Shocked Newbie


17 replies to this topic
  • JayJayUK

Posted May 27, 2006 - 07:31 AM

#1

Hi Guys, went out for my first off road ride on my new WR450F '05 (having spent the 2 weeks since I puchased the bike fitting all mods and Dep end can). I have not been off road for quite a while (last off road experience Suzuki TS100 Trial) &%$#@! ME!! I must have been keping the revs down or something but getting a bit cocky (and thinking she must be run in by now 37miles) I opened her up!! now after the second broadside rear wheel slide (wet conditions) my monkey butt was cooled and lubricated from my rapidly filling pants WHHOOOOOHooo. Ten mins later I dismounted John wayne styleee and looked at my new toy with alot of new found respect and thinking to myself should I have sesibly purchased the 250? No B*LLO*KS Ill be scared and get used to the new found power in time.Next question can you get off road clothing with fitted air bags? Jay (Wet n Rainy UK)

  • simon@vic

Posted May 27, 2006 - 07:37 AM

#2

try the YZ cam and you will need adult diapers.........

you will get used to it fast and be looking for another 10hp soon!!!

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted May 28, 2006 - 11:30 AM

#3

...now after the second broadside rear wheel slide (wet conditions) my monkey butt was cooled and lubricated from my rapidly filling pants WHHOOOOOHooo. ...


funny ! :applause: :D :prof:

I can relate.

I have an 05 wr, which is my first real dirtbike in two decades. I have had several of those "oh shit" moments in which I found myself praying to the almightyy god. I have been looking for a ram mount for my bible, but havent found one yet.

I'd be riding along just fine, and then that moment would come up. You know the one, you fly around a turn and you are faced with a big rock or a big rut. You then roll right over it, but during the bouncing around, you inadvertently give it a little throttle, then the front wheel is up in the air and you can't see a damn thing. So you back off the throttle, the wheel comes down, but not straight, then you are doing a taste test of the dirt and rocks.

It has been a very painful year, literally. I extensively upgraded all of my safety gear, contemplated going to a 250, thought about taking up jetski's instead, etc...

I did two things to help me out. First, I reconnected the grey wire. It made a difference, not while just riding, but during those moments when I tense up, it keeps my engine rpms from running away on me.

Second thing I did was to put a trials tire on the rear. That thing hooks up so good, its almost like riding a street bike in the dirt. It is very confidence inspiring.

I am not necessarily an agressive rider, nor do I really jump or anything like that. I ride trails and single track, but I do ride at what I feel is a pretty good pace. This bike is perfect now. I still have all of my low end grunt, I am just missing that high end power that gets me into trouble anyway.

Amazingly, I ride with more confidence now and have no problem keeping up on the trails and hill climbs. The next thing I do will be the suspension.

Over time, I can see myself disconnecting the grey wire permanently and going back to knobbies. But by then, I will be a much better rider.

Good luck finding those air bags!

  • mtrablue

Posted May 28, 2006 - 12:20 PM

#4

you might think about undoing some of your mods. like the previous post said, reconnect the grey wire. you might want to put the stock exhaust back on. you'll have to drop your main jet a size but it will help tame the beast. you might have liked it box stock. it's pretty easy to get ourselves all wound up about making these bikes faster. we're all guilty of it. there is a difference between making them run right (jetting is most important) and making them fast (exhaust can and YZ cam). for just trail riding, they're not half bad stock.

  • dl19

Posted May 28, 2006 - 05:27 PM

#5

No S&*# I freaking messed my knee up the first major ride due to launching off a hill climb. I had to twist it pretty hard on my XR400 if the climb had a lip at the top to hop over instead of wheelie back down the hill. Did the the same thing with my 05, and it launched up and over like a 3rd gear kicker. Tore some ligaments and bruised both sides of the knee joint. Less then a month later (still not healed yet but could not stand it) too much power coming out of a corner in 3rd, wheelied out from under me, wadded it up, knocked my a$# out for 50 minutes, and broke my shoulder blade in half. Now I can't ride at all, and the bike has less then 400 miles on it. It is just too easy and too much fun to use the power, but I will slow down for a summer to get a little used to it. Love the power but it is hugely different then a 30hp bike.

