2006 YZ450 "after first ride" impressions.


56 replies to this topic
  • yz133rider

Posted March 06, 2006 - 01:14 PM

#41

I think the problem would mostly be jetting issue. The rekluse should help make is alot easier to ride as well if you set it up right. Cornering I really believe is just the tire. Maybe move the forks up a touch more.

  • sbrown

Posted March 06, 2006 - 09:59 PM

#42

I just got back from racing this weekend. I moved the forks about a 1/8 inch below the line on the forks and the turning really increased without headshake. I'm still using the 739 and its tolerable but I know there are better tires and will put one on as soon as I wear the edges off the 739. With about 7.5 hours on the bike, the suspension has softened a little bit and I have liked it since I first rode it and I am using stock settings but weight about 178 lbs and 5'10 and race 40+ Intermediate. The bike really turns a lot better and the engine is so much easier to use than my previous 04. I rode afriend's btrand new 06 CRF 450 and really didnt feel that it turned better than my bike and the engine was definitely not as smooth. Plus the 06 YZ 450 is so light feeling in the air that I would comapare its feel to that of a 250F as far as flickability is concerned. Ibeleive that all bikes need careful setup for the individual rider. Once thats done, and rear suspension sag is really critical, 100 mm is a good starting point. Then play with it by lowering it and making it ride higher until it feel just right to you.

  • PK

Posted March 07, 2006 - 07:48 AM

#43

Sbrown, did you race the Old Timers race in Phoenix? My buddy drove from Texas for it, said it was a great race last year...

  • DSMotorsport

Posted March 07, 2006 - 07:31 PM

#44

Ha Went to reset the sag today. I was running 121mm of sag after 1.5 hours of run time. I guess the suspension does really break in alot, it was just at 101mm when the bike was new so I didn't play with it. That can probobly explain the sketchy steering even with the fork slid up to the line.

  • yz_for_me

Posted March 07, 2006 - 08:41 PM

#45

Ha Went to reset the sag today. I was running 121mm of sag after 1.5 hours of run time. I guess the suspension does really break in alot, it was just at 101mm when the bike was new so I didn't play with it. That can probobly explain the sketchy steering even with the fork slid up to the line.


Whoa, yea that might have something to do with it. Hopefully your good to go now.

  • stknrdr

Posted March 08, 2006 - 08:03 AM

#46

Ha Went to reset the sag today. I was running 121mm of sag after 1.5 hours of run time. I guess the suspension does really break in alot, it was just at 101mm when the bike was new so I didn't play with it. That can probobly explain the sketchy steering even with the fork slid up to the line.



I did the same thing yesterday...I was at 125mm or so after break in. It feels a little wierd now with the preload all cranked up in the back....well see how she rides first chance i get to hit the track.

  • beezer

Posted March 08, 2006 - 01:10 PM

#47

I think anybody over 200 pounds needs stiffer springs.

To set the sag with to much preload makes the bike stiff on the little stuff.

I wonder what a TI rear spring goes for.

Or maybe Jenny Craig might be cheaper.

  • jimyz

Posted March 08, 2006 - 01:24 PM

#48

Get a two stroke yz250, no more valves, noise issues, handles better, much cheaper maintenance, and will put a wet spot in the front of your pants, if you can hang on! Hope you enjoy your 450-

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • stknrdr

Posted March 08, 2006 - 02:29 PM

#49

I think anybody over 200 pounds needs stiffer springs.

To set the sag with to much preload makes the bike stiff on the little stuff.

I wonder what a TI rear spring goes for.

Or maybe Jenny Craig might be cheaper.



Have you priced Jenny Craig lately?

  • NYMXer

Posted March 08, 2006 - 02:46 PM

#50

Get a two stroke yz250, no more valves, noise issues, handles better, much cheaper maintenance, and will put a wet spot in the front of your pants, if you can hang on! Hope you enjoy your 450-



Oh man, if you don't sound just like me only a short month ago........ :thumbsup: then.........I went to the 450 Yammie. I don't talk like that no more! :bonk: Lap times don't lie and, I can ride faster........longer. :thumbsup:

  • SureBlue

Posted March 08, 2006 - 07:22 PM

#51

Agree NYMXer, I had both a 04 YZ450 and a 05 YZ125 last summer, rode them back to back and was quicker with the pinger. But this 06 450 puts a smile on my face, already winter riding tells me this bike is quick and smooth. No more pingers to me either.

