Aluminum rear sprocket XR650R


27 replies to this topic
  • mtrhd101

Posted November 27, 2005 - 06:29 AM

#1

I dont know what some of you guys think is wrong with Aluminum rear sprockets and clip type masters on the 650R.. I have run Renthals and clip type masters with the non-oring Renthal gold chain for years with no problems at all.. Before the BRP I rode CR 500's.. Ran the same thing on those with no problems, and if you think the BRP has some kind of destructive power on the rear sprocket you haven't ridden very many fast dirt bikes.. A tricked out CR 500 would leave the 650R for dead and dish out far more torture on a rear sprocket.. If it survived on one of those it will survive on anything..:applause:

  • mjlang

Posted November 27, 2005 - 09:06 AM

#2

One guy's opinion...

I never use aluminium sprockets. They are nowhere near as strong as steel and the weight difference is not that great. If you live in a Motocross world, yes there is a difference since they are so light to start with. If you are worried about weight, don't buy a BRP but, if you already have it, buy an Iron Man rear sprocket. It's almost the same weight as aluminium and it will be the last sprocket you'll ever buy. I have over 7K miles on one and have swapped out the stock sprocket for for an Iron Man Sprocket on the 650R.

Honda makes a REALLY big deal outa those DID chains. Bruce Ogilvie (Honda Baja Race team manager) specifically talks about it in his race prep recommendations. If it wasn't important, I don't think he would mention it. I'm of the opinion that if Honda can win so many races using the staked DID chain, it must work OK. The flip side of this argument is my KTM 525 makes more horsepower but uses a standard chain.... hmmm

  • rmhrc630

Posted November 27, 2005 - 01:04 PM

#3

One guy's opinion...

I never use aluminium sprockets. They are nowhere near as strong as steel and the weight difference is not that great.



umm thw weight difference is enormous!!!!

all that weight spinning round adds to poor handling.

I use renthals - but I dont ride manys kms per year so they dont wear out.

I think if you ride a lot of kms per year then possibly the increased poor handling versus durability is may be just worthwhile.

Basically anywhere weight can be removed from the pig, it should be.

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted November 27, 2005 - 01:06 PM

#4

The Honda has more low end torque than any tricked out CR500 ever dreamed about. I have a KX500 and it doesn't have the low end torque that my XR650 has. And I don't believe my 525 has the same torque either. Nothing can take the place of displacement.

Don't get me wrong I think small bores are a lot of fun but the differences are obvious.

I use steel sprockets on my XR and DID oring chains. I use the same thing on my KX500. They both eat aluminum sprockets for breakfast. My next sprocket for my 525 will be steel. It has gone through 2 aluminum sprockets. It is almost finished with it's present sprocket. It will be steel and DID from now on.

  • big t

Posted November 27, 2005 - 05:07 PM

#5

I only run steel sprockets too. I weigh 270lbs so the weight of a steel sprocket is not a big deal and steel does last longer. When the aluminum one wears out on my 450 I will go to steel on it also.

  • J_Daniels

Posted November 27, 2005 - 06:13 PM

#6

Important to note here that the quality of the sprocket is not determined so much by whether it is steel or aluminum, but by the hardness of the material, usually dictated by price. I have had decent results using Renthal aluminums on several of my bikes, and have had Sunstar steels that wore like cheese. All things similar, steel is certainly the best choice for the Pig, but make sure to spend the $$ and buy a good one; extra ditto for the chain- breakage can mean case damage!

  • mtrhd101

Posted November 28, 2005 - 05:57 AM

#7

Yes the XR650 has more torque, naturally it will, add 150 more cc's make it a 4 stroke and lots more crank/flywheel weight and you will have more torque.. But that doesn't mean more power.. Especially when your comparing 2 and 4 strokes.. The CR 500 has explosive power.. If you want to see who is putting more power to the ground line them up in a drag race.. By, By 650... The 650 has broad power from idle to top, it's more trackable and better for most riding.. But the 500 explodes, dishing out the power in a big abrupt way that is hard on a drivetrain.. I also like to save all the unsprung weight I can and you are taking weight right off the drive, ditto for the non-oring chain, it transfers power much better, more efficient.. And you do you have to buy quality stuff.. You can buy a cheaper steel sprocket and it will eat it much faster than a quality aluminum one.. I dont ride 25K miles a year on a BRP so the wear out factor isn't really a factor, plus it has to do with how you maintain the bike.. If you never clean or lubricate and ride mud all the time sure it will wear out.. Give me Aluminum and a can of chain lube, melt the steel down and make a countershaft sprocket out of it.. :applause:

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted November 28, 2005 - 07:13 AM

#8

It's very true that my KX500 or your CR500 will clean the clock of the XR650 for the short run. But given enough open ground the XR650s superior top speed will chase down the big bore two strokes and pass them. It is interesting that the big bore 2 stroke 500s no longer win the Baja 1000. Even with Kawasaki's dream team gone you would think that a private sector team would be able to place on a KX500 or CR500. Where are they? As long as bike manufactures keep putting the R&D money into 4 strokes they will eventually overshadow the 2 stokes in every category. Just watch and see. 2 Strokes will still be awesome fun bikes but they will fade away.

