Rear wheel hop


11 replies to this topic
  • odonnks

Posted April 18, 2006 - 04:57 PM

#1

When going hard on a flat surface and then on teh brakes into a turn I get severe rear wheel hop. The surface is slightly wash boarded.
Does anyone know what adjustment to change to attempt to reduce it. Or a suggested riding technique that might help.

I've train ridden all my life but never had a bike the performs like this and begs to be ridden hard.

Thanks

  • Matty05

Posted April 18, 2006 - 05:01 PM

#2

When going hard on a flat surface and then on teh brakes into a turn I get severe rear wheel hop. The surface is slightly wash boarded.
Does anyone know what adjustment to change to attempt to reduce it. Or a suggested riding technique that might help.

I've train ridden all my life but never had a bike the performs like this and begs to be ridden hard.

Thanks

Have you tried backing off the rebound a bit?

You should invest in some suspension tuning. Well worth the $$$.

  • bg10459

Posted April 18, 2006 - 06:37 PM

#3

Have you tried backing off the rebound a bit?

I'm not really sure if this is what Matty means, but I think you should try increasing your rebound damping (slow the rebound). Turn your clicker in (clockwise) 2 clicks and re-test.

  • odonnks

Posted April 19, 2006 - 01:57 AM

#4

I'll try the rebound dampening tonight.
Re suspension tuning, I'm in the process of looking for someone in my area.

Thanks

  • J_DOGG

Posted April 19, 2006 - 08:23 AM

#5

Compression might be set too high also.....

I'd go slower through that section a few times to see if you can tell if the bike is pushing up or the bump is doing the pushing up. If it feels like the bike is pushing you out the front I'd check rebound and if it feels like the bump is making the bike hit you in the a$$ I'd check the compression.

  • J_DOGG

Posted April 19, 2006 - 08:25 AM

#6

Keep in mind If you go too soft on compression the bike will start to swap back and forth....should be an entierly different feeling though.

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  • GCannon

Posted April 19, 2006 - 08:35 AM

#7

You might want to check your rear brake system are the pad and rotor contacting smoothly are the pads shot are the brake pins rusted are the caliper mounting loose rear brake chatter may be causing a wheel hop don't forget to give your suspension linkage some love when you are getting your shock serviced.

  • 5hauler

Posted April 19, 2006 - 09:05 AM

#8

With out sounding stupid,which I do easiely. My 450 will do that but it due to engine braking and the brakes. Are you droping the throttle when this happens. I raced 2 stroke all my life and they dont have the engine braking my wr has. On my wr if I hit a corner fast and drop the throttle she will hop to the point that I cant stear as the back is sliding. blip throttle or pull clutch and all is well again, been told all the big 4 strokes have this problem.
Jay

  • WGP

Posted April 19, 2006 - 09:32 AM

#9

I fixed this problem yesturday, going through deep whoops the back end wanted to buck me off.

A couple clicks in (clockwise) on adjuster, bottom of shock by the swingarm.

  • Captain Bob

Posted April 19, 2006 - 11:27 AM

#10

With out sounding stupid,which I do easiely. My 450 will do that but it due to engine braking and the brakes. Are you droping the throttle when this happens. I raced 2 stroke all my life and they dont have the engine braking my wr has. On my wr if I hit a corner fast and drop the throttle she will hop to the point that I cant stear as the back is sliding. blip throttle or pull clutch and all is well again, been told all the big 4 strokes have this problem.
Jay


This is only a problem if your suspension is not set right. The problem sounds like a compression problem to me. If you are not familiar with the suspension adjustments, contact a suspension company like race-tech or perhaps, there is one local to you. Find out the starting point for the adjustments based upon the type of terrain you ride, your style (aggressive/non-aggresive), and your weight. Suspension setting is more important then horsepower. My WR sucked until I got the suspension dialed in. I know getting the correct springs and re-valving (front and rear) sound expensive but that is the best upgrade you can do to your bike. It makes that much diffference! The company that does the work will most likely give you a chart to use to set the suspension when riding different types of terrain. This is has been extremely helpful to me.

Good luck!

Bob

  • dl19

Posted April 19, 2006 - 02:45 PM

#11

It is caused by both too much compression (need softer) and too much rebound (need slower). Start with one and see if it works. I will take a little trial and error. If you are doing a lot of jumping I would start with increasing rebound dampening, but with backing off compression if not doing major jumps.

  • ckulzer

Posted April 20, 2006 - 09:25 AM

#12

I am surprised that no one has addressed having too much preload on the spring. If you have too much preload, the rear wheel will not track small bumps, especially found in braking zones. Have you checked the sag while on the bike? How about the amount of sag created just by the weight of the bike? If your spring is has too much preload, installing the correct spring rate is the answer. I got rid of all my rear brake chatter/skipping when I installed the correct spring. Worlds of difference!!!




 
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