Chain Wax Vs. WD-40


15 replies to this topic
  • azmanxman

Posted May 03, 2006 - 08:32 AM

#1

What's your opinion on keeping your O-ring/X-ring chain clean?

I ride 100% desert (Tucson) and hear that Chain Wax only attracts dirt and sand. But I've also heard that WD-40 is bad for O-rings.

Also, what do you clean your chain with? Simple Green?

What have you found that works?

  • TimBrp

Posted May 03, 2006 - 08:43 AM

#2

The Moose chain scrubber setup works great. Usually I'll wash the bike down and get out my "grunge brush" w/ a can of WD-40 and clean the chain up. I don't put lube as IMO it just attracts dirt. You shouldn't need to grease an "ORING/XRING" chain. That's why it has orings packed with grease in the first place. I now have 1 1/2 seasons on my 650r's chain using WD-40 when before I would blow through one a year easy using chain lube.

  • qadsan

Posted May 03, 2006 - 08:53 AM

#3

Simple green works fine for cleaning. WD40 also cleans well, but not all solvents are safe for all types of o-rings. I've never had a problem using WD40 on o-ring chains and some chain manufacturers such as RK have recommended WD40 to their customers.

Not all chain manufacturers use the same quality of o-rings, so what's safe on one mfgr's o-rings may not be safe on another if you're using a harsh solvent. Also, some solvents are thin enough to sometimes penetrate into some of the pin bushing areas and this can lead to premature failure in some of the links. After the chain is clean, then use a dry film chain lube that provides barrier protection. Oils, greases and waxes provide very little in the way of barrier protection unless they replentished and they attract abrasive particulate, which is not good for the long term health of your chain & sprockets. The dry film chain lube I use is Schaeffer's #227 Micron Moly Roller Chain Lube. It's hard to find, which is why I keep a couple cases at home for our bikes and for our friends, but it's great stuff, lasts a long time and isn't too expensive. Here's the technical data sheet on it.

http://www.schaeffer...datapdf/227.pdf

  • ghoti

Posted May 03, 2006 - 08:54 AM

#4

The Moose chain scrubber setup works great. Usually I'll wash the bike down and get out my "grunge brush" w/ a can of WD-40 and clean the chain up. I don't put lube as IMO it just attracts dirt. You shouldn't need to grease an "ORING/XRING" chain. That's why it has orings packed with grease in the first place. I now have 1 1/2 seasons on my 650r's chain using WD-40 when before I would blow through one a year easy using chain lube.

Basically what I do. I got 15,000 street miles from my stock DiD. Much easier to keep everything clean too.

  • goblin127

Posted May 03, 2006 - 09:13 AM

#5

I've been finding after all these years WD40 does the best job for cleaning and lube if I use it regularly.

  • cleonard

Posted May 03, 2006 - 09:31 AM

#6

I'm in Southern California and ride is somewhat the same kind of riding conditions as you do. A little more mud in the winter I imagine. I've been running the Maxima chain wax. I never clean the chain. I think that cleaning the crud with solvent is bad. I ride pretty much every weekend and my last chain and sprocket set lasted about 4 years. I replaced them because the sprockets were starting to get that shark toothed look. I took a close look at the chain and it was really still in pretty good shape.

I think the keys for long chain life are:

Keep the pressure washer away from the chain
Don't use solvents on the chain
Use something to keep it from rusting

  • desert4seat

Posted May 03, 2006 - 09:56 AM

#7

I'm in Southern California and ride is somewhat the same kind of riding conditions as you do. A little more mud in the winter I imagine. I've been running the Maxima chain wax. I never clean the chain. I think that cleaning the crud with solvent is bad. I ride pretty much every weekend and my last chain and sprocket set lasted about 4 years. I replaced them because the sprockets were starting to get that shark toothed look. I took a close look at the chain and it was really still in pretty good shape.

I think the keys for long chain life are:

Keep the pressure washer away from the chain
Don't use solvents on the chain
Use something to keep it from rusting


thats exactly what i do too...exactly.

  • XRidiculous

Posted May 03, 2006 - 05:14 PM

#8

This thread died on another list, for another bike, 5 years ago, and now its back-this has to be the most talked about ever.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • scapegoat

Posted May 03, 2006 - 07:02 PM

#9

My .02$ is that WD40 and the like is a excellent solvent/ light lube. What better thing to remove road tar etc. It also disolves the O ring factory lube. Ive been using chain wax for 15 years and over 75K combined miles. It dosent attract dirt and sand anything like typical gooy sticky chain lubes. Try wax go blast up a sandwash then apply some crystal clear synthetic lube and do the same. the wheel etc will be splattered with flung lube and the chain and sprockets will be covered with dirt and sand.
Fire away.

