Ready Racing Oil Filter verses Scotts


26 replies to this topic
  • Thumparoobonzai

Posted November 04, 2005 - 02:47 PM

#1

I'm looking at buying one or the other of these oil filters for my new 06' YZ450F. I'm looking for a comparison between the two. I did a search and didn't find what I'm looking for. Is anyone familiar with both of them? How does the construction of both compare. I also here the rubber seal comes off in time. How have you guys been fixing it?

  • flintlock28

Posted November 04, 2005 - 05:56 PM

#2

I'm sure Grayracer will chime in on this one.......

I use the Scott's and I'm very happy with it. From what I remember; Grayracer had stated that somewhere Scott's posts all the specifications for their filters, and that the other manufacturers of Stainless filters don't give as much info. So that is why I bought the Scott's. Plus Scott's has a track record of performance, the other's I don't believe have been out very long to establish any real world results.

Don

  • schuon

Posted November 04, 2005 - 05:58 PM

#3

Don't run either. I like to run HiFlo Filtro oil filters. High quality and about $9 each. They are disposable filters. I wouldn't run a non disposable because metal particles would get trapped in between the screens and you could never get the filter completley clean again. So you'd pretty much be riding with a dirty oil filter. I wouldn't run them, just my opinion though.

  • flintlock28

Posted November 04, 2005 - 06:10 PM

#4

I disagree about the metal particles clogging the filter. The use of carb cleaner sprayed through the filter will dislodge any trapped