torque wrench question...


11 replies to this topic
  • Kritter

Posted May 28, 2006 - 09:39 AM

#1

Looking at getting a snap on in-lb torque wrench...40-200 in-lb should be the range I want correct?

Anybody have any rec's on a particular snap on model? I have a craftsman clicker now and I broke a bolt prepping my bike so I am assuming it is inaccurate.

  • Max Power

Posted May 28, 2006 - 10:16 AM

#2

It's what I use. :applause:

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  • thouk

Posted May 28, 2006 - 02:36 PM

#3

Kris,
Don't assume that it was the wrench. If you used the torque values that Honda puts' out you will probably be wrong most of the time. Food for thought. Now let's roast up some Big Red Piggies. Happy riding, Tony

  • Kritter

Posted May 28, 2006 - 03:41 PM

#4

I broke one of the axle studs in the front and a counter sprocker bolt...both the night before heading to mexico. I made a stud out of a long bolt and gooped the counter sprocket retainer on the side that with the brocken bolt. Lasted 500 miles so far, 400 of them baja 500 course miles.

  • Naru

Posted May 28, 2006 - 04:32 PM

#5

I own a SnapOn Tech1FR240 and a SnapOn Tech2FR100. Aside from the obvious problems with low quality torque wrenches, I was sick of bolts slipping and grabbing while I tightened them giving a similar sensation to the clicker feeling. The advantage of the Snap-On units is that they vibrate and make an audible beep when you reach torque so that you don't mistake false clicks. They also have a digital readout of the specified and current torque, as well as a conversion button for different units. I love both wrenches to death and would say they are the most important, and best, tools in my toolbox. Very, very well worth the money. They sell on ebay used for ~1/2 of retail ($300 and $325 respectively), but then you run into possible calibration problems.

  • creeky

Posted May 28, 2006 - 04:58 PM

#6

Not only does the torque wrench need to be properly calibrated, but the threads both inside the hole and on the bolt must be free of crud and in good condition in order to properly torque a fastener. If the the threads a burred or if there is rust or corrosion on them, the torque reading will be screwed up due to excess friction. Clean the threads, run a die over the bolt threads and a bottom tap into the threads in the hole if necessary to make sure it all works correctly.

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  • Mckay

Posted May 28, 2006 - 05:56 PM

#7

Hi, you can save yourself some money, all Snap On torque wrenches are made by a company named CDI. CDI is a subsidiary of Snap On now but the tools are exactly the same at almost half the cost...
Check Ebay, lots on ther usaually..

:applause:

  • Kritter

Posted May 28, 2006 - 06:35 PM

#8

Thanks for the advice about CDI...

As for the threads...I chase them all with my snap on thread chaser set...

  • qadsan

Posted May 30, 2006 - 06:50 PM

#9

Also think about getting a dial torque wrench as opposed to a click type. I have beam, click and dial type torque wrenches & screwdrivers from SnapOn, Mac, Matco, Craftsman, Sturtevant Richmond, CDI, Proto, etc, and I prefer the dial type over the others because they...

1) Handle accidental overload better than click type wrenches
2) Give you an exact real time reading as opposed to a no-go click
3) Allow you to measure rolling torque
4) Typically maintains its calibration longer because its only loaded when used
5) Typically provides more accuracy
6) Usually offers multiple scales on dial face for quick / easy real time reading

With the click type wrenches, always store them unloaded (no torque) to help maintain their accuracy. Always thoroughly clean off the threads before torquing your bolt. Changing the fastener to something other than OEM (different material or plating / surface treatment, etc) can change the torque spec. Always factor in any lube or anti-seize when torquing your fasteners.

Use a torque wrench that matches the application. In otherwords, don't use a 3/8 inch torque wrench with a scale up to 100lb/ft to torque a fastener that requires 5lb/ft of torque, especially with a click type wrench because the accuracy of the wrench is usually based on the readings from the center of the scale and the outer limits of the scale is usually significantly less accurate. This can sometimes mean the difference between getting the bolt properly torqued or stretching the fastener past the elastic zone and into the yield zone where it stays permanently stretched or breaks off. A good quality torque wrench will come with a calibration sheet that shows its accuracy throughout its scale so you know where things stand.

  • sorenlaf

Posted May 31, 2006 - 06:30 AM

#10

Not only does the torque wrench need to be properly calibrated, but the threads both inside the hole and on the bolt must be free of crud and in good condition in order to properly torque a fastener. If the the threads a burred or if there is rust or corrosion on them, the torque reading will be screwed up due to excess friction. Clean the threads, run a die over the bolt threads and a bottom tap into the threads in the hole if necessary to make sure it all works correctly.


Exactly.

If you can't run the fastener in with your fingers, you won't get the correct torque reading.

I think it was Carroll Smith that said: "I've seen more failures from overtorqued bolts than from undertorqued bolts." Just something to keep in mind.


--Soren

  • Eric Henion

Posted May 31, 2006 - 08:22 PM

#11

Ditto on all of the responses, remember you are only as good as your tools, and keep them clean and well maintained. For torque wrenches always have them calibrated and in the event of a drop have it re calibrated. It costs a few bucks but if it saves a day of riding its worth it.

  • KevinJamesKevin

Posted June 07, 2006 - 06:32 AM

#12

You need to "cycle" your clicker-type torque wrench before you actually use it to torque a fastener to the proper specifications.

When you pull your torque wrench out of your tool box to tighten a fastener to spec, don't just dial in the torque setting and start clicking away. You need to cycle it first. For example, say you are going to torque 4 head bolts to 20 lbs-ft. Before you start, dial in 20 lbs-ft on the wrench and "cycle" it on a bolt that is already tight (I use my rear axle nut). Just "click it" a few times to "warm up" the torque wrench. You can dial in a few different torque specs and click a few more times to make sure the wrench is "cycled." Then go ahead and torque those head bolts to spec. By doing this (cycling the wrench), you eliminate the initial innacuaracy that the clicker-type torque wrenches can sometimes have, particularly when using a torque wrench in the lower end of it's torque spectrum.





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