Why fork rebuilds cost so much.....


21 replies to this topic
  • kshellrazor

Posted 03 April 2006 - 08:33 PM

#1

Decided to dive in and replace my fork seals. Been puttin it off for awhile. Glad I did, looks like my forks need some love. I learned in the process the justification of the cost to replace seals. - This is a fairly easy job, but time consuming, and at bare minimum, the seals and cost of fork oil are a small chunk. Fork oil is expensive. While I was in there, I learned my forks were not equal in oil, the slider bushings are pretty much shot, one of the clicker bars is toast probably from a previous owner turning it in past full, and the oil looked like crud....and this is out of a 2005 CRF250. The twin chamber Showas are probably even more expensive than standard forks. I at least now know it is fairly labor intensive just to replace seals. Pics are below. - I am going to run the bushings as is the rest of the year, reverse the clicker bar, and save a complete revalve and rebuild in the winter. My main concern for the summer were to just replace the oil seals and get some fresh fork oil and levels in. That alone is gonna feel good and plush considering the crud that came out.

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  • supertireguy

Posted 03 April 2006 - 08:38 PM

#2

Yup, there's a fair amount of labor and mess involved in the process.

All forks can benefit from refreshing the oil & seals after a few years of use.

Good to see you taking charge and doing the work yourself.

  • RedRider250X

Posted 03 April 2006 - 09:45 PM

#3

sweet:thumbsup:
I want to learn how to do my own forks someday...

  • matt113

Posted 03 April 2006 - 09:55 PM

#4

i replaced my fork seals a few weeks ago for the first time and it was a whole day thing

  • Dan_Lorenze

Posted 04 April 2006 - 05:05 AM

#5

I've just recently discovered how easy it was too.. I figure a complete service would cost me about 60 bucks total doing it myself. I agree, fork oil is expensive.. And, they sell you a bottle that's short by a couple of ounces so that you're forced to buy two bottles. I'm sure you can buy the stuff by the gallon but my dealer sells the smaller bottles. The greatest part of doing a fork service yourself is the self satisfaction when you're done. My forks have never felt better.

  • CRFThumper

Posted 04 April 2006 - 05:10 AM

#6

I don't know if this is a good thing but we have been using transmission fluid in our Yamaha's KYB's.I was told by a good sours that it was about 7.5 wt and that is what we were looking for.It has been in my wifes wr250 for about 6 mo's with no probs!!!! WAYYYYYYY cheaper to boot.

  • SIEKMANN

Posted 04 April 2006 - 05:19 AM

#7

first time i did them, it was an all day thing and i had to make some custom tools like seal driver to get the job done right. After that, now i can have it torn down and back on the bike in about an hour(this includes time for oil to drain.) It's great to do stuff yourself. the local shop wants $125 to redo your forks... :thumbsup: that. :thumbsup:

  • kshellrazor

Posted 04 April 2006 - 05:41 AM

#8

first time i did them, it was an all day thing and i had to make some custom tools like seal driver to get the job done right. After that, now i can have it torn down and back on the bike in about an hour(this includes time for oil to drain.) It's great to do stuff yourself. the local shop wants $125 to redo your forks... :thumbsup: that. :thumbsup:


Does that include seals and oil? That is one of the cheaper quotes!

  • HalfNutz

Posted 04 April 2006 - 06:50 AM

#9

Nice. Keeping everything clean is the ticket. :thumbsup:

What was up with the fatigued/cracked damper rod? What happened to the end of that?

  • Justa4stroken

Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:36 AM

#10

I sent my Showa forks and rear shock to Factory Connection for rebuild on a a monday, got them back the following monday, total cost was $380. Most well spent $380 I could have done. They performed perfectly and I didn't have to deal with the hassel of dealing with it. :thumbsup:

  • skin290

Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:44 AM

#11

I sent my Showa forks and rear shock to Factory Connection for rebuild on a a monday, got them back the following monday, total cost was $380. Most well spent $380 I could have done. They performed perfectly and I didn't have to deal with the hassel of dealing with it. :thumbsup:


Holy crap, I can get my local susp. guy to give me a new revalve and seal replacement for $350!! You should be able to figure the forks out yourself (shocks are a little harder with the nitrogen gas and stuff), unless the only thing you feel comfortable doing on a bike is the air filter...forks are not hard at all with the correct tools (and you could buy about 4-5 sets of those tools for $380). Plus you know how to fix them if something goes wrong, and you can't wait until next Monday...Just my .02, though...

