Oil Drain Plug Problems


9 replies to this topic
  • bbgun9x

Posted March 27, 2006 - 07:55 PM

#1

I bought a used '03 YZF 450. I drained the oil and went to install the large drain bolt at the rear of the crankcase and it's stripped. It will not tighten down. I then tried using the Permatex thread repair kit (epoxy) and I got it to tighten down. I went to change my oil again and now I cannot get the bolt to tighten down. Anybody know of any quick fixes?? I've got to race this weekend, so I need something quick and simple. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Brad

  • new2blu

Posted March 27, 2006 - 08:26 PM

#2

Get a Heli-coil threaded insert and replace the threads. Here is a link www.helicoil.com click on the Heli coil section. I guess you could get a tap the next bolt size larger and use a bolt the next size larger with a washer on it. I would feel more comfortable with the Heli-coil though. I wouldn't feel very comfortable with a quick and easy fix--that bolt holds all the oil from coming out.

  • bbgun9x

Posted March 27, 2006 - 08:38 PM

#3

Is that a quick fix? Would I have to take the engine out of the bike? I've never heli-coiled anything before.

Any other ideas for a quick fix??

Thanks,

Brad

  • new2blu

Posted March 27, 2006 - 09:02 PM

#4

Sorry, can't think of any other ideas. You probably wouldn,t need to take out the engine just open up the oil drain hole with the supplied drill bit then screw in the new thereded insert. You would need to keep the metal shavings from getting in the engine: Either 1. putting lots of grease on the drill bit to catch the shavings or 2. add oil with drain plug out to flush out the metal. (The Heli-coil kit comes with a drill bit , threaded insert, and thread inserter tool)

  • DrThumper

Posted March 29, 2006 - 09:09 AM

#5

Go to your local automotive shop and get an oversized oil pan drain bolt for stripped oil pans. Its basically a larger bolt with a smaller bolt in its center. Tap out your case for the new larger bolt. Its just barely larger than your existing bolt and doesn't require any drilling. Install the new larger bolt with an epoxy or the like, just to make sure it doesn't vibrate out.The tap you'll need is SAE, not metric, as well as the bolt heads...5/8th and 9/16th as I recall.

When its time to change oil, just use two wrenches, one on the larger just to ensure you don't crack your epoxy and one wrench on the little inside bolt.

I did this repair 4 years ago and its still doing a great job. I was prepared to do a helicoil job if this didn't work, but I'm still waiting for it to fail.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • grayracer513

Posted March 29, 2006 - 10:29 AM

#6

Go to your local automotive shop and get an oversized oil pan drain bolt for stripped oil pans. ...

I did this repair 4 years ago and its still doing a great job. I was prepared to do a helicoil job if this didn't work, but I'm still waiting for it to fail.

M-I-C, K-E-Y (no offense)

Why not just do a Time-Sert or Heli-Coil to begin with? It's nearly that simple, and results in a real, professional repair. The Time-Sert is preferable because it's actually easier for most people to install, and is much more likely to be square once installed.

  • DrThumper

Posted March 29, 2006 - 10:54 AM

#7

Mickey Mouse is over 50 yrs old......

Hey it works, its solid, it looks good. What more do you want? There isn't much material down there to screw with. Unless you know what your doing with a helicoil or a time-sert you can really F*%$-it up! This way, you still have a second chance with the above mentioned fixes....if you F*%$ up this way, which is hard to do.

Beleive me, I don't like to n-word rig anything, this IS a solid fix. I've had a few MC mechanics see it and like it. I worked in a local MC shop for awhile (being semi-retired, I went for a dream job) they loved it and used it on a few bikes that couldn't be salvaged any other way.

  • Fly-nBri

Posted March 29, 2006 - 11:33 AM

#8

I did the heli coil method and it's still going strong 3 years later. I cleaned the surface of all oil and used red lok tite to hold in the coil. Let it dry for a few hours or you'll be turning the heli coil when it comes time to take out the drain plug. :thumbsup: No problems!

  • grayracer513

Posted March 29, 2006 - 11:41 AM

#9

Mickey Mouse is over 50 yrs old......

So am I. And during more than 30 years as a professional M/C, car and light truck technician, I've seen the repair you speak of several times. It requires a drill, and it requires a tap; so does a Time-Sert. Heli-Coils are a bit difficult to insert properly, but if you can screw a bolt in, you can install a Time-Sert. As far as fritzing the operation up, the Time-Sert eliminates the concern of the sealing surface being out of square by including a counterbore, or spot facer, in the kit. You could do that with the other solutions, but you'd have to hunt down your own tools.

  • yogist

Posted March 29, 2006 - 07:07 PM

#10

Im a machinist, I install keenserts and helicoils all the time in aerospace parts...Its the best way to permantly fix your problem..Take your time do it right..





Related Content

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.