Tire Changing - My Way !!



8 replies to this topic
  • The_Missile

Posted October 11, 2001 - 10:32 PM

#1

I attempted this for the first time with dread last nite but it turned out to be an easy, albeit sweaty operation ! 30 minutes, without gloves and without bleeding !

I think what really helped me is that I bought specialised tire levers (3) for motorcycles with various 'features' that help you not to pinch the tube, avoid slippage and easily insert the levers where you need them...2 levers about 18 inches long, 1 lever about 1 foot long.

If you only have 2 levers, buy another one to use as a 'holder'. I dont think I could have done it without major frustration if I only had 2.

Terminology/Tips :
- Tire Bead ...this is the part of the tire that fits snug against the rim. One of the most important steps is to "break the bead" or in other words, separate it from the rim edge, inwards towards the centreline of the rim. Its difficult to start this on the first side so be carefull, work slowly and use all of your tire irons. Insert the first, then the second a couple of inches from the first and slowly work around.
- To hold a lever in place wedge it under the disk or sprocket. Make sure it wont slip or you'll find it stuck in the ceiling.
- Fashion a loop and hook out of a piece of safety wire. The lever goes in the loop, the hook on the spoke. Saves needing 3 hands !
- Use a 1x3 inch wooden plank to insert in between the tire bead and the rim. Twist the plank to lift the bead from the rim and you now can get inside the tire to get at the rim locks and tube with ease.

so...
- remove the wheel & air ...doh
- remove nuts from rim locks ( only loosen them if you are changing tube) and remove the tube nut.
- set up 2 3x3 inch high 2 foot long blocks to support the wheel without the sprocket or disk touching the floor.
- insert lever and break bead in one area. This is the most difficult bit. Persevere , use all your levers. Once started, stand on the tire and jump up and down on the tir to help break bead. Do this all around.
- NOTE: IF the tire bead is not FULLY broken from the rim your life will be hell.
- If you are changing the tire turn the wheel over and do the other side.

Now if you are only changing tubes ....
- insert 1x3inch plank in between rim and tire bead and twist it (Spacer). This will lift the edge of the tire so you can get your hand in to pull the tube out. Work around as necessary.
- If appropriate... talc the new tube by putting it in a plastic bag with talc and shaking....nothing works better
- Pre inflate new tube slightly (Enough to hold shape (Avoids pinching)
- Using wood spacer reinsert tube gently around tire.
- To position valve...insert small screwdriver into the hole in the rim and then into top of valve (carefully) and use this to guide & position the valve in the rim. Easy.
- Spread a little bit of lubricant ( i used soap) on the rim and bead and engage one area of the tire bead on the rim. Start over a rim lock. Hold tyre in place with a lever & foot.
- Continue 180 degrees opposite & Work around. Ensure you never finish over a rim lock or the tube.
- The last bit is impossible UNLESS you ensure that the tire bead is not engaged in its final position. Ensure the bead is broken from the rim by standing on the tire to break it away from the rim. The last manouver to engage the last portion should be easy.
- Inflate to about 3 bars (this seats the bead) and then set to correct pressure.
- Fully tighten rim locks & tube nuts.
- Go ride.

If you are changing/reversing tire
- Remove the tube as above to avoid pinching it.
- remove the rim locks... push the bolts into the rim & use the wooden spacer to open the tire up to remove the lock easily.
- Stand the tire upright now
- Remove the other side of the tire from the rim. Work slowly from one point out. It will suddenly 'pop' off.
- Talc the new tire (see below)
- Re-engage one side with the rim & tire upright (use your legs to hold it)
- Uee the wooden spacer to reinstall the rim locks and poke them through the rim and install the nuts but DONT tighten them. This holds them in position so they dont fall out.
- Reinstall the tube & the other side of the tire bead as per above.

Talcum Powder
- If you have a the will, clean the inside of your old tire & dry & talc it copiously.
- Do the same to your tube.
- This will help to avoid pinch flats. I dont know exactly how, but it works.

Enjoy

------------------
The Missile
'99 WR400F
Airbox Lid - gone
Throttle Stop - shorty!
Plastics/Tank/Seat - One Industries
Street Legal

  • yzernie

Posted October 12, 2001 - 12:28 AM

#2

Another great and inexpensive trick. I bought a 30 gallon metal trash can use it to assist in tire changes.