  • Max Power

Posted May 03, 2006 - 07:09 PM

#10

WD-40 sure does smell good.

  • ShadyatBest

Posted May 03, 2006 - 07:19 PM

#11

What does WD-40 stand for?
WD-40 literally stands for Water Displacement, 40th attempt. That's the name straight out of the lab book used by the chemist who developed WD-40 back in 1953. The chemist, Norm Larsen, was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion—a task which is done by displacing water. Norm's persistence paid off when he perfected the formula on his 40th try. Please see Our History for more information.



What does WD-40 contain?
While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

What is the shelf life of WD-40?
Indefinite. While some products may have an expiration date, WD-40 lasts so long that a "use by" date isn't necessary.

How long does WD-40 last after application?
While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of WD-40 for maximum protection.

I've heard that people use WD-40 as a cleaner/remover. What can it be used on?
WD-40 removes sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment, and vehicles. Use it to remove splattered bugs from the front of cars. WD-40 will even help remove gum from carpet. Just spray, wait, and wipe with a clean cloth.


How is WD-40 different from 3-IN-ONE?
WD-40 is the ultimate multi-purpose problem solver. WD-40 cleans/degreases, penetrates to loosen up stuck parts, prevents corrosion and is a light lubricant. 3-IN-ONE, with it's special drip spout, enables you to lubricate without any overspray or splatter. 3-IN-ONE is ideal to use on tools, rollers, hinges, in-line skates, wheels...nearly everything that moves.



What does WD-40 do?
WD-40 fulfills five basic functions:

CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape and excess bonding material.
DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and tenaciously held to all moving parts.
PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.
What surfaces or materials are OK to use WD-40 on?
WD-40 can be used on just about everything. It is safe for metal, rubber, wood and plastic. WD-40 can be applied to painted metal surfaces without harming the paint. Polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic are among the few surfaces on which to avoid using a petroleum-based product like WD-40.


What about using WD-40 on my sports equipment?
WD-40 is safe and effective to use on all types of sporting goods. Use WD-40 on your bike to clean, degrease and lubricate your chain, derailleur, gears, cogs, and moving parts. It will help remove stickers. Use WD-40 to clean and protect your gun. It will prevent corrosion and it won't damage bluing. Spray it on dirt bikes to protect parts and prevent mud from sticking. Use it on watercraft to protect metal surfaces from corrosion and to drive out moisture. WD-40 is also great for cleaning golf clubs and preventing rust on hockey skate blades.

What is the propellant in WD-40?
A propellant is the stuff that helps pump WD-40 out of the can. The propellant used in WD-40 is carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 is an inert gas which helps empty the can. Plus, the addition of CO2 reduced the number of VOCs, which helps preserve the environment. Be sure to point the spray nozzle toward the dot on the top of the can to ensure that the can fully empties.

How do I keep the red straws from getting lost?
In response to the anguished cries of "I lost my WD-40 straw," we are pleased to present the NotchCap. Designed to securely hold the straw in place when not in use, the NotchCap will eliminate once and for all the heartbreak of losing straws. Simply snap the straw into the recessed slot on the top of the new cap and it will stay there until removed for use. It's one small step to keep WD-40 users smiling. If you prefer, store the straw inside the lip of the can or tape back onto the side of the can. Or, just grab yourself a rubberband. This works great as well. To attach the straw to the nozzle: pull nozzle off first then insert straw and place nozzle back on stem on top of can.

Do professionals use WD-40?
Yes. Mechanics, plumbers, farmers, construction and maintenance workers make a living with their tools. And they only use tools they can trust. Perhaps that's why WD-40 is the multi-purpose lubricant of choice by professionals around the world.


Where can I buy WD-40?
In many countries, WD-40 is available almost everywhere. WD-40 can be found in automotive, convenience, discount, drug, grocery, hardware, and home center stores. It's also available from leading distributors all over the world. If your store or distributor doesn't sell WD-40, please ask them to add it.

Does WD-40 offer sponsorship opportunities?
WD-40 Company has focused its resources on supporting athletes through Giant BMX and is no longer able to offer individual sponsorships. We wish to thank all those who have been sponsored by WD-40 Company in the past and wish you good luck in your future racing career.

  • Max Power

Posted May 03, 2006 - 07:35 PM

#12

What does WD-40 stand for?
WD-40 literally stands for Water Displacement, 40th attempt. That's the name straight out of the lab book used by the chemist who developed WD-40 back in 1953. The chemist, Norm Larsen, was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion—a task which is done by displacing water. Norm's persistence paid off when he perfected the formula on his 40th try. Please see Our History for more information.



