scotts stabilizer mount



9 replies to this topic
  • AK-thumper

Posted October 08, 2001 - 08:50 PM

#1

I've got one of these on my WR with the headstock ring mount. Every time I crash at speed the mount comes off. Is this normal? I haven't adjusted the high speed damping since I bought it. It seats completely. Last time I crashed hard it came off and I torqued it as tight as I dare but it came off again this weekend. Anybody got an easy solution? Anybody have pictures of the weld-on mount on a WR?

I know not crashing would be a seemingly simple solution, but probably not practical for me. This weekend I decided to wheelie across a 20' wide 6" deep creek in third gear. Turned out it was more like 30" deep. My bike and I made it across the hard way.

The scotts salesman convinced me not to put a pad over the stabilizer but this incident changed my mind. The little bastard tagged me in the groin as I flew over the bars.

On a more pleasant note, several TTers have inquired about the gas mileage improvement with the BK mod. I noticed a big improvement this weekend. I don't have an Odometer but I've done the same ride before and had a lot more gas left over this time. Runs better too.

  • samohT

Posted October 09, 2001 - 01:10 AM

#2

You can find pictures at scotts page.
http://www.scottsperformance.com

  • crazyadam

Posted October 09, 2001 - 05:16 AM

#3

I try not to crash too hard.. but **it happens! I have never had a problem with my bolt on mount. and I have the damper set STIFF. like 3-4 notches from locked ( no movement) Maybe there is a little weld in the way, keeping the clamp from making full contact.

  • Dan_Lorenze

Posted October 09, 2001 - 05:32 AM

#4

AK, What year WR do you have? Which mount do you have? The oil filler mount (ring) or the headset mount (ring)?? This used to happen to me...

  • AK-thumper

Posted October 10, 2001 - 07:34 AM

#5

'01 WR
Headstock bolt-on mount. It seats completely (no welds in way) but I didn't trim the seal back. I tighten it as tight as it will go with a standard 3-4" allen wrench. Any tighter will require an allen-socket, and new bolts after I strip them out.

When it comes off it just rotates off the headstock and moves with the handlebars.

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  • dwby2kwr

Posted October 10, 2001 - 03:44 PM

#6

I've had a couple of good crashes and mine has never come loose. First off, check to make sure it is not setting on the bearing seal. I had to trim mine a lot. if still having problems contact Scott's, they seem very helpful. If all that fails just weld it on should only take a couple of tack welds to hold it. BTW I run my high speed as tight as it will go and base between 4 and 8 clicks out.

------------------
y2k wr, airbox lid removed, 180 main, 48 pilot, 426yz er needle,
wr timing, WB E-series S-bend w/ tapered head pipe
acerbis tank(yz), sdg seat(yz), scotts damper

  • darbsitton

Posted October 14, 2001 - 03:34 PM

#7

AK,

If you did not trim the seal, I do not see how the mount could be "seated completely" as the seal will keep the mount a millimiter or so higher than it should be. This reduction in clamping area may be contributing to your problem.

You do not need to trim very much from the seal in order to get the mount to seat well. An Xacto knife works great. I don't think the seals performance will be significantly affected as all important things are still covered.

In addition, I incrementally tightened the 2 bolts using a normal allen wrench and a fishing scale* to make sure they were being tighened evenly and to the manufacturers specification of 4 foot pounds. They make a very BIG deal about proper installation of the mount. I was suprised at how hard I had to torque down, but the bolts didn't break and so far it has not come off.
* Using a fishing scale, I could determine the amount of force being put on the allen wrench. I then measured the length of the wrench at the point where I hooked the wrench.
Torque = (Force) x (Length of Wrench)
4 foot pounds = 4 pounds of pressure on a 1 foot (12 inch) wrench
You can also use 8 pounds on a 6 inch wrench
or 12 pounds on a 4 inch wrench
or 16 pounds on a 3 inch wrench
All of these are 4 foot pounds (or 48 inch pounds)
Hope this helps.

  • John_H

Posted October 19, 2001 - 06:30 AM

#8

darb,
Just stuck my scott's on and haven't ridden yet. I don't think you need to trim that seal though. After I did it, I realized I could have just sat the clamp on the steering head and used a small screwdriver to lift the edge of the seal up over the clamp, but like you said, the trimming won't hurt anything. I didn't have a 3mm hex socket either so I decided to buy one(I like to use my torque wrench). No luck at sears, autozone, pep-boys and NAPA. Finally went to a Tool store and paid $8. Worst part was I left it on the counter along with the screw and had to go back. I used your fishing scale method recently when tightening the steering ring nut. Took a pair of sears robogrips which clamped right on to it, extended the robogrips to 12 inches and tightened it with the scale.

  • YZ400Court

Posted October 19, 2001 - 10:38 AM

#9

Just tack weld it on either side. No more slipping, and still easy enougy to remove (a little grinding is easy). I have the oil filler neck mount, and had to tack it to keep it in place.

------------------
Pretend it's flat and give it the gas.

  • Moto-Mike

Posted October 19, 2001 - 11:43 AM

#10

Check that you are not hitting the post against the top triple clamp. I found that centering was very critical...even with it perfectly centered the post came very close to both sides of the upper triple clamp when the bars were rotated to the steering stops. I ended up having to file some grooves in the triple clamp for clearance with the post. A crash could slam the triple clamp into the stabilizer post and put a great deal of load on your clamp.

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2000 Yamaha WR400F
1988 Honda NT650 Hawk
1977 Suzuki RM250B
1974 Honda XR75K1




 
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