  • Dodjy

Posted May 28, 2006 - 07:05 PM

#6

Hey Guys, the WR power isn't agressive. It's linear and doesn't hit that hard. It just builds strongly. I think it would be a shame to detune it. The biggest thing about coming off a lesser capable bike is trusting your WR. When you come across a big rut, log, puddle, corner or what ever at speed, the best thing you can do is grit your teeth, hold on with your legs, look way ahead, power on if you can, and trust your WR will do the right thing. It is amazing what your bike can do in an emergency situation. The worst thing you can do is tense up, fix your eyes on the object (aka magnet), panic and back off. The mistake was made way back when you let yourself get to that speed. If you can get your front wheel over it you are 99% there. If you find yourself accelerating when you shouldn't check your throttle grip hasn't turned, causing your thumb to push the throttle open when you are braking or hitting large bumps.
Detuning your bike will make it more dangerous. You will not be able to lob the front wheel up as fast or easy to clear obsticles. You will need to ride it harder to achieve the same result (eg fan the clutch etc), and it won't be running as efficiently. You will always have those sphincter puckering moments no matter what bike or power you've got, just gotta take it easier with the right hand. Try rolling the throttle on instead of opening it up like a switch, this will teach you to feel the connection between the right grip and the power and you will also learn to feel where the bike is under you. Like when the front wheel starts to lift up instead of when it is 4 foot from the ground and when the rear wheel starts to slide instead of when it is about to overtake you. You will eventually feel as though the bike is part of you and ride it using your subconsious reactions, leaving your mind to observe the track way up ahead and plan the best route. If you think a 250 will make it better you better ride one first. The power will be more twitchy, you will need to ride it more aggressively to get up the same hills and you will probably be going just as fast or faster in the tight stuff. Sure they are lighter and can be jumped or flung around more easily but to do that you need to be a good rider. The bigger bike is much more suited to those who want to chug around and open her up down the straights every now and again. Just start from the beginning again, go slower, be patient and respect its power. In no time you will be wanting more power.

  • TWILES

Posted May 28, 2006 - 07:42 PM

#7

I FULLY agree with you. I spent my life from 15 - 21 learning to ride 2-stroke quads starting with a built 500 quadracer I got from a friend to my 265R Honda ( 50hp ) to my last one which was a Banshee( my picture ) that I nearly cried over when I sold it and saw it leaving in another guys truck. My WR is my first dirtbike. I've learned to ride it in the last few months. I will have had it a year in July. I was scared of it until spring and I've about got it down. I did what you are telling these guys which was the same thing I did when I got the QuadRacer. I had a Warrior and 300EX before and could ride them good but the 60 HP 2-stroke was a completely different way of riding and mindset. I put those principals toward the other 2 quads I raced and now toward the WR. It is the best route to go when learing a new bike. Something I tell my wife is that I can't TEACH you anything but I can teach you to learn on your own. Saying the bike will feel like it is part of you sounds stupid to most people. I told a kid that 5 years ago who bought his Banshee the same time I did. He looked at me like I was stupid and laughed at me in front of 20 people. I put a lap on him half way through the race. He still thinks he is hot shit to this day. Everyone who knows him and those who don't laugh at him to this day. He now has a $25,000 CRF/laeger quad and he races B. I don't know what its like in Austrailia but here its a joke. Not to sound like an ******* but a 450 ( in my opinion ) is really aimed at younger guys in faily good shape with recent expirience with newer bikes. I'm 24 and my dad died 2 years ago of cancer and he would be 48 June 6th. I got my Banshee in July 30 of '99. He jumped on it before I even got out of the house. Dad could ride but I don't think I needed the Banshee. For a high HP anything you need to be able to flow and stay loose in bad situations. Again, I don't want to sound like a dick but mabey instead of detuning the bikes, you should tune up yourselves. This motor stock and opened up is the easiest I have ever been on to have the HP it has. I LOVE IT. From my expirience, knowing nothing is better then thinking you know everything when it comes you learing a new rig. I wish I had someone to tell me that when I got the TRX450R. I MIGHT have been impressed.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted May 28, 2006 - 11:48 PM

#8

Not to sound like an ******* but a 450 ( in my opinion ) is really aimed at younger guys in faily good shape ...


Uhmmm.... You do sound like a ******* ! I think we will have to frame your quote. What is your definition of younger? Is the 250 aimed at old guys in bad shape with low confidence?

