Rear wheel adjustment problem


12 replies to this topic
  • Ramcc4x4

Posted December 04, 2005 - 06:39 AM

#1

Yesterday I installed my new X-ring chain and sprockets. When I was turning the wheel adjustment bolts in (to make the rear wheel forward) the threads became very tight. I ended up rounding off the 10mm bolt. I ordered replacement bolts online last night but I am wondering why they became tight all of a sudden. It took a lot of force to turn them in and I have never experienced that in the two + years of owning the bike.


Any ideas why this happened?

Do the bolts just thread into the swingarm? Anyone ever had them out or had to replace them?

  • frankstr

Posted December 04, 2005 - 07:47 AM

#2

Hopefully you can get the bolts out from being siezed up..
Get the bolts out, run the proper tap and clean the threads out and use never sieze on the bolts when installing them,plenty of it...
I drilled a 1/8" hole in the swing arm in front of the welds on each side on the bottom side due to the fact water gets in there and adds to the problem,
When i installed my adjusting bolts with neversieze i had water come out the bolt holes which led me to drilling the holes, and more water came out..
Hope this helps,if your threads get chewed up to bad you'll have to have a helicoil installed....Good luck....... :applause: :ride:

  • mtrhd101

Posted December 04, 2005 - 10:43 AM

#3

Yeah, mine were the same way.. You should have used some penetrating oil and work them back and forth very slowly, they will eventually come out.. Then buff the threads with a wire wheel and if they aren't too damaged Anti-seize them and reinstall, thats what I did.. Not a bad idea to chase the swingarm threads with a bottom tap either then wash the threads out with a shot of penetrating oil and anti-seize all... Problem solved..

  • TimBrp

Posted December 04, 2005 - 03:06 PM

#4

Another great use for WD-40. Those bolts freeze or seize in there after time. Remember theres a good amount of pressure on those threads at all times. I squirt mine down with WD-40 after each ride and have had no problems yet with 2500 miles logged.

  • XR4DEZ

Posted December 04, 2005 - 04:44 PM

#5

Never seize works real well,I also change the bolts once a season. Had to fix a friend's bike once that seized and that was a pain, I drilled it out starting with an 1/8" bit and stepping up untill the bolt had about a 1/4" hole in the center. Then I took a punch and hit the bolt down from the top toward the center, this gave me something to grab onto with some needlenose pliers and it turned right out, LUCKY. This is not a fun project and don't rush it or get the hole drilled off center.

  • mtrhd101

Posted December 04, 2005 - 11:14 PM

#6

Another great use for WD-40. Those bolts freeze or seize in there after time. Remember theres a good amount of pressure on those threads at all times. I squirt mine down with WD-40 after each ride and have had no problems yet with 2500 miles logged.

I'm not sure why you think those adjuster bolts have pressure on them.. Unless you have a loose axle flopping around and didn't tighten the jam nuts.. The only pressure I see is exerted by the jam nut on the bolt threads...

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  • TimBrp

Posted December 05, 2005 - 04:34 AM

#7

Everytime you whack the gas there is tension on that axle and adjuster setup, irregardless of the whole system being torqued down.

  • oldturtle

Posted December 05, 2005 - 08:23 AM

#8

Everytime you whack the gas there is tension on that axle and adjuster setup, irregardless of the whole system being torqued down.

You are sure right on that Tim. Once I lost a left chain adjust bolt out on the trail on old Yamaha. No matter how tightly I tightened the axle I could not get the axle to stay in position. So I had to swap the right side adjuster to the left, chain side, and then jammed a piece of wood for a spacer in place of right side adjuster, and then tightened up axle. Looked strange but I did make it out of the woods. :applause:
Steel bolt in steel threads needs locktite. Steel bolt in aluminum threads needs antisieze.

  • mtrhd101

Posted December 05, 2005 - 06:34 PM

#9

You are sure right on that Tim. Once I lost a left chain adjust bolt out on the trail on old Yamaha. No matter how tightly I tightened the axle I could not get the axle to stay in position. So I had to swap the right side adjuster to the left, chain side, and then jammed a piece of wood for a spacer in place of right side adjuster, and then tightened up axle. Looked strange but I did make it out of the woods. :applause:
Steel bolt in steel threads needs locktite. Steel bolt in aluminum threads needs antisieze.

But the tension is on the part of the bolt extending out of the swingarm thru the jam nut, it can't pull against the tentioner, just push.. It is pushing against the bolt and jam nut, not the threads in the swingarm.. Before it would be pushing on the swingarm threads the jam nut would have to be loose.. And thats not much pressure on a 1" long grade 8 bolt being pushed straight, not from an angle..

  • J_Daniels

Posted December 05, 2005 - 07:00 PM

#10

But the tension is on the part of the bolt extending out of the swingarm thru the jam nut, it can't pull against the tentioner, just push.. It is pushing against the bolt and jam nut, not the threads in the swingarm.. Before it would be pushing on the swingarm threads the jam nut would have to be loose.. And thats not much pressure on a 1" long grade 8 bolt being pushed straight, not from an angle..

Yah, I see your point, but the real reason this bolt gets stuck is thru electrolesis (sp?). The steel bolt corrodes against the aluminum swingarm material. This is the main reason why you should always anti-sieze spark plugs in an aluminum head; they can quickly corrode in for the same reason.

  • mtrhd101

Posted December 05, 2005 - 11:55 PM

#11

Thats true, its the whole dis-similar metal thing, and the dirt/moisture accelerating the process..

  • Ramcc4x4

Posted December 22, 2005 - 06:43 AM

#12

I was able to get the left side bolt out but the right side broke. There is approximately 3/4" sticking out. I thought if I used 2 nuts I would be able to back the threaded bolt out that way but the bottom nut actually forced the top nut off stripping the threads in the process. I was considering putting the rear wheel on and taking it to the muffler shop and have them tack weld the nut on the stud. That seems to be my last option prior to drilling it out and using a Helicoil.

  • HOOLPE

Posted December 22, 2005 - 07:00 AM

#13

I had a similar situation only the heads of both bolts snapped off. The threads were still clean and I was able to thread a nut on so I found some hexagonal nuts there about an inch long that came off of an old vw head and they work fine.





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