Chain Maintenance


17 replies to this topic
  • mmbasa

Posted November 16, 2005 - 06:02 PM

#1

What are you guys doing to keep your chain in good shape. Do you just scrub it with a brush or do you pull it off the bike to clean. This is for a non O-ring chain. If you pull it off, how often do you replace the clip and what do you clean it in? Thanks

  • flintlock28

Posted November 16, 2005 - 07:25 PM

#2

With a non-O ring chain, it's probably o.k. to use high pressure water on the chain while it's on the bike to blast off any dirt, grit, etc. You could then use wd-40 and spray the chain to displace any water. Let it sit for awhile and than use a good chain lube like Maxima Synthetic chain guard to properly lube it. If it really gets dirty, than you can always do the time-tested method of removing the chain, and soaking it in Kerosene while you scrub it with a nylon brush, followed up by lubing it.

If you were using an "o" ring chain, than DON'T ever use high pressure water on the chain, unless you are several feet from the chain (high pressure water can blow out the lube between the "o" rings resulting in destroying the long term life of the chain)
I replaced my stock chain with a Regina "o" ring model, and I usually use hose water and simple green to wash off the chain, followed by Maxima Synthetic Chain guard.

  • CV4

Posted November 17, 2005 - 07:13 AM

#3

I remove my chain after every ride and soak it in kerosene (non o-ring only). When I get time I go over it with an old toothbrush, blow it off with compressed air, then lube it. I've never had to replace the clip but I always keep a spare master link on hand just in case.

  • Butta

Posted November 17, 2005 - 07:40 AM

#4

What are you guys doing to keep your chain in good shape. Do you just scrub it with a brush or do you pull it off the bike to clean. This is for a non O-ring chain. If you pull it off, how often do you replace the clip and what do you clean it in? Thanks


I agree with the other guys....soak it in kerosene when you pull it off the bike, then allow it to dry completely and lube it up.

One thing I've wondered, though, the manual says to use 30W motor oil for the lube....what if you soaked it in Slick 50 (or something comparable)? It's supposed to molecularly bond to the metal so you always have lubrication.....what better place than a chain to take advantage of that property???

Anyone have any thoughts on that? This, of course, whould be for a non O ring chain.....

  • curtains23

Posted November 17, 2005 - 07:56 AM

#5

For a non o ring the age old method wash in kerosine (parafin) over here with a good firm brush and wipe with a clean cloth, soak over night in good quality used engine oil (motul v300) hang up for 2 hours and you will see what dirt has been left in it, re soak and do the same as much as time before your next ride will allow, i used steel sprockets which will take alot of punishment but are much heavier, the chain lube you sugested is one of the best and I use it on my o ring, hope this helps.
Best wishes
Curtains23

  • speddie3

Posted November 17, 2005 - 08:04 AM

#6

this was in the General forum,

http://www.thumperta...05&parentpage=4

and I clean mine off with solvent and then re-lube with some PJ1 stuff, its pretty gooey and messy though.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 17, 2005 - 08:37 AM

#7

One thing I've wondered, though, the manual says to use 30W motor oil for the lube....what if you soaked it in Slick 50 (or something comparable)? It's supposed to molecularly bond to the metal so you always have lubrication.....what better place than a chain to take advantage of that property???

Anyone have any thoughts on that? This, of course, whould be for a non O ring chain.....

Motor oil actually does an excellent job of lubing a roller chain. Chains that spend their entire careers in an oil bath, such as the cam chains in many cars, and motorcycle primary chains, last a very long time because they are always reasonably clean, and are constantly lubed. The obvious problem with oil for lubing an external chain is that it won't stay put, which not only makes a mess, it leaves your chain with nothing.

I run sealed chains exclusively, but if I used a non-sealed chain, I would probably favor using a "dry" moly based lube, at least as a base for another lubricant. Moly, like other boundary lubricants, works its way into the pores in the surface of the bearings and pins, and is, if used often enough, capable of lubing without oil or grease. I would rather add a good, non-tacky chain lube on top of that, though. By using an oil film lube over a base of moly, or an oil film lube with a high moly content, you'd be getting the best protection available, it seems to me.

Slick 50, if I remember correctly, is a Teflon bearing product. Teflon could not be expected to match the performance of moly compounds.

  • CV4

Posted November 17, 2005 - 09:00 AM

#8

but if I used a non-sealed chain, I would probably favor using a "dry" moly based lube, at least as a base for another lubricant. Moly, like other boundary lubricants, works its way into the pores in the surface of the bearings and pins, and is, if used often enough, capable of lubing without oil or grease.