What does WD-40 contain?
While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

What is the shelf life of WD-40?


God Bless america and WD-40. :crazy:
Indefinite. While some products may have an expiration date, WD-40 lasts so long that a "use by" date isn't necessary.

How long does WD-40 last after application?
While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of WD-40 for maximum protection.

I've heard that people use WD-40 as a cleaner/remover. What can it be used on?
WD-40 removes sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment, and vehicles. Use it to remove splattered bugs from the front of cars. WD-40 will even help remove gum from carpet. Just spray, wait, and wipe with a clean cloth.


How is WD-40 different from 3-IN-ONE?
WD-40 is the ultimate multi-purpose problem solver. WD-40 cleans/degreases, penetrates to loosen up stuck parts, prevents corrosion and is a light lubricant. 3-IN-ONE, with it's special drip spout, enables you to lubricate without any overspray or splatter. 3-IN-ONE is ideal to use on tools, rollers, hinges, in-line skates, wheels...nearly everything that moves.



What does WD-40 do?
WD-40 fulfills five basic functions:

CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape and excess bonding material.
DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and tenaciously held to all moving parts.
PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.
What surfaces or materials are OK to use WD-40 on?
WD-40 can be used on just about everything. It is safe for metal, rubber, wood and plastic. WD-40 can be applied to painted metal surfaces without harming the paint. Polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic are among the few surfaces on which to avoid using a petroleum-based product like WD-40.


What about using WD-40 on my sports equipment?
WD-40 is safe and effective to use on all types of sporting goods. Use WD-40 on your bike to clean, degrease and lubricate your chain, derailleur, gears, cogs, and moving parts. It will help remove stickers. Use WD-40 to clean and protect your gun. It will prevent corrosion and it won't damage bluing. Spray it on dirt bikes to protect parts and prevent mud from sticking. Use it on watercraft to protect metal surfaces from corrosion and to drive out moisture. WD-40 is also great for cleaning golf clubs and preventing rust on hockey skate blades.

What is the propellant in WD-40?
A propellant is the stuff that helps pump WD-40 out of the can. The propellant used in WD-40 is carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 is an inert gas which helps empty the can. Plus, the addition of CO2 reduced the number of VOCs, which helps preserve the environment. Be sure to point the spray nozzle toward the dot on the top of the can to ensure that the can fully empties.

How do I keep the red straws from getting lost?
In response to the anguished cries of "I lost my WD-40 straw," we are pleased to present the NotchCap. Designed to securely hold the straw in place when not in use, the NotchCap will eliminate once and for all the heartbreak of losing straws. Simply snap the straw into the recessed slot on the top of the new cap and it will stay there until removed for use. It's one small step to keep WD-40 users smiling. If you prefer, store the straw inside the lip of the can or tape back onto the side of the can. Or, just grab yourself a rubberband. This works great as well. To attach the straw to the nozzle: pull nozzle off first then insert straw and place nozzle back on stem on top of can.

Do professionals use WD-40?
Yes. Mechanics, plumbers, farmers, construction and maintenance workers make a living with their tools. And they only use tools they can trust. Perhaps that's why WD-40 is the multi-purpose lubricant of choice by professionals around the world.


Where can I buy WD-40?
In many countries, WD-40 is available almost everywhere. WD-40 can be found in automotive, convenience, discount, drug, grocery, hardware, and home center stores. It's also available from leading distributors all over the world. If your store or distributor doesn't sell WD-40, please ask them to add it.

Does WD-40 offer sponsorship opportunities?
WD-40 Company has focused its resources on supporting athletes through Giant BMX and is no longer able to offer individual sponsorships. We wish to thank all those who have been sponsored by WD-40 Company in the past and wish you good luck in your future racing career.




God bless WD-40 and america.

  • weskc35k

Posted May 04, 2006 - 03:58 PM

#13

Wow,you want fries with that?

  • XRidiculous

Posted May 04, 2006 - 04:17 PM

#14

Do you see what I mean? WD-40 should have its own shrine the way people write about it.

It cleans off my Billet Rims easier than Chain Lube-THERE!

  • LotsOfBikes

Posted May 04, 2006 - 09:01 PM

#15

As long as the lubrication that you are using enables your o-ring chain to last an entire year of desert racing, on a CR500R with never having to adjust the chain back, you are doing something right.

That's right. I never have to adjust my chains on any of my bikes until the O-rings rot and start to vanish. I then replace the chain.

  • weskc35k

Posted May 04, 2006 - 09:07 PM

#16

So Sean enlighten us,i know your still here.





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