  • wolf_child

Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:54 AM

#12

Holy crap, I can get my local susp. guy to give me a new revalve and seal replacement for $350!! You should be able to figure the forks out yourself (shocks are a little harder with the nitrogen gas and stuff), unless the only thing you feel comfortable doing on a bike is the air filter...forks are not hard at all with the correct tools (and you could buy about 4-5 sets of those tools for $380). Plus you know how to fix them if something goes wrong, and you can't wait until next Monday...Just my .02, though...

agreed. I sent my forks to RG3 for a full rebuild, revalve. respring. and it only cost me $380, including parts.

  • a_gunslinger

Posted 04 April 2006 - 07:58 AM

#13

No kidding! I bought the Motopowervideo fork maintenance/rebuild video (great video BTW!) and was shocked by all the internal working, pieces and care it took.

  • DethWshBkr

Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:29 AM

#14

Wow. I've never had anyone do mine!

I can usually change out my seals in both legs, put them on and take off, and replace the bushings in about 2 hours.

  • romanmeal

Posted 04 April 2006 - 08:36 AM

#15

Do you guys change the inner cartridge oil when you are in there?

  • Justa4stroken

Posted 04 April 2006 - 10:09 AM

#16

I sent Forks and SHock to them and had them all three pieces done for $380, which includes all parts, fork oil and labor and shipping back too me. I don't know how you figure you can buy the tools and parts to do it yourself cheaper. Plus the hassel of spending a day doing it. Plus you have to have the shock charged by someone after your done with it.

  • Sxdude

Posted 04 April 2006 - 10:15 AM

#17

sweet:thumbsup:
I want to learn how to do my own forks someday...


it's cake once you get the hang of it... i can do mine in relatively short amount of time..

  • Estevahn

Posted 04 April 2006 - 10:22 AM

#18

Changeing fork and shock oil is mostly time consuming. But there are a few things to note for the do it yourselfer. Some of the critical componants in your forks are considered none serviceable. The reason being is they are locked in by either hammer peening or stakeing componants together. Wich makes it very diffecult for the average do it yourselfer to open up and completely inspect for warped or damaged valve stacks etc. If turning the clickers doesn't make any noticable changes in your forks behavior then for sure you'll need to dig deep. Most of the time all they'll need is a good cleaning and fresh oil.
Oh, and those cheap after market fork seals you can buy on line, don't do it.
One good thing about doing forks yourself is you can experiment with the oil viscosity and level to fine tune.
ttfn

  • kshellrazor

Posted 04 April 2006 - 10:48 AM

#19

I sent Forks and SHock to them and had them all three pieces done for $380, which includes all parts, fork oil and labor and shipping back too me. I don't know how you figure you can buy the tools and parts to do it yourself cheaper. Plus the hassel of spending a day doing it. Plus you have to have the shock charged by someone after your done with it.


My fork seal driver was $40. Oil is about $20. Seals $20. Saved me $300. Chances are they did not even touch your shock. Plus, knowing I have the satisfaction of it done right. You should have seen the oil seal I pulled out - someone was in them before. The oil levels were way off, they seals were cheap green ones that needed another backing plate in it just to get everything to line up - then wonder why they leak so bad? - Do it yourself, and know it was done right, that is why I do it.....and to an earlier post, yes, I did both chambers....

  • txfour

Posted 04 April 2006 - 12:48 PM

#20

What does anyone think about the race-tech kit you can buy and have access to their tech service if you get stumped on the install?

http://www.race-tech...s&showPage=dirt





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