I agree. I started using Liquid Performance chain lube this year and have definitely seen a difference. It is a moly based lube that dries quickly and does not attract dirt.

The sticky, gooey chain lubes work well as a lubricant but attract so much dirt and dust. After riding with these types of lube you end up with the equivalent of a very fine lapping compound inside of the chain on the pins and rollers.

  • DigilubeJay

Posted November 17, 2005 - 10:18 AM

#9

If you use a dry-film lubricant, you can skip the kerosene soak. The chain won't need that any more. There is no gooey sticky crap to clean off when you use dry-film.

Gray, if you add a petroleum to a dry-film lube, you are goiong back to the dirt collection scheme that old school lubes create. There is absolutely NO need for additional petroleum of parrafin lubricants when you use a dry-film.
But I guess if you have become accustomed to having the headache of a hard-to-clean chain...then add oil and make a mess. :ride:

...The obvious problem with oil for lubing an external chain is that it won't stay put, which not only makes a mess, it leaves your chain with nothing.

Why would you advise adding oil to a dry-film when you recognize that oil is a problem? :applause:


For maintenance try this:
http://www.best-moto...rocket_tips.htm

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  • ironbird456

Posted November 17, 2005 - 10:50 AM

#10

You people have way to much time on your hands. There is no way in the world I would ever pull my chain off my bike to wash it much less do anything other than a spray off and lube.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 17, 2005 - 10:50 AM

#11

Why would you advise adding oil to a dry-film when you recognize that oil is a problem?

Because an oil film, whether in the form of oil suspended in a grease formula, or in a fluid form, is still superior to a dry moly film on its own. In combination, the two are unbeatable.

You showed up faster than I thought you would.

  • eazrider

Posted November 17, 2005 - 11:31 AM

#12

I have a vintage bike I use a non-"0"ring chain on. I pull it off, soak/swish it around in some type of solvent (kerosene, or dare I say it, gasoline) wire brushing is seldom but sometimes needed. I hang it up and let it drip dry. A thorough soaking with Maxima Chain Wax and it's good to go for a day of Moto-X.. Not sure if I would be so thorough if I was using this type of chain on my 450. I use a Regina "O" ring , and mantainence consists of checking/adjusting every third-fourth ride, and a little WD-40 at the same time. Most carefree chain I've ever had......

  • grayracer513

Posted November 17, 2005 - 11:52 AM

#13

Try Maxima's Synthetic Chain Guard. Lubes better than the wax, stays on better, and is very nearly as dry after it "sets up". :applause:

  • CV4

Posted November 17, 2005 - 12:37 PM

#14

If you use a dry-film lubricant, you can skip the kerosene soak. The chain won't need that any more. There is no gooey sticky crap to clean off when you use dry-film.



You are correct to a point however, after a day in the dirt the chain will still get some dust inside of it. I still clean the chain in kerosene after every ride as I want it to be as clean as possible. The dry film type lubes do make it much quicker and easier to clean.

  • DigilubeJay

Posted November 17, 2005 - 04:33 PM

#15

Because an oil film, whether in the form of oil suspended in a grease formula, or in a fluid form, is still superior to a dry moly film on its own. In combination, the two are unbeatable.

You showed up faster than I thought you would.

I show up because you tend to give your opinion about chain and sprocket maintenance, and it is quite apparent you are lacking in these area's. Not fair to kids for them to think your advise is credible with some of the advise you have given in the past concerning these areas.

For example...I would like for you to go indepth and explain to us why you claim a fluid film is superior to a moly based fry-film.

And just to save time, I will state that you have no idea what you are talking about. But I am interested on what your opinion is.

And of course, no matter what you say, or what I reply, you will have your entarage chiming in on how you are the one to ask on any subject, and to argue with you only hurts my credibility.
:applause:
Actually, I think you enter in to each and every thread involving chains just so you can show your superiority on the subject. And having your clown posse chime in helps your ego.

On this issue...you are lacking, Sir.
But...if we keep this up, you just may learn something. Doubtful you will accept anything I have to offer...but there is that saying about old dogs...

Are you as sharp at hooking up USB cables?

  • 642MX

Posted November 17, 2005 - 05:00 PM

#16

I show up because you tend to give your opinion about chain and sprocket maintenance, and it is quite apparent you are lacking in these area's. Not fair to kids for them to think your advise is credible with some of the advise you have given in the past concerning these areas.

For example...I would like for you to go indepth and explain to us why you claim a fluid film is superior to a moly based fry-film.

And just to save time, I will state that you have no idea what you are talking about. But I am interested on what your opinion is.

