Dyno numbers WR450F, anyone?


17 replies to this topic
  • OlaGB

Posted November 05, 2005 - 09:17 AM

#1

Wondering about the real stock power in my european sold WR450F 2003mod, and what some mods could do to it!

Therefor:

Gimme tha numbers! (if there is no similar thread like this posted before??)

Bike:
HP: (write about measuring at the wheel or motor)
NM:
Mods:


This would be fun to read, if there are anyone that actually has dynoed theyre bike..!

  • Tyler426

Posted November 05, 2005 - 10:47 PM

#2

I put my 01 wr426 on one of the dynos at MMI. I was only getting high 30's, so I pulled the dirty air filter off and got just past 40. My motor has never been rebuilt, and it needs to be, and the only thing done to it is the throttle stop is cut and the baffle is out of the pipe. I had an oring chain and a steel sprocket on too so that didn't help either. I was kinda disapointed, but I understand why it was low and I know what I could do to improve it.

  • OlaGB

Posted November 05, 2005 - 11:12 PM

#3

Was this wheel hp, or motor hp?

I find info from 38 to 58hp in wr450f on the internet, but it does not stand about it being wheel or motor hp, and no dyno chart to back it up..

It`s not that important, i know, but it is a fun thing to know :banghead:

  • Matty05

Posted November 06, 2005 - 01:37 PM

#4

If it is on the dyno, that'll be wheel HP.

58 HP sounds high to me, but I am guessing 45 - 50 hp.

  • new2fourstrokes

Posted November 06, 2005 - 03:01 PM

#5

my 05 WR 450 makes 49.2 rear wheel hp all mods done yosh slip on pipe..

  • Tyler426

Posted November 07, 2005 - 07:41 PM

#6

Yeah, it was at the wheel.

  • OlaGB

Posted November 07, 2005 - 09:38 PM

#7

I talked to a company here in norway yesterday, that has a MC dyno room..

They had dynoe`d two different WR450F`s (european standard bikes), and one of them made 46hk, the other made 49hk then changed to a Leo slip-on and made 52hk.. At the wheels of course.. Ha had noted 160 mj on both, but was not quite shure about it being 160 on the slip-on pull..

He also looked at a standard CRF450, and it was about the same as the standard WR450`s..


I ordered a JD kit, and FMF q pipe yesterday and are now wondering about some hotcams too.. I love having that little extra pull :banghead: Not racing anyway, so it does not affect my riding other than making the grin in my face even bigger :banghead:

  • vmxr

Posted November 08, 2005 - 06:41 AM

#8

Were all these dyno runs done with knobbies or was a treaded street tire mounted on the rear? I ask because I've been told (and I can't vouche for the expertise of the person that told me) that if you dyno with a knobbie the numbers will be lower than actual. Just curious...

  • bandit99

Posted November 08, 2005 - 12:26 PM

#9

Horse Power is a relative term. There is no actual standard for a unit of "horsepower". There are different types of dyno machines out there and they all have a different measurement of horsepower. If you want to compare HP then you need to put the two bikes on the same dyno. Dyno's are a great tool to help tune your bike and to see what gains have been made while tuning but comparing HP numbers can be misleading.

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  • Tyler426

Posted November 08, 2005 - 09:54 PM

#10

I put a street tire on for the dyno

  • hankdog

Posted November 09, 2005 - 07:27 AM

#11

Horse Power is a relative term. There is no actual standard for a unit of "horsepower".


Horsepower = torque (lb.-ft.) x rpm / 5250

That is the formula for motor horsepower...quite well defined in engineering terms. There however will be variations in measurement based on things like tires as someone has previously noted. A knobby would not transfer power to the dyno as efficiently as a street tire for example. Also there will be variations in calibration, elevation, temps, etc... I presume every dyno technician has his own preferences regarding bike setup on the dyno and these will all affect the measurement - I doubt there are any accepted industry standards for that. All that said, if you took the same bike to several dynos and set it up on each one the same way, you should get very consistant numbers if the dynos are correctly calibrated.

  • TwoBobRob

Posted November 09, 2005 - 01:29 PM

#12

2003 WR450.

Set up as supermoto (17" wheels, road tyres)

Full akropovic Ti exhaust system jetted to suit, no other mods.

49bhp at the wheel. :applause:

  • WR450_Mike

Posted December 15, 2006 - 12:09 PM

#13

Horsepower = torque (lb.-ft.) x rpm / 5250

That is the formula for motor horsepower...quite well defined in engineering terms. There however will be variations in measurement based on things like tires as someone has previously noted. A knobby would not transfer power to the dyno as efficiently as a street tire for example. Also there will be variations in calibration, elevation, temps, etc... I presume every dyno technician has his own preferences regarding bike setup on the dyno and these will all affect the measurement - I doubt there are any accepted industry standards for that. All that said, if you took the same bike to several dynos and set it up on each one the same way, you should get very consistant numbers if the dynos are correctly calibrated.


Altitude and air temperature both make for air density. Denser air (cooler and lower altitudes) equates to more HP. So if your dyno is in higher and warmer air, your indicated HP will be lower. However, most dyno computers will not only give indicated HP and torque curve sheets, but also produce corrected HP and torque curve sheets. Most all corrected numbers are corrected to a sea level altitude and 59 degrees F.

The differences in dyno's are mostly how the operator loads the dyno. How quick it loads up, and how hard they hit it. With that said, different dyno's will produce different results. But, they won't be so different that they can't be used for approximate comparisons.

As the previous poster stated, they are great for initial tuning. You would still want to check your tuning in the real world.

  • bmeador

Posted December 16, 2006 - 06:42 AM

#14

2006 wr 450, all free mods, full Leo Vince pipe. With a street tire on a dynojet dyno in a controlled enviroment. mine put out 51.2 hp at the rear wheel. had a 03 yz 450 same set up went from 45.3 before putting the pipe on and it made 49.9 after installing the pipe. In my opinion the Leo Vince pipe is the best u can buy, Yes I have tried fmf,pro circit,big gun, ect. But for the performance and NOISE u cant get a better pipe.:thumbsup:

  • TWILES

Posted December 17, 2006 - 07:12 PM

#15

The motor on the WR 450 is the same as the YFZ quad other than the exhaust cam and piston and they are getting like 45 rear wheel with a pipe, k+n filter with no lid. I'd say an uncorked WR would be about the same. It would feel like more since its 100 lbs lighter but close.

  • WR450_Mike

Posted December 19, 2006 - 05:44 PM

#16

Here is the dyno run for my bike, a 2007 WR450F with dirt tire.

Run 002 in Blue is with the AIS kit installed, but no mod to muffler or airbox.

Run 004 in Red is same as above except with FMF Q4 muffler installed.

Run 007 in Green is same as Run 004 except Power Bomb Header installed.

Posted Image

  • windaddiction

Posted December 19, 2006 - 06:28 PM

#17

I dyno'd mine in motard trim and it made 48.9 with free mods

  • sirjolly18

Posted February 04, 2013 - 01:35 PM

#18

Just had my 04 wr450f dynoed and the max Hp it said was: 53.70hp up from 49.4hp

Mods when i got the bike was:
  • the airbox was opened up.
  • Staintune slip on muffler
  • I cleaned the air filter Before the dyno, New knobbies
the bike was at stock jetting and tended to stutter alot but the mechanic said the fuel system had water in it which did not help my cause :p But after the rejet and dyno run its a great bike now. Better power delivery through the revs.

all for $250 AUS




 
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