07 Wr 450


85 replies to this topic
  • stonewall

Posted February 28, 2006 - 05:57 PM

#61

Stefan Merriman will be riding a factory, aluminum framed, WR450 in World Enduro this year. I'd say it's pretty safe to say that aluminum is in our future, like it or not.

  • clark4131

Posted February 28, 2006 - 06:07 PM

#62

Stefan Merriman will be riding a factory, aluminum framed, WR450 in World Enduro this year. I'd say it's pretty safe to say that aluminum is in our future, like it or not.


Source?...SC

  • obermeyer

Posted February 28, 2006 - 06:35 PM

#63

Why would you need to remove the carb for jetting anyway. My 06 YZ jets can be removed via the bolt in the bottom of the carb.

I really don't see yamaha investing in the aluminum frame for the WR. My guess is that it will stay steel.

  • 00YZ426FMRCD

Posted February 28, 2006 - 07:01 PM

#64

In a few years I may get back to a balanced life style and ride once a month like most TTer's. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :bonk:


Indy - My .02 - Screw the balanced lifestyle and ride as much as you can! :bonk:

  • Beef

Posted February 28, 2006 - 07:09 PM

#65

I really could care less about the aluminum frame, I'm looking for the fuel injection. I know first model year injection can be hit and miss, but Yamaha has been doing FI on their street bikes for quite a while now, and have had FI on the Raptor for a year now, and I haven't heard any major complaints. It would be so nice to get rid of jetting problems, get rid of AIS...and everything else that yamaha has had to do to these bikes in order to make them 50-state. Closed loop FI would/could fix all of that! :thumbsup:

  • stonewall

Posted February 28, 2006 - 07:16 PM

#66

Source?...SC



Pretty much common knowledge, it's been in all the rags, no special source needed.

Australian Stefan Merriman has one simple goal in 2006 - to win the Enduro 2 World Championship. Armed with a special aluminium framed Yamaha WR450F the four-time world champion will call upon his years of experience as he competes in what will undoubtedly be his toughest world championship season to date.

Here's a link if you need official confirmation. The aluminum frame is coming soon.

http://www.yamaharac...o2/merriman.asp

  • WR450F_RDR

Posted February 28, 2006 - 07:31 PM

#67

Sorry folks but if you havent ridden an aluminum framed YZ you dont know what your missing. This bike is great in the woods with the exception of needing lower gearing or a better rider. The suspension, the geometry of the bike and the lower center of gravity are major pluses. If they come out with an aluminum framed WR I plan on getting one.

  • WR_Dave

Posted February 28, 2006 - 07:55 PM

#68

My dealer said that he would bet on EFI before Aluminum frames. Japan is going to build what sells,The rest of us will have to take the 450 engine and drop by BBR for the custom chrome moly trick frame. WR Dave

  • clark4131

Posted February 28, 2006 - 09:35 PM

#69

Pretty much common knowledge, it's been in all the rags, no special source needed...Here's a link if you need official confirmation. The aluminum frame is coming soon

If I believed everything someone told me without verifying its accuracy, I'd be riding a Honda, now wouldn't I?:thumbsup:...SC

  • Lowedog

Posted February 28, 2006 - 11:01 PM

#70

All this talk about aluminum frames being inferior to steel for offroad cracks me up. 99.9% of us can't ride hard enough for flex in the frame to be an issue! The aluminum frame for a dirt bike is far superior to steel. It's lighter, easier to manufacture, and the geometry is way better. The YZ frame is almost entirely made of cast components. Castings are stronger than steel tubing! Flex can and will be engineered into the frame for those who will use it. There is a reason that Yamaha went aluminum on the YZ and it wasn't to sell bikes. They would sell them anyway. Anyone who rides the 06 YZ450 raves about how light it feels. It actually weighs about the same as last years bike. The weight is down low. That's what we need for the WR! If Yamaha builds an aluminum framed WR based on the YZ450 for 2007 they will have my money. :thumbsup:

As for a slipper clutch standard, some of us ride 4 strokes because of the engine breaking.

-Lowedog

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  • imdickie

Posted March 01, 2006 - 12:38 AM

#71

My brother has a brand new YZF250 that I rode last weekend and had a chance to compare my 2005 WR450. I can completely tell the difference in the stiffness of the frames. FWIW I would love an Al frame track bike because of the stiffness and a ChroMo frame for long rides. I was much more tired from riding a short ride on my brother's bike than I was after a rather long ride on my WR. Different riding styles require different bikes. I won't forego my 2005 for an Al frame one but I do see the beauty in EFI.