For the rear tires, the bottom diameter of the can is almost exactly the same as the inner diameter of a rear wheel. I cut a hole on the bottom big enough for the sprocket to fit through. It holds the wheel pretty still while completing the change.

For the front tires, the top diameter of the can is almost exactly the same as the inner diameter of a front wheel. Again, it holds the wheel pretty still while completing a change.

The greatest thing is you can still put a trash bag in it and use it for trash. I put a piece of cardboard in the bottom so the edges of the bottom cut will not tear the bag. It is alot cheaper than the expensive tire stands and the lovely wife will use it too!!!!

Ernie

------------------
--Life is too short, work hard...play hard--
Sponsored by Yamaha of Cucamonga, Larry Roeseler's Stroker Fourstroke Speed Equipment and Answer Racing, yzernie@dirtracers.com

  • *mike68*

Posted October 12, 2001 - 02:47 AM

#3

You can change a tire without removing rim locks. Saves time.

yzearnie,
If I use one of my trash cans, I will be working in an area that smells like warm, moldy beer... Posted Image

[This message has been edited by *mike68* (edited October 12, 2001).]

  • yzernie

Posted October 12, 2001 - 03:03 AM

#4

Mike,
What more could a man ask for???!!!!
Ernie


------------------
--Life is too short, work hard...play hard--
Sponsored by Yamaha of Cucamonga, Larry Roeseler's Stroker Fourstroke Speed Equipment and Answer Racing, yzernie@dirtracers.com

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  • *mike68*

Posted October 12, 2001 - 05:09 AM

#5

Not much, I guess. I wasn't thinking straight. Hey, is it beer o'clock yet? Feels like it.

  • yzernie

Posted October 18, 2001 - 05:40 AM

#6

Always beer o'clock. It is after 5pm somewhere in the world!

------------------
--Life is too short, work hard...play hard--
Sponsored by Yamaha of Cucamonga, Larry Roeseler's Stroker Fourstroke Speed Equipment and Answer Racing, yzernie@dirtracers.com

  • The_Missile

Posted October 22, 2001 - 01:17 AM

#7

Just saw a real neat trick in a french magazine on how to install your tube valve through the rim.
Push a tire lever through to the rear side rim (The one you have already engaged one side of the tire on) and lift the tire away from the near side rim so you can get your hand in the oodles of space created....
DOH.............

------------------
The Missile
'99 WR400F
Airbox Lid - gone
Throttle Stop - shorty!
Plastics/Tank/Seat - One Industries
Street Legal

  • neWRiver

Posted October 23, 2001 - 08:45 AM

#8

Neat trick Missile, I always struggle with that stupid thing! I will try that next time.

Here's another spot I always get frustrated on. What is the correct way to get the first bead on when putting a new tire on? When removing the old tire, I find that I can pretty easily pop the bead off each side, leaving the rim loose in the middle of the tire (first removing the tube once one bead is off). Then I can very easily pry the rim and wheel apart by sort of just pulling the rim through one side of the tire. I've been reversing this procedure to put the new tire on. In other words, I first get the rim inside the tire between the two beads. Then I pry the beads on from one side and then the other (inserting tube after one bead is on). But, I always struggle to get the rim in there. It came out of the old tire real easy, but doesn't go on the new tire quite the same way. Am I doing this right? Is there a better/easier way to get that first bead on? I've tried prying the first bead on from the outside of the rim, but that doesn't seem to work. The rim just keeps popping out as I pry at the bead. I feel like I'm missing something here.

  • Scott_F

Posted October 23, 2001 - 09:13 PM

#9

You have the right idea. That's the way I change tires.

Pull both beads off, rim drops in center.

Rotate to valve stem. With rim dropped in center, reach in and pull out stem.

Rotate tire/rim and pull out tube.

With rimlock at top, grab top of rim and pull towards you, while pushing the tire away.

To install new tire, lube both beads. Slam rim into tire at 45* angle. Put foot on rim on other side, and push it down into center of tire. Hold it there and use irons to get the rest of the rim in the center.

Follow previous steps in reverse.




 
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