  • aford541

Posted March 08, 2006 - 11:28 PM

#52

I think anybody over 200 pounds needs stiffer springs.

To set the sag with to much preload makes the bike stiff on the little stuff.

I wonder what a TI rear spring goes for.

Or maybe Jenny Craig might be cheaper.



I totally agree, on my 05 YZ 450 I had .48 fork springs and 6.0 shock spring at 100mm it turned very well for an 05
My 06 has .50 springs and the same 6.0 rear ti spring, Enzo recommended 6.2 rear spring for my fat butt so I need Jenny Craig also. My point is the bike seems imbalanced and would really benefit from the 6.2 spring.

  • Oouthere

Posted March 11, 2006 - 07:05 AM

#53

Just a suggestion on breaking in the suspension on new bikes. We've only had a few new mx bikes but always turn the compression completely out unless she was bottoming. Once things loosen-up, then start fine tuning the old girl. This made our initial rides much less harsh and enjoyable. Our general rule of thumb is irregardless of your riding abilities, you should be using all of your suspension.

Now that my WR is sold, I'm seeing a glimmer of light for the '06 YZF.....

Rich

  • Drfletcherdc

Posted March 11, 2006 - 07:09 AM

#54

I totally agree, on my 05 YZ 450 I had .48 fork springs and 6.0 shock spring at 100mm it turned very well for an 05
My 06 has .50 springs and the same 6.0 rear ti spring, Enzo recommended 6.2 rear spring for my fat butt so I need Jenny Craig also. My point is the bike seems imbalanced and would really benefit from the 6.2 spring.


The one downfall to changing the rear spring is the Yamaha Ti spring is incredible. If you are under 220 you should try to keep it. Destry Abbott who is a Team Kawi rider who uses only Pro Circuit has that spring on his bike. All of Pro Circuit riders use that spring. So try to keep it if you can.

  • Whoya

Posted March 11, 2006 - 07:56 AM

#55

I hope you don’t get offended by this, but the YZ450 wasn’t designed, built or setup for a rider like you. The target rider for the YZ450 is a 150-170lbs fast intermediate or expert motocrosser. I understand that not everyone that wants or buys a bike like this fits into that category, but if you don’t, you have to realize that you’ll have to make lots of changes and adjustments before it works for you. And it may never work perfectly for you.

For the target rider, it’s by far the best Yamaha has every made. If you go into berms at the top of 3rd gear, not 1st or 2nd, the bike will corner like it’s on rails. If you overjump an 80 foot tabletop you’ll be amazed at how the suspension handles it. If Doug Henry had suspension like this years ago, he might not have broken both his arms on that one he overjumped. If you go through huge whoops at full throttle going 50-60mph, the bike will take them without so much as a twitch, instead of kicking and bucking you off like bikes used to do. If you go through them at 10 or 20mph, you can’t expect the bike to work properly, that’s just not how it’s designed.

I know you can’t turn into a fast intermediate or expert overnight, and I know you can’t just change your body to fit into the target weight range. I’m just saying be a little more understanding with the bike and realize that it wasn’t built for the way you’re riding it. These bikes are made with a specific purpose and rider in mind, if you’re lucky enough to fit into that range, the bike is incredible right out of the box. (Except for that ridiculously lean pilot.)

Get the suspension closer to your liking and find someone that can help your riding skills improve so you'll be doing those turns and jumps faster and bigger. As that happens the bike will only work better for you.


Good insight.... I guess this means I should be looking at the WR or the 450X...

  • Ga426owner

Posted March 11, 2006 - 08:21 AM

#56

Just curious does Yamaha sell other springrates for the Yami built Ti spring?

  • mxmark

Posted March 11, 2006 - 09:47 AM

#57

Just curious does Yamaha sell other springrates for the Yami built Ti spring?


Yes they do.
1C3-22212-20-00 (K=48N/MM)
1C3-22212-00-00 (K=44N/MM)
1C3-22212-10-00 (K=46N/MM)
1C3-22212-30-00 (K=50N/MM)
1C3-22212-40-00 (K=52N/MM)
1C3-22212-50-00 (K=54N/MM) STD on YZ450F 06
1C3-22212-60-00 (K=55.8N/MM)
Retail $398.65
Thank you, Mark





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