Also, the new frame is physically lighter than the ChroMo frame but the bike itself will be heavier. When the take the oil out of the frame that have to add parts for cooling and distribution. I believe the YZ Al is 1.1lbs heavier than it's ChroMo counterpart. The weight won't make that big of a difference. What changes the bike is the stiffness of the frame and the lower CG. You just have to consider what kind of rider you are and go with it.

  • bluebike1999

Posted March 01, 2006 - 03:35 AM

#72

bring on the following

aluminIum frame
525 cc engine capacity
6 speed
fuel injected
and dont give up on 2wd either, they will become common.

  • Beef

Posted March 01, 2006 - 07:43 AM

#73

I am planning on buying a WR this spring, but would be willing to wait until the fall if there was better than a 50% chance of getting fuel injection...does anyone have an inside track or an idea what the chances are?

  • jwriott

Posted March 01, 2006 - 08:35 AM

#74

All this talk about aluminum frames being inferior to steel for offroad cracks me up. 99.9% of us can't ride hard enough for flex in the frame to be an issue! The aluminum frame for a dirt bike is far superior to steel. It's lighter, easier to manufacture, and the geometry is way better. The YZ frame is almost entirely made of cast components. Castings are stronger than steel tubing! Flex can and will be engineered into the frame for those who will use it. There is a reason that Yamaha went aluminum on the YZ and it wasn't to sell bikes. They would sell them anyway. Anyone who rides the 06 YZ450 raves about how light it feels. It actually weighs about the same as last years bike. The weight is down low. That's what we need for the WR! If Yamaha builds an aluminum framed WR based on the YZ450 for 2007 they will have my money. :thumbsup:

As for a slipper clutch standard, some of us ride 4 strokes because of the engine breaking.

-Lowedog


I'll give you cost and ease of manufacture with the aluminum castings.

Just how do you think the geometry is better because it's made out of aluminum? The geometry is dictated by the design, not the material.

Aluminum castings are NOT stronger than steel tubing.

Many of us don't like engine braking, let alone "engine breaking".

Why can't Yamaha make an MXC version of the YZ? 18" rear wheel, lighting coil, no lights, SA and a 6-speed?

My next new off road bike will probably be a YZ450 with a Rekluse clutch.

  • lipskid

Posted March 01, 2006 - 11:04 AM

#75

99.9% of us can't ride hard enough for flex in the frame to be an issue!

:thumbsup:

Wow, if you are breaking frames on a WR, maybe you need something thats not so soft and heavy. I can see where a (very)few people might put enough hard miles on a bike that metal fatigue might be a real issue, and if you're just plain riding that hard, hats off to you. My guess is Yamaha will probably try to build a bike for us humans. I think my Aluminum framed YZ is incredible, and light years ahead of my '03WR(but then so is an '06WR, I know). I do see where carb access with the battery tray where it is will be a pain.

I vote no thanks on the FI. Where I live it's up hill or down hill where ever I go. Once dialed, both my bikes run well enough pretty much where ever i go. Sure, it blubbers a bit when I go up high, and I might need a bigger main for some desert races, but I'm rarely, if ever, more than a turn of the screw or maybe a main jet away from decent jetting. Could it be better? Probably, but it's still better than I am. What would I rather have to buy, :bonk: a new main jet, or a LAPTOP! I'd rather not pay extra for FI and a new lap top, so some folks don't have to change a jet now and then. But thats me. And like it or not, I'll probably have to by the time I buy a new bike.

Grease zerks would be nice.

I like the 5spd on the YZ just fine, but a closer ratio 6spd with the same spread on the WR would be sweet.

Indy, have you ridden a new YZ? No need for rubber mounting any more. :thumbsup:

Yeah, an XC version in blue would be sweet, but after owning an '06 YZ for a while, they could keep the e-start and 6spd. Don't need them. I'm not putting a rekluse on this one either. Its that good. :bonk: (but I don't go dragging this bike up through the rocks either, that's why I kept the WR)

I would like to see different handlebar bends and springs available as options. Why pay for all that cool aluminum and ti, if most people are going to change them anyway. Besides, a lot of dealers are so fond of charging for "set up". Then let them set 'em up!

