Which size I.M.S. tank 3.2/4.0?


10 replies to this topic
  • beamer

Posted May 22, 2006 - 06:07 PM

#1

I am planning on racing the Baja 1000 in 08 and am wondering which tank to go with on my BRP. Is the 3.2 not enough capacity? Is the 4 too bulky? Any input would be greatly appreciated. Oh ya is the dry-break worth getting?

  • qadsan

Posted May 22, 2006 - 06:25 PM

#2

Team Honda has used the IMS 3.2 on their 650R's and it's common among other racers. Your fuel range with this tank is ~60 race miles. The IMS 3.2 is actually skinnier than the stock tank. More fuel doesn't always hurt and you don't have to fill it up all the way, but I do like the smaller size of the 3.2 compared to the other tanks I've owned, including the Clarke 4.3.

If you're going to be racing competitively, then YES, the dry brake setup is a MUST. It literally takes just a couple seconds to completely fill your tank with fuel with the dry brake as opposed to using other types of fuel cannisters which take much longer.

  • beamer

Posted May 22, 2006 - 06:31 PM

#3

That is kind of what I figured about the tanks. If I hire a pit service will they have dry break fillers at each pit do you Know?

  • qadsan

Posted May 22, 2006 - 06:52 PM

#4

Some do and some don't, so it's best to contact the pit service you plan to use and make certain they'll have dry brake dump cans with probes if you're planning to go the dry brake route. Barnums Pro Pits has supplied dry brake dump cans with probes at some of the previous races, but check with your pit service to make certain they'll meet your needs.

Somewhere I've got a video of a guy coming into pit for a race (harescramble as a recall) and he's being gassed with a normal can while other racers that came in behind him are gassed and gone with their dry brake setups. As I recall, you can see his frustration as several riders come and go from behind him while he's simply getting his tank filled.

  • qadsan

Posted May 22, 2006 - 07:56 PM

#5

Figure a ~40+ second advantage at each pit with a dry brake vs being filled with a simple jug. While some jugs fill faster than others, the dry brake type system puts them all to shame when it comes to speed. Figure your pits every 50 miles and ~18 pits total X a ~40+ second advantage at each pit, so you're getting a ~12+ minute advantage over the guys with regular gas cans. You need to figure if 12+ minutes is worth the price of the dry brake setup because they don't come cheap.

The IMS dry brake tanks run $225 and the receivers needed for these tanks cost $220. If you plan to buy your own dump can / probe & stand setup, then you're looking at $450+ more on top of this.

Speaking of dry brakes, you just reminded me of something. I might be selling some of my used dry brake receivers (if I can find them) and I'll be asking $125 + shipping or local pickup. This is just the receiver and possibly the allen screws if I can find them. I also have some used IMS 3.2 dry brake tanks (natural / clear) somewhere in storage that I may sell if I can find them and I'll be asking $130 each + shipping or local pickup. I've also got one more 100% factory sealed new Edelbrock pumper carb kit for the 650R and I'm asking $369.99 cash + shipping or local pickup for it. Also have a brand new pair of $96 IMS Pro Peg that are still in their factory unopened shrink wrap and I'm asking $70 for them. I know I also have some extra petcocks, but I haven't yet been able to find the petcocks yet. Send me a PM if interested in anything above.

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  • Blownaway

Posted May 22, 2006 - 08:40 PM

#6

Can you fuel a dry brake tank at a gas pump? sorry if I am :ride:

  • qadsan

Posted May 22, 2006 - 08:58 PM

#7

Can you fuel a dry brake tank at a gas pump? sorry if I am :ride:


No,. At least not very easily and I wouldn't recommend trying it at a gas station.

If you ever plan to race and are buying an aftermarket fuel tank, the best option is to get a dry brake fuel tank and buy the bolt in trail cap insert. This converts the dry brake setup to a screw cap so you can fill up at any gas station or from a normal fuel jug, etc. When race time comes, you simply unbolt the trail cap and bolt in your dry brake insert and you're ready to rock. It's a slick setup and something I always do with my bikes, but my race days are now definitely over I'm selling off some of my new & used spare goodies.

Here's a picture of a dry brake insert...
Posted Image


Here's a picture of the trail cap that bolts in place of the dry brake...
Posted Image


Here's a picture of the dump can & probe and the stand that's used with the dry brake setup...
Posted Image
Posted Image

  • Kritter

Posted May 23, 2006 - 06:18 AM

#8

Can you fuel a dry brake tank at a gas pump? sorry if I am :ride:


with 2 people you can...by yourself its kind of hard. You need one person to hold down the receiver cap and one person to pump.

I would say a dry break is worth about 2 minutes. My can dumps 3 gallons in about 5-7 seconds...my regular jug takes about 2 minutes.

The only disadvantage ive seen yet with the drybreak is if your pit man doesnt pop the probe out fast enough and it sticks...your balls are gonna be burning from gas. The vent hose seems to piss out a lot more gas too(even with the trick Acerbis baffle installed in the line) since it doesnt have the large rubber baffle like a regular cap.

70 miles and I was running on fumes with the smaller tank in mexico this last weekend but the bigger tanks I saw down there looked rediculous.

  • Kritter

Posted May 23, 2006 - 06:22 AM

#9

That is kind of what I figured about the tanks. If I hire a pit service will they have dry break fillers at each pit do you Know?


I think baja pits charges 100 per dump can rental fee...not sure what honda charges but im sure its more plus its a lot more for honda pits anyhow.

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted May 23, 2006 - 09:01 AM

#10

We do a lot of desert riding here in Washington which probably isn't anything like Baja. If the ride is 55 miles or less I like the stock tank better than any other. If the ride is 125 miles and up I prefer the IMS 4.6. On a recent 117 mile ride we ran into winds which were blowing at speeds up to 50 mph by the end of the day. I hit reserve at 110 miles. Fuel mileage falls to pieces when your fighting a wind. My point is simply this: there are many factors that effect your range on any given bike. Sometimes unexpected things can leave you high and dry when it comes to fuel. :ride:

  • motochris

Posted May 23, 2006 - 12:58 PM

#11

Also have a brand new pair of $96 IMS Pro Peg that are still in their factory unopened shrink wrap and I'm asking $70 for them.



I'll take those IMS Propegs for $70 shipped.





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