suspension rebuild


7 replies to this topic
  • strippedthread1

Posted January 16, 2006 - 06:07 PM

#1

I've had my 02 BRP for about 3 months and, in the past week, installed Eibach springs front and rear along with new bearings, bushings and seals. I'm a 240lbs. rider and used .47 in front and 11 in the back. WOW! It is like riding a whole new machine.
Glad I tore into the project as the forks were full of mucus and all the rear bearings and bushings were gone. Pivot Works makes some good stuff.

  • Koko Azuela

Posted January 17, 2006 - 05:50 PM

#2

Good deal man, Ride ON :thumbsup:

  • Thumpmeister

Posted January 17, 2006 - 10:28 PM

#3

I did the same thing last weekend w/ the same specs, except my bike is an 00. I did an Eibach in the rear, and Race-tech up front w/ heavier oil. I drained the oil out of the forks, and it looked like mud, and felt like snot. Now I feel like I have to get used to riding a different bike.

  • snaggleXR650

Posted January 18, 2006 - 05:01 AM

#4

Hello,
I'm in serious need to install heavier springs and freshen everything up on my 2000 BRP, but have put it off WAY to long due to lack of the special Honda tools and experience with suspension stuff.

Where do you recommend buying the Eibach springs, and what weight vs. spring guide did you use? I'm 220lbs.

Did you buy all the special fork/swingarm tools, or did you make them from the instructions at the Pig Pen?

I really don't even know how to start on a job like this. Glad you had good luck with yours. Thanks for any info.

I've had my 02 BRP for about 3 months and, in the past week, installed Eibach springs front and rear along with new bearings, bushings and seals. I'm a 240lbs. rider and used .47 in front and 11 in the back. WOW! It is like riding a whole new machine.
Glad I tore into the project as the forks were full of mucus and all the rear bearings and bushings were gone. Pivot Works makes some good stuff.



Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Fingers

Posted January 18, 2006 - 05:12 AM

#5

Snaggle. No need for special tools to change the fork/shock springs and fork oil. You need the .47 front and 11 rear. This combo seems the most recommended for over 200 lb riders. I have it and am happy. Got mine from ThumperTalk. Got the oil (2.5W) from Amsoil.

  • snaggleXR650

Posted January 18, 2006 - 05:29 AM

#6

Thanks Fingers, however, I really need to get into the swingarm linkage bearings too, and the steering head bearings. I've heard about some people that have rust in the forks, so I might have to do a full disassemble/cleaning on the fork internals.

Snaggle. No need for special tools to change the fork/shock springs and fork oil. You need the .47 front and 11 rear. This combo seems the most recommended for over 200 lb riders. I have it and am happy. Got mine from ThumperTalk. Got the oil (2.5W) from Amsoil.



  • AzMtnThumper

Posted January 18, 2006 - 02:10 PM

#7

Fork disassembly isn't too bad with the factory manual. Bruce's site has instructions on tool fabrication for fork disassembly and the pig pen has a couple of ideas for tools for the swingarm (I was able to get the checker auto special to work). I used the Yamaha water proof grease (aluminum based (I think)..even their grease is blue!) for steering stem, linkage and swingarm. The previous owner of my bike had Race Tech do the suspension so I was glad no "whale snot" was present in my forks and internals were rust free :thumbsup: . I did have hell getting the swingarm pivot bolt out (lots of penetrating oil). The last time I replaced the fork oil I went Bruce's reccomendation of the 2.5 wt Spectro Oil. Props to Bruce and Eric for the great resources. :bonk:

  • strippedthread1

Posted January 18, 2006 - 05:19 PM

#8

My philisophy is do it right or do it twice. I recommend you get the service manual and understand exactly what it is telling you. Changing the fork springs and oil, as well as, the rear shock spring doesn't require any special tools. However, you need some special tools to fully disassemble the forks and remove the swingarm, correctly. The Pig Pen has good advice to make your own tools or if you don't have the shop to make your own tools and for the cost of about 2 hrs. labor time you can buy the tools and have them forever.
As far as replacing the bearings in the linkage or swingarm, you can use the hammer method(bad idea) or for about $100 buy a 12 ton press from Northern. The job is so much easier and satisfying with the right tools.

The only other special tool you will need is a torque wrench. I've been riding motorcycles(street and dirt) for over 27 years and the most prized tools I own are my torque wrenches.

Good luck, when you are all done, it will be an awesome experience on the first set of whoops you hit at 50mph.





Related Content

Reviews

Honda XR650L 2017 by Chris.GVS


Honda XR650L 2017
  • - - - - -
  • 0 reviews
Forums
Photo

2015 XR650L Squeaking noise by Crayjay


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Honda   XR600/650
  • 3 replies
Forums
Photo

Post Apocalypse, ThumperTalk style! by Justin Pearson


Dirt Bike   General Dirt Bike Forums   General Dirt Bike Discussion
  • Hot  35 replies
Forums
Photo

93 xr650l Restoration Project by Zigster


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Honda   XR600/650
  • 17 replies
Forums
Photo
Washington

Cle Elum Sunday 5/29: Looking for dual sport tips by TigerTanker


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Regional Discussion   Northwest
  • Hot  32 replies
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.