Hey Guys, the WR power isn't agressive. It's linear and doesn't hit that hard. It just builds strongly. I think it would be a shame to detune it.


It would be a shame, but I wouldn't suggest that detuning the bike is the answer to rider errors the same as i wouldn't suggest that a faster bike is a more capable one.

I think that are many good lessons to be learned while going slower. That power can get you into trouble if you aren't ready for it. I was just sharing how I became more comfortable with my WR after some nasty falls. Going slower and riding easier trails is the proper prescription for someone who is still learning.

I alternate between connecting and disreconnecting my grey wire. I don't notice much difference while riding the single track trails at a moderate pace, which I primary do.

  • MotoGoalie

Posted May 29, 2006 - 08:16 AM

#9

You guys are right. The fact of the matter is, the WR, opened up is aimed at a rider that has good skills.

Noobs should not be buying this bike. I've seen firsthand that noobs can kill thier confidence on this particular bike and give the sport up altogether. You don't do anyone any favors by suggesting this bike for beginners.

It makes a hellacious amount of power, and more importantly, it handles extremely quick (unlike an XR) and will get a noob on thier head before they can say, OH SHIZZNET.

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  • TWILES

Posted May 29, 2006 - 10:05 AM

#10

I had to get mine moving in 3rd on trails to get used to it. At slow speeds it was just too heavy. The faster you go the better the bike feels( like all yamaha's ). I AM a " noob " and I got used to mine fairly easily. These bikes wouldn't be so similar to the YZ if they weren't supposed to be ridden that way. I'm sorry my coment on age is mean but its kind of true. The older guys who ride the YZ's are in good shape and can RIDE. I don't understant why the WR is supposed to be different. Your tacking on nearly 30lbs with the same suspension and less stock HP. When you buy the bike it is listed as " competition " . I didn't say that you guys in your 40's and 50's shouldn't have it. I just suggested that you should take the time to learn like the guy before me did. When it comes to physical ability, the whole point is riding motorcycles is that you have to move around. I love mine. I had $2000 in suspension on my Banshee and 250R and the WR is better then both of them stock. With ample speed, landing from 6 - 7 feet is nothing and the motor could use a little more bottom-mid but other than that its great. If a guy is really afraid on the bike, get it moving and play with it. Mine handles and performs better the faster its moving and the motor is 10 times easier to manage when uncorked and reved.

  • MTRider

Posted May 29, 2006 - 10:29 AM

#11

As another data point, I am a 42, 230lb noob who has NEVER ridden a motorcycle before. The only reason I got an 06 WR450 was due to recommendations from friends and dealers. The first time out I was terrified. After 2-3 times more I am more comfortable. All mods done finally and it really rocks. I haven't found the bike to snap uncontrollably or throw me around. As stated earlier the biggest problem is its lack of balance and weight. I dropped the bike this weekend and sprained my wrist bad enough to stop me from riding for a week or so. I don't like the slow speed handling but once it gets moving it is a joy. I quickly learned that acceleration is my friend avoiding several potential wrecks (logs, ruts, sand etc). Other than the slow speed characteristics I feel that it is a fine beginners bike. I would guess an old trail bike (200, 250) would pack me around fine and might even be fun.

What would be your suggestion for an old, out of shape beginner? If possible suggest '06 model bikes.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted May 29, 2006 - 01:21 PM

#12

There's nothing wrong with the bike that you have. You could actually look at it as if it were two bikes.

While corked, it is a mild mannered bike. When uncorked, its a hi performance race bike.

  • Darth Wader

Posted May 29, 2006 - 05:13 PM

#13

In the grandest scheme...the ultimate control is the right hand. No matter what kind of bike you are on if you ride outside your ability you will get in trouble.

IMHO the WR450 is probably one the most well mannered full bore race bikes you can get. The thing is a beast (uncorked) IF you roll into it. The faster you ride it the more it begs for more. Slow and steady it rolls right along too, rider is the biggest factor. I wouldn't say this isn't a good bike to start on, I think it is a great bike to start on...you just have to exercise self control and stay within your ability.

It'll take you to fastville but, you gotta' take your time building up to it.

Just my .02, for what it is worth.