And of course, no matter what you say, or what I reply, you will have your entarage chiming in on how you are the one to ask on any subject, and to argue with you only hurts my credibility.
:applause:
Actually, I think you enter in to each and every thread involving chains just so you can show your superiority on the subject. And having your clown posse chime in helps your ego.

On this issue...you are lacking, Sir.
But...if we keep this up, you just may learn something. Doubtful you will accept anything I have to offer...but there is that saying about old dogs...

Are you as sharp at hooking up USB cables?



Wow, you really are an *********. If you knew as much about marketing as you think you know about chain lube, everybody would be using your product. I've been a store manager for 4 years at a ATV and motorcycle dealership and I've never heard of Digilube (and we are in the same state). Why is that? Do you piss off everybody that comes into contact with you?

Somebody asks a simple question about chain lube and you write a book on how much you know about metal, and lube and adjustment and how stupid everybody is. I don't even know Gray, but when he speaks, I listen, (we all listen) because he can help, without making people feel stupid. And that is what gains respect and thats why nobody respects you.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 17, 2005 - 05:04 PM

#17

And just to save time, I will state that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Well, then there's no point in my saying any more, is there?

And having your clown posse chime in helps your ego.

I'm sure the members of the posse would be interested in knowing who they are, in your esteemed opinion. The respect you show to others is truly remarkable.

...but there is that saying about old dogs...

There's another one about teaching pigs to sing, too.

Are you as sharp at hooking up USB cables?

As a current holder of an MCSE, MCP+I, CCNA, CNA, A+, and two Apple hardware certificates, I can tell you that hooking up USB cables is so simple that, given an hour or so, I could even teach you how to do it.

  • DigilubeJay

Posted November 17, 2005 - 08:22 PM

#18

Do you piss off everybody that comes into contact with you?

No, only buttwipes and clowns.

Somebody asks a simple question about chain lube and you write a book on how much you know about metal, and lube and adjustment and how stupid everybody is.

No, I go indepth to back up my assertions. Others provide mere opinion with no basis in fact, and even state as such, yet they are not to be questioned or challanged...or face the wrath of the clown posse. I suppose you have something to offer up on this topic?
You must have, with all of your extensive experience in the moto world.

I don't even know Gray, but when he speaks, I listen, (we all listen) because he can help, without making people feel stupid. And that is what gains respect and thats why nobody respects you.

Yes you do listen. And that is why I don't parse words when debating him on this issue. You are listening to opinion, and flawed opinion at that.
I guarantee he isn't replying to every thread involving chains and sprockets because his knowledge is superior and has something to offer...it is because he wants to jab at me. And he knows he can get by with it, because he has a clown posse that will back him up no matter what he offers. Even when he cannot provide ANYTHING to back up his assertions, but opinion.

And I can't help how you feel. If you feel stupid, then I would seriously take a look at why. I certainly have NOT called anyone stupid, nor have I implied it. If I go indepth on a topic, why does that mean I'm trying to make people look stupid? I'm simply offering up knowledge and experience.

I'm still waiting on gray to give us some information that backs up his last assertions on the subject, but that won't happen, because he has nothing to offer. Way too easy to crawfish when he has folks like you chimming in.
Heck, he wasted another reply doing just that...crawfishing.
No way he can back up his last assertions, and he won't even try.
Like I've stated before, there should be an "Ask Gray" board. Why even have discussions and debates?



But back on topic,
CV4...with a product like moly, the molecules are polar in nature, which means they are like magnets and will fill in all the microscopic valleys that are in the metal's surface, forming a sort of plating.
When dust comes in contact at the pin/bushing area, it will be on top of the moly that is adhered to the metal surface. And in this condition, all it takes is a brief shot of water to shove the dirt off of the treated surfaces. (or a strong burst of air for that matter)
In fact, moly is longer lasting than most any petroleum product can ever hope to be, and as such will more than likely still be protecting the metal even after a long ride. You are more likely to wash out some moly with any sort of strong solvent. And even though parrafin wax isn't very strong, it is a waste of time and energy to use that method when you use a dry-film.
You could actually comprimise the effectiveness of the dry-film if the oil isn't completely out of the friction area, since it could possibly dilute the solution when you apply it. Not to mention that it can also serve as a dirt collector, just like other oils can be. And yes, the moly will still be residing in the valleys of the surface, but oil can grab lots of dirt and a grinding paste will be created eventually. Enough grit, and nothing can withstand it's abrasion.
A good hard spray with a garden hose is far better.

I certainly hope you don't feel like I am trying to make you look stupid. It is NOT my intention.





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