2006 the Federal Government begins it's crack down on the 2 stroke. It's only a matter of time before they are dead here in the states. That saddens me because they truly are awesome machines to ride. :applause:

  • mtrhd101

Posted November 28, 2005 - 07:56 AM

#9

Thats true, R&D in the last few years has been a great thing for 4 strokes.. Mostly due to the EPA and stuff like that.. I'm stoked about all the new fast and reliable 4 strokes.. Use to be if you wanted to go fast you rode a 2 stroke.. And it's almost always true that the 4 strokes are more dependable than 2 strokes, I think thats why you dont see them as much in endurance races plus the factory is trying to push the new 4 strokes not the smokers.. I'm a 4 stroke fan now, but that wasn't always the case.. Maybe because I'm getting older, or because now there are good fast 4 strokes.. And I agree, 2 strokes for the most part are on the way out.. It's a shame, you haven't lived until you have flogged a good big bore 2 stroke.. :applause:

  • creeky

Posted November 28, 2005 - 08:22 AM

#10

Grab two sprockets of the same size, one steel, one aluminum, and weigh them. The weight difference is inconsequential, the wear difference is huge.

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  • Tber

Posted November 28, 2005 - 10:56 AM

#11

Grab two sprockets of the same size, one steel, one aluminum, and weigh them. The weight difference is inconsequential, the wear difference is huge.

I never noticed the wear difference. I have had aluminum rear spockets on all of my dirt and streetbikes. I have never had a problem but i also change sprockets and chains every year

  • 4Takt

Posted November 28, 2005 - 11:10 AM

#12

I'm glad this came up. I also read somewhere that you're not supposed to used clip style master links on the XRs and couldn't make sense of it. I've used them on my 490 Maico forever and never had a problem, and that bike makes much more brutal power than an XR. Been using aluminum sprockets on the Maico as well.

4Takt

  • Pig_N_CR5hundy

Posted November 28, 2005 - 12:05 PM

#13

Just used the first and last Renthal aluminum rear sprocket onmy XR650R. If 1/2lb was that critical, I'd go on a diet. I'll take the steel. Ditton on my CR500.


Chris

  • creeky

Posted November 28, 2005 - 01:24 PM

#14

I learned my lesson in '86 on my first ride in Michigan. I trashed a brand new aluminum rear sprocket and my chain on my '85 XR350 in three days and 320 miles of sand riding. Al Baker was there with his service truck and he pointed out that the entirely brainless combination of aluminum sprocket and chain lube was attracting sand and my chain and sprockets had become a self-destructing grinding machine. He sold me a new chain and steel sprocket set and told me that if I used chain lube riding in sand again that I was a total idiot. He was correct of course. That chain and sprocket set lasted for another 650 miles in the sand and plenty of trail riding around home and did not get replaced until late summer of '87. Steel is good. :applause:

  • AzMtnThumper

Posted November 28, 2005 - 06:16 PM

#15

OK fellas, what's the best way to clean an o ring or x ring chain?? The manual says to wipe the side plates with a dry cloth (p130). I've been using some diluted simple green and an old toothbrush. What's the best lube? Should it even be lubed? I been using WD40 then a little chain wax after washing the bike. I'm begining to think that I'll drop the wax all together and just give a bit of WD40. Does the WD40 penetrate past the o or x rings and damage the lubricant sealed within the rollers? :applause:

  • creeky

Posted November 28, 2005 - 06:26 PM

#16

Since I've been using WD-40 and nothing else on my O and X ring chains (since late 80s), the chains just don't get that crappy since there is nothing for the crap to stick to. After a nasty ride, I just hose the chain off good (sometimes using a stiff bristle brush to scrub a little) and shoot on another large splatter of WD. My chains last far longer this way than when I used to use chain lube.

  • thumpasaurus

Posted November 28, 2005 - 06:29 PM

#17

...I'm begining to think that I'll drop the wax all together and just give a bit of WD40. Does the WD40 penetrate past the o or x rings and damage the lubricant sealed within the rollers? :applause:


I just ordered a new chain/sprockets today.. (DID xring) and am planning to lay off the WD40. I normally use WD40 exlcusively for my dirtbike chains, but all the talk of it sneaking past the orings and dissoving the grease has gotten to me. I have a couple cans of "dupont performance teflon lube" that I'm going to go with and plain old kerosene rag and brush to clean it with.. By this time next year I'll be able to tell you if there's anything to the WD40 bashing.

  • wr450fyamaha

Posted November 28, 2005 - 06:41 PM

#18

I'm glad this came up. I also read somewhere that you're not supposed to used clip style master links on the XRs and couldn't make sense of it. I've used them on my 490 Maico forever and never had a problem, and that bike makes much more brutal power than an XR. Been using aluminum sprockets on the Maico as well.

4Takt



ive been running a clip for about 2k miles.....not a problem yet.

  • J_Daniels

Posted November 28, 2005 - 08:08 PM

#19

I have always shot my o-ring chains with WD-40 to keep the surface rust at bay after washing. Never heard of it sneaking past the o-rings into the grease, but the idea makes sense. Maybe I'll lay off the stuff altogether; it's really just for cosmetics.

  • Pig_N_CR5hundy

Posted November 29, 2005 - 01:38 PM

#20

I have found that by the time the WD-40 gets behind the o/x rings and gets rid of the grease, my chain is on it's last limb anyhow. Hell, I only get about 650-800 miles out of a chain regardless of whether or not it is on the 500 or 650. I'll use the WD-40, save the sprocket wear, and replace my chain as needed.


Chris





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