  • adgruben

Posted May 29, 2006 - 07:01 PM

#14

I have never owned a dirt bike before my 06 wr450, but I love it I installed an ais delete and a baja design dual sport kit. I think that I will leave it at that for awhile, but overall I wouldn't want to sacrifice any of this bikes power. I was a little disappointed with the way the bike started and idled before installing the ais delete kit. That was the main reason for installing it but I found the extra little punch to be an added bonus. Unfortunatly I broke my foot in 4 places the second day I owned the bike so I can now only sneak quick little rides in when the wifes not around. If only those damn riding boots would have come sooner! :applause:

  • bluebike1999

Posted May 29, 2006 - 08:40 PM

#15

as far as being a newb goes, i always recommend that they do an 'apprenticeship' on a 250 and graduate to 400 426 450.
these things are animals and in a previous thread i read that some had been scared off the sport totally and i'm not surprised.

testosterone plays a part in bike mods, as in standard trim, i believe my old 400 was more user freindly in tight trails and general riding , than after uncorking. the wr is designed to grip and not spin like a yz and the power required to do that is adequate in stock form.

make mine spin thanks.....
mines yz timed, opened airbox, exhuast mod and thats all.

there are guys who jump straight onto a 400 and are right from the start( ususally off farms or rural based for some reason) others will never handle one.
I've been riding wifes ttr 230 a fair bit around my place lately and on the weekend i jumped back on the 400..........wicked wicked wicked, wicked power, wicked suspension
yes i love mine too.

  • odonnks

Posted May 30, 2006 - 04:33 AM

#16

As another data point, I am a 42, 230lb noob who has NEVER ridden a motorcycle before. The only reason I got an 06 WR450 was due to recommendations from friends and dealers. The first time out I was terrified. After 2-3 times more I am more comfortable. All mods done finally and it really rocks. I haven't found the bike to snap uncontrollably or throw me around. As stated earlier the biggest problem is its lack of balance and weight. I dropped the bike this weekend and sprained my wrist bad enough to stop me from riding for a week or so. I don't like the slow speed handling but once it gets moving it is a joy. I quickly learned that acceleration is my friend avoiding several potential wrecks (logs, ruts, sand etc). Other than the slow speed characteristics I feel that it is a fine beginners bike. I would guess an old trail bike (200, 250) would pack me around fine and might even be fun.

What would be your suggestion for an old, out of shape beginner? If possible suggest '06 model bikes.



Like mtn biking, Skiing, snowboarding and many other sports that require movement around and over obstacles Big MO-entum is your friend.

In all of these you actually need to go faster than your initial comfort level to pull off technical moves.

  • byggd

Posted May 30, 2006 - 07:36 AM

#17

In the grandest scheme...the ultimate control is the right hand. No matter what kind of bike you are on if you ride outside your ability you will get in trouble.

IMHO the WR450 is probably one the most well mannered full bore race bikes you can get. The thing is a beast (uncorked) IF you roll into it. The faster you ride it the more it begs for more. Slow and steady it rolls right along too, rider is the biggest factor. I wouldn't say this isn't a good bike to start on, I think it is a great bike to start on...you just have to exercise self control and stay within your ability.

It'll take you to fastville but, you gotta' take your time building up to it.

Just my .02, for what it is worth.

I completely agree. I know the 426 isn't quite the beast the 450 is but it does have one hell on a mid-range hit. As I was learning to ride (again) I had to learn to use some self control with my right hand and short shifted a lot until I got used to the power hit. Some say the bike doesn't handle well going slow, all I can say is get up off of the seat and learn to use your body weight as a counter-weight. I'm not saying that speed isn't your friend but sometimes it's not possible (or smart) to use the power. I started out riding the bike in an area where you spend most of your time in 2nd, where balance is your biggest friend and now I like the bike a all speeds. :applause:

  • MotoGoalie

Posted May 30, 2006 - 07:51 AM

#18

That is what made the XR series so good, the 250 and especially the 400, they were good noob bikes, great trail bikes, comfortable and wouldn't get you into the trouble real fast.

The WR450 is very closely related to the YZ series and it handles like a cousin to an MX bike. It's not the power I'm talking about. Its the quick handling that gets guys into trouble.

Look at my sig, I love that quick handling. But, I've been riding and racing for 25 years.

My FIL started riding at 50 y/o and has an XR 250. A WR anything would have killed him, as he can barely handle the XR....which doesn't speak very well for his skills but he's a noob. That's ok.

The WR is not for everyone. That is an empirical truth.




 
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