Riding technique


10 replies to this topic
  • Punisher660

Posted February 27, 2006 - 09:20 AM

#1

I'm not sure if this is the right place to post, but since the question is model specific, here goes -

WR450 in the sand:

The bike sucks A$$ in the sand. The front end wants to dive all the time and it seems so front end heavy! Is this a matter of riding technique or do other WR riders feel the same way?

I didn't have this issue on my CR500 or CR250? It rides very well everywhere else, but once the ground gets soft (even loam on the MX track), the front end feels like it wants to wash out. It seems like a lot of the problem is bike weight - too heavy up high and foreward. Would making a switch to an '05 seat/tank or YZ seat/tank help? would a damper correct this? how about pulling the fron light, odometer assemble?

Or do I need to simply change my riding style on the sand?

  • ArizonaThumper

Posted February 27, 2006 - 09:58 AM

#2

Do the following.

1. 4-5 psi in front.
2. Decrease the rear compression damp.
3. Increase rear sag
4. Add more compression damp to front.
5. shift your body weight to the rear.
6. Go fast, the fast you go the more your front will float.

  • clark4131

Posted February 27, 2006 - 10:05 AM

#3

I had mine in sand all day yesterday and it kicked, rather than sucked ass. I had no issues with front end dive unless I did something dumb like chopping the throttle, and I even left my front tire pressure around 14 PSI. I did have a sand paddle on the rear, but I adjusted my style to keep the rear end weighted...SC

  • Indy_WR450

Posted February 27, 2006 - 10:47 AM

#4

4 strokes have heavier front end weigth bias. You have to stay on the gas and accelerate more on a four stroke then you do on 2 smoke. Front end tucks are best handled by keeping your body weight further rearward and adding throttle during the slow down or braking manuvere whenever she starts to dive. Lower pressure front tire and wider front tire will help with staying on top. You do have to adjust your riding style from a 2 stroke. The 4 strokes are very good in sand once you get adjusted to them. :thumbsup:

  • Punisher660

Posted February 27, 2006 - 11:23 AM

#5

4 strokes have heavier front end weigth bias. You have to stay on the gas and accelerate more on a four stroke then you do on 2 smoke. The 4 strokes are very good in sand once you get adjusted to them. :thumbsup:



That is what I needed to find out - so the heavy feeling I am experiancing is 4 stokes in general, not just the WR.

I havn't done any dunes riding yet, I am mostly seeing the issue when I am in the sand washes or crossing dunes to get to other trails (read Moab) - so adjusting tire preassure is not really an option. I was beginning to think it was just an issue with the WR being a little heavier than the YZ, (thats why I thought about stripping off some of the weight with a YZ tank) but if 4 strokes are front end heavier in general I guess its me that will have to adjust.

Thanks guys :thumbsup:

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  • RaphFoFiddy

Posted February 27, 2006 - 11:26 AM

#6

I keep the front at about 7psi, but I think it's the angle of the forks that makes it wash so easily. Other things brought up were the stock tire which all my riding friends feel is the worst front tire you can get.
WWW.Offroad.com went with an aftermarket triple clamp for thier 03 project bike to lessen the angle of the forks and feel it has done wonders, so outside of adjusting technique (keeping the front end light) I'd go:

1)keep tire pressure 4-8psi
2)better front tire
3)aftermarket triple clamp to lessen angle

But hey I'm a newb, and this is the only bike i know so take it with a grain of salt.




"I'm helping"- Sea Lab 2020

  • SJMC_DON

Posted February 27, 2006 - 11:57 AM

#7

4th gear WFO :thumbsup:

I probably had 20 PSI in the front this day because most of the day was spent in the rocks / desert.

http://stumpjumpers..../56981588-L.jpg

  • kskyles

Posted February 27, 2006 - 01:22 PM

#8

I spend a lot of time in deep sandy washes in my favorite riding areas. All three of my 4-strokes behaved the same....diving front end - etc..

You just have to lean back and open the throttle. You should be able to float right through it. Be smooth on the throttle to stop.

  • dez4ever

Posted February 27, 2006 - 02:17 PM

#9

[QUOTE=RaphFoFiddy
1)keep tire pressure 4-8psi




Unless you are only riding in sand dropping the pressure that low is not a wise thing to do. You will encounter a whole new set of handling problems after you get a pinch flat from having such little air in the front tire.

A lot of learning how to turn the four strokes in the sand is throttle control. Once you learn how to do it most of your steering can be controlled by how much or little throttle you use.

Just my .02

  • Punisher660

Posted February 27, 2006 - 02:54 PM

#10

So I guess like Indy says....it will come with time on the 4 stroker :thumbsup:

  • dez4ever

Posted February 27, 2006 - 05:13 PM

#11

Seat time may man, seat time.




 
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