Ready Racing Oil Filter verses Scotts


26 replies to this topic
  • grayracer513

Posted November 10, 2005 - 03:36 PM

#21

The bad info I was referring to was the statement about a removable bypass valve for cleaning and how it is a silly concept. Ready's bypass valve is not removable. Maybe you were thinking of another manufacturer?

Regarding the "trick" oil filter cover. If you can't recognize what is trick about a CNC machined billet aluminum part that is anodized black with an engraved logo, then the stock cover is definitely for you.

Well, there are, or were two copy-cat filters, one of which made quite a production about how the bypass was removable. Their "fishing lure" was that the filter (not the cover, now) was available anodized in colors. :applause: So if that's not Ready, I stand corrected on that point. But the rest of my questions remain unanswered, don't they?

But maybe you can help me with the cover thing. What is "trick" about a filter cover that does nothing but add weight, is a different color than the rest of the engine, and bears the logo of a company that thinks disposable air filters are a good idea, so that everyone can see that I took the bait? Not everything that can be CNC'ed from billet stock should be.

  • chrismxer

Posted November 10, 2005 - 04:51 PM

#22

I've never been convinced about a wire mesh filter. When I had one I was suprised at how big the holes were. It seems that the paper filter would filter finer particles, but what do I know. All I did was read the scotts info too. I don't think I have ever read about a paper filters claims. It is interesting that yamaha went away from there screen mesh filters whether it be to make more money on paper filters or that the paper filter filters out finer particles??

As far as cost goes I found a great deal on paper filters a few years ago at cycle gear for about $3.00 a filter. They were made by the same company that makes K&N filters (don't remember the name). I bought about 20 of them and it's been well over a year.

Either way scotts has an amazing reputation and I'm sure that there filter is probably the best. I don't know about ready filter but I wasn't impressed with there air filters. I found the filter to be over oiled (probably due to not wanting any law suits) and when I cleaned it the seams started to come apart. So I basically got one bad use out of it. Mabey I got a bad one?? But a few more bucks for peace of mind is sometimes worth it.

Chris.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 10, 2005 - 08:32 PM

#23

I've never been convinced about a wire mesh filter. When I had one I was suprised at how big the holes were. It seems that the paper filter would filter finer particles, but what do I know. All I did was read the scotts info too. I don't think I have ever read about a paper filters claims. It is interesting that yamaha went away from there screen mesh filters whether it be to make more money on paper filters or that the paper filter filters out finer particles??

The filter you had may well have been an OEM bronze mesh filter. As I said before, these are not that fine, and filter to only about 80 microns, allowing particles to pass that are over twice as large as those passed by the Scotts.

Yamaha moved away from these when they went to the smaller oil capacity of the '03 and later models in an effort to keep the oil cleaner longer. Paper filters are hard to compare directly to mesh. They have the drawback of flowing less freely than mesh to the extent that they bypass on most cold starts for at least a few seconds, for one thing.

Mesh filters are usually rated to a particle size "absolute". That means the the largest spherical object that will pass through the mesh is... in the case of a Scotts, it's 35 microns. Theoretically, you could have a splinter of metal 30 microns in diameter and an inch long and that would pass through, but how realistic is that?

Paper is better rated by beta numbers. In this method, a known amount of debris is pumped to the filter, and what gets through is measured. A number like 90/35 would mean it trapped 90% of all the 35 micron or larger stuff. The random arrangement of the fibers even allows the filter to produce numbers like 40/15, meaning that it caught 40% of the 15 micron particles. The trouble is that they will ususally have numbers like 96/50 as well, indicating that it will pass quite a few 50 micron particles, and will pass particles as large as 100 microns now and then as well. They wouldn't fare very well in an absolute rating.

So none of them are perfect. You look 'em over and you makes your choice.

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  • smp89

Posted November 23, 2005 - 04:13 AM

#24

just my 2 cents. I use the Ready Racing, no complaints. I even use the Ready Racing air filters.

  • Ga426owner

Posted November 23, 2005 - 06:57 AM

#25

Well I will chime in here to say I have been using a Scotts Filter - in fact the exact same one since 2001 - it has been in 3 of my last bikes including my 450 I have today. I have gotten back my initial investment 10 times over or more. The rubber seal has come off many times due to heat but I have glued it back everytime and replaced it once. I have never had any oil related issue on any of my bikes. So yes I am sold on the Scotts and plan on a purchase of a #2 Scotts for my 06....
Ready Filter may be good the same or whatever....but I am buying what has worked for me.....I do not need a ready filter cover.......either.

  • MotoGoalie

Posted November 23, 2005 - 07:27 AM

#26

Just for an interesting size comparison. A Polymorphonuclear nuetrophil, which is a basic white blood cell is approximately 35 microns in diameter. :p

That's really small. :ride: :applause:

  • Pukeballs

Posted November 25, 2005 - 04:59 PM

#27

I talked to a guy at Scotts, and he said not to use Carb cleaner on the oil filters. He said to use a mild contact cleaner. This true? :applause:





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