like the linkage-less rear shock either. I'm running 105mm on the YZ, if you use more sag than that it won't have as sharp steering for the tight stuff.

  • Rocky Jones

Posted June 21, 2006 - 03:13 PM

#18

I agree the yz 450 is a much better trail bike than the wr by leaps and bounds

  • Matty05

Posted June 21, 2006 - 09:55 PM

#19

I agree the yz 450 is a much better trail bike than the wr by leaps and bounds

YZ just needs more fuel, gearing and usual protection.
18" rear tyre has it's advantages off road too, as does E-start.

So, take off the ADR crap and put an exhaust on a WR and you have the perfect trail bike! :excuseme:

Hardcore enduro is a totally different story...........

  • ehooft1247

Posted June 21, 2006 - 10:51 PM

#20

I have an 04 YZ450, my first MC bike. I ride mostly technical trails in the forest and found that the bike had way too much power for my skill level. I added a 12 oz flywheel instead of changing sprockets. It tamed the beast! I still have all the power of the bike, it's just not when I'm not expecting it.





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