  • Lowedog

Posted March 02, 2006 - 06:43 AM

#76

I'll give you cost and ease of manufacture with the aluminum castings.

Just how do you think the geometry is better because it's made out of aluminum? The geometry is dictated by the design, not the material.

Aluminum castings are NOT stronger than steel tubing.

Many of us don't like engine braking, let alone "engine breaking".

Why can't Yamaha make an MXC version of the YZ? 18" rear wheel, lighting coil, no lights, SA and a 6-speed?

My next new off road bike will probably be a YZ450 with a Rekluse clutch.



Geometry is better because of ease of manufacturing. :bonk:

Aluminum castings are stronger than steel tubing. Aluminum is far superior for making lighter...stronger. If not Boeing would be making their planes out of steel tubing.

I would love to see Yamaha make an MXC version but I don't think it will happen.

As for getting rid of engine breaking, that's what the aftermarket is for.



imdickie, that stiffness your feeling on your bro's YZ. That's called MX suspension. Take a YZ and smooth out the suspension for offroad and you will be amazed at how much better his bike is for offroad than a WR! :thumbsup:


:thumbsup: Lowedog

  • bg10459

Posted March 02, 2006 - 08:03 AM

#77

Geometry is better because of ease of manufacturing.

:thumbsup: Huh? Please explain.

Cast aluminum, in general, is not stronger than steel, but, because they can engineer the castings such that they put material where it adds strength and remove it where it has no effect, it can be stronger... and lighter. Much like a truss vs. a beam.

  • imdickie

Posted March 02, 2006 - 09:18 AM

#78

imdickie, that stiffness your feeling on your bro's YZ. That's called MX suspension. Take a YZ and smooth out the suspension for offroad and you will be amazed at how much better his bike is for offroad than a WR! :thumbsup:


I respectfully disagree. I have been riding for years and can tell suspensions apart. My WR has a Precision Concepts suspension set up for an A desert rider @ 200lbs - 240lbs so it is perfect for me. The YZ was a stock suspension which is typically set up for a 160lb rider. I really felt the difference in the geometry of the frame, lower CG and less flex. With my wieght and riding style I really stress suspensions and frames. I agree that a YZ can be made into a fine off road bike but for me I am much more tired after riding a converted MX bike than a true off road bike. I know the WR is a pig in a blue dress but it actually makes me a better rider. I have to plot my lines earlier and stick to them. I can't flick my way out of a bad spot like I used to with my YZ. Don't get me wrong I love my YZ and still have it, but she is my track bike now.

  • Lowedog

Posted March 02, 2006 - 11:28 AM

#79

:bonk: Huh? Please explain.

Cast aluminum, in general, is not stronger than steel, but, because they can engineer the castings such that they put material where it adds strength and remove it where it has no effect, it can be stronger... and lighter. Much like a truss vs. a beam.



I think you just explained it yourself. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: That's exactly what I mean by ease of manufacturing. The superior geometry of the cast part is much easier to achieve over bending tubing. And it's lighter!

imdickie, didn't mean to disrespect you at all. But you have to agree even a bike set up for MX/SX for a 160 lb rider has much harsher suspension than a bike set up for offroad for a 200 lb rider. Generally your not going to get a set up that will cover the differance between 200 - 240 lbs. That is a big differance.

I have 2 friends that ride 2005 YZ 250 2 strokes. Both ride mostly offroad. One guy had his suspension tuned for his offroad riding stlye the other is stock. you ride both those bikes on the same section and the bike with custom suspension is a dream to ride and the stock bike is very harsh. And I weigh 20 lbs more than the custom tuned bikes owner. His bike makes my WR feel like a pig! I could ride his bike all day and be half as tired as I am on my WR. And I love my WR!. The stock YZ tires me out in a heartbeat.

-Lowedog

  • bg10459

Posted March 02, 2006 - 11:41 AM

#80

I think you just explained it yourself. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: That's exactly what I mean by ease of manufacturing. The superior geometry of the cast part is much easier to achieve over bending tubing. And it's lighter!

Well, I see your inference, but I don't think it's such a direct relationship. The superior geometry comes from the engineered design and the ease of manufacturing, once the mold is produced, comes from the fact that it is cast. The casting process, in and of itself, does not produce a superior design.




 
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