First ride with Rekluse, WOW!!!


95 replies to this topic
  • dirtysouth

Posted August 23, 2006 - 06:46 PM

#81

So does this mean the bike will free wheel once the RPM's are below 1800? I actually have learned to like and use the WR's engine breaking when cornering and going down really sketchy, gnarly downhills. I raced a KTM 380 two stroke a couple of weeks back and nearly killed myself at the first big downhill I came to! I let off the throttle at the crest of the hill expecting some engine breaking and nearly shat myself when I flew over the top!! :ride:



that shit is funny... :thumbsup: ...I rely on the braking too

  • Chasejj

Posted August 24, 2006 - 08:06 AM

#82

I am aware of numerous instances where the RevLoc has proven to work better than the Rekluse in big bore engines, several of which I have personally witnessed and verified. This situation has been well documented in ThumperTalk, KTMtalk and Husaberg.org.

The main problem area with the Rekluse, at least in its current configuration, is that the clutch plates don't lock up tight enough during mid rpm situations.

For several of these instances, click
here, here, and here.


I read through those threads and agree with you that there is some indication that on big bore bikes there may be an issue. Not sure that constitutes "proof".
I try to not flame out a reputable businesses with bold statements like that as these forums are ripe with one sided accounts of problems that cost someone money. Proof would be the repetition of large numbers of failures(like Honda CRF valves). I haven't seen that kind of trail of evidence in KTMalk anyway(where I have spent most of my time) in many years of monitoring.
That said Dave V. and Revloc have earned my trust over the years and provided excellent support when needed(not much at all).But Rekluse is a viable option for many and I'm not ready to throw them under a bus, even here. Their Dual LHRB Kit seems like the best system available for the Yamaha anyway, which is what I am looking into switching to this year. :thumbsup:

Thanks for the threads.

  • Chas_M

Posted August 24, 2006 - 09:14 AM

#83

I read through those threads and agree with you that there is some indication that on big bore bikes there may be an issue. Not sure that constitutes "proof".

I try to not flame out a reputable businesses with bold statements like that as these forums are ripe with one sided accounts of problems that cost someone money. Proof would be the repetition of large numbers of failures(like Honda CRF valves). I haven't seen that kind of trail of evidence in KTMalk anyway(where I have spent most of my time) in many years of monitoring.


If not 'proof', you may call it 'evidence'.

I don't consider these to be 'bold statements', especially when said company has publicly acknowledged problems with using their product in big bore high torque engines.

  • Express

Posted January 21, 2007 - 07:28 PM

#84

Going to dig up an old thread here. I've been reading over the old posts about the AC before I make the purchase for my 06 WR450.

My bike has been plated but only for the purpose of getting to the trail. I usually have a 10 mile or greater ride to get to my riding spots. Will this type of ride cause premature wear or have any type of adverse effect on the clutch?

I understand the operation of the clutch but Im not sure of the set-up I would want. I probably ride technical trails more than half my ride time. I think I'd like the left hand rear brake but have read various points of view on keeping the rear brake peddle. Some have said the effectivness of the rear brake peddle is diminished is this true? Can a pressure switch be installed on the LHRB?

I've also read about adding a small clutch lever after installing the LHRB, Im lost on this one. How and or why?

If I go with the LHRB does this eliminate the possibility of adding the actuator for the AC?

It seems the ability to adjust from the perch is almost a must. Am I correct on that?

Brian

  • OringGroove

Posted January 25, 2007 - 12:10 PM

#85

I must be one of the few who have had problems with the Rekluse!
I installed it but could not get the bike running with it :ride: Went thru the process again and again. Checked everything twice, had someone watch me and still the bike did not like it :ride: Finally got it running with it! took it for a ride and smoked the clutch plates :ride: Replaced the plates $$$ and started again. This time set the gap for the plates much wider. The bike runs fine, if the gap on these is too tight you can end up with the bike pushing in gear at low revs and smoked clutch plates. Set the gap with rekluses wider!
You loose the ability to bump start the bike :applause:
You loose the drop the clutch accelleration.
You loose a clutch lever!
You gain better control by hanging on with a better death grip.(left hand)
You gain the potential to have a rear brake like a push bike!(left hand) kinda defeats the first gain lol.
I think I'll like the Rekluse when it is worn in more! Or maybe when I'm more used to it!
After spending big dollars on this item I have to say I'm not really happy yet!
In terms of my bike I have, 06 WR450 Dr D pipe, JD jetting, MSC stearing dampner, heavier springs. I believe the best thing to buy would be a dampner.
Forget the Rekluse unless you have spare coin!
That said the guys at Rekluse are excellent and the supplier in Oz is very helpfull!
I can ride longer now with less fatigue using the clutch (due to heavy feel) but, this could be fixed with a hydraulic clutch anyway. Super light feel to them. Also I tend now to leave the bike in a higher gear because it is just easier.
I'll know when I have clocked up another 1000km on this bike if the Rekluse is up to the task.
Also I see a few bikes are coming out with slipper clutches standard so it wont be too long till they all have em!

  • byggd

Posted January 25, 2007 - 03:00 PM

#86

I must be one of the few who have had problems with the Rekluse!
I installed it but could not get the bike running with it :ride: Went thru the process again and again. Checked everything twice, had someone watch me and still the bike did not like it :ride: Finally got it running with it! took it for a ride and smoked the clutch plates :applause: Replaced the plates $$$ and started again. This time set the gap for the plates much wider. The bike runs fine, if the gap on these is too tight you can end up with the bike pushing in gear at low revs and smoked clutch plates. Set the gap with rekluses wider!
You loose the ability to bump start the bike :naughty:
You loose the drop the clutch accelleration.
You loose a clutch lever!
You gain better control by hanging on with a better death grip.(left hand)
You gain the potential to have a rear brake like a push bike!(left hand) kinda defeats the first gain lol.
I think I'll like the Rekluse when it is worn in more! Or maybe when I'm more used to it!
After spending big dollars on this item I have to say I'm not really happy yet!
In terms of my bike I have, 06 WR450 Dr D pipe, JD jetting, MSC stearing dampner, heavier springs. I believe the best thing to buy would be a dampner.
Forget the Rekluse unless you have spare coin!
That said the guys at Rekluse are excellent and the supplier in Oz is very helpfull!
I can ride longer now with less fatigue using the clutch (due to heavy feel) but, this could be fixed with a hydraulic clutch anyway. Super light feel to them. Also I tend now to leave the bike in a higher gear because it is just easier.
I'll know when I have clocked up another 1000km on this bike if the Rekluse is up to the task.
Also I see a few bikes are coming out with slipper clutches standard so it wont be too long till they all have em!

Did you call Rekluse when you first had the problem? They have awesome customer service and the guys who answer the phones actually ride and use the product, unlike some places that just read from a screen after typing your question in.
I set mine tight with the theory that the gap will increase as the plates wear. No problems yet! :ride:

  • SXP

Posted January 25, 2007 - 07:41 PM

#87

I have a Rekluse on my WR400/444. I can't seem to get it to work for my style of riding which is mostly riding a gear higher and using the low end torque of the motor to haul me around. I've tried all kinds of gap/ball combinations and the clutch still slips too much for my liking. The plates are totally blue and I suspect I'll be looking at new discs/plates pretty soon. From my experience, if you want this system to work for you, you have to keep the revs up. I don't believe it's a problem with the product, rather my riding style doesn't match the operation of the clutch.

I'll be putting mine up for sale soon.

  • Matt James

Posted January 25, 2007 - 09:34 PM

#88

The rekluse is good and I have friends that have used them for over a year.
The only bad thing is if you slip the clutch alot (to high of a gear for speed) it generates alot more clutch debri into the oil and this same oil lubes the entire engine. I would say change your oil more often.

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  • pops 56

Posted January 26, 2007 - 01:49 AM

#89

I ride wide open desert 99% of the time here . Just taken the Rekluse out as i was rebuilding the motor .No wear at all on the clutch ect. 6 Months use no probs so far.:ride:

  • velosapiens

Posted January 26, 2007 - 08:48 AM

#90

I could not find a time that I wanted to overide what the rekluse was doing.


i can easily find a time when i want to override it, but i have only ridden bikes that had the override (ktm's and husabergs).

my preference is to have it engage just off idle, and just ride like normal, using the clutch just like normal, and just have the rekluse prevent stalls at low speeds and extreme technical stuff and brake-sliding and stuff.

if i raced a 4-stroke (esp a kickstart, like a yz450f) i'd probably get one, but the 2-stroke is so much more resistant to stalling that i've never felt the need to actually buy a rekluse. for trailriding, i find it unnecessary, but your mileage may vary. it seems like in general, very skilled riders are not as enamored of the auto-clutch as more intermediate or novice riders, but there are definitely some very very skilled riders i know that do like an auto-clutch. not for everyone, but it's good that we have the choice.

  • bigdrtrdr

Posted January 26, 2007 - 10:59 AM

#91

Haven't ridden a A/C'ed bike yet. I have been rideing bikes for so long I don't know if I could do it. :ride: My main concern would be increased wear and tear on the clutch and tranny. Any body have a long term report to give? Just doesn't seem that the drive system was designed to operate that way. Correct me if I'm wrong but unless you bring the RPM's down to the disengagement point aren't you just jamming the thing into the next gear with no disengagement?

-Lowedog


I can give you a long term report, I put the Rekluse in at about the 4000 mile mark on my 01 WR426. I now have about 6400 miles on the bike. In that time the stock clutch plates both friction and drive are still in spec. The only problem I've had is that I wore out the Rekluse pressure plate and top plate to the point where a couple of the balls were sticking in the fully engaged position. Which will stall the motor. Rekluse replaced the parts at there cost to me and I havent had any issues since.
My transmission still shifts as well as the day I bought the bike.

  • SXP

Posted January 26, 2007 - 11:09 AM

#92

I can give you a long term report, I put the Rekluse in at about the 4000 mile mark on my 01 WR426. I now have about 6400 miles on the bike. In that time the stock clutch plates both friction and drive are still in spec. The only problem I've had is that I wore out the Rekluse pressure plate and top plate to the point where a couple of the balls were sticking in the fully engaged position. Which will stall the motor. Rekluse replaced the parts at there cost to me and I havent had any issues since.
My transmission still shifts as well as the day I bought the bike.


Do you keep the engine revs in the meat of the powerband when you ride? I ask 'cause my riding style is to short-shift and lug the motor using the low end torque of the bike to haul me around. This style just didn't play too well with the Rekluse and it slipped too much causing the plates to blue, not to mention a lack of forward motion when I needed it in a hurry.

  • bigdrtrdr

Posted January 26, 2007 - 11:29 AM

#93

Do you keep the engine revs in the meat of the powerband when you ride? I ask 'cause my riding style is to short-shift and lug the motor using the low end torque of the bike to haul me around. This style just didn't play too well with the Rekluse and it slipped too much causing the plates to blue, not to mention a lack of forward motion when I needed it in a hurry.


Ya I ride in the meat of the power.

Your riding style and the auto clutch wont get along very well.

  • ncmountainman

Posted January 26, 2007 - 11:33 AM

#94

i tend to ride mine down low? and i've run a rekluse since 04,you just have to tune the clutch and bike to jive:thumbsup:

  • SXP

Posted January 26, 2007 - 01:01 PM

#95

i tend to ride mine down low? and i've run a rekluse since 04,you just have to tune the clutch and bike to jive:thumbsup:


I tried playing with the gap and also used the 5 TC balls provided. Still slipped too much unless the revs were up.

  • ncmountainman

Posted January 26, 2007 - 01:14 PM

#96

I tried playing with the gap and also used the 5 TC balls provided. Still slipped too much unless the revs were up.


thats weird,i ran 5 tc's on my 04 wr and 3 on my yz. i get instant engagement (i even have to run the heavier spring to slow it down some)and can control how fast it engages with the throttle. how is your throttle response off idle? maybe the multiplied torque from the rekluse was too much for your engines state of tune:excuseme: i've found you can only do so much tuning the rekluse then you have to start making the engine match up with the engagement ie;jetting,cams/timing,exhaust,etc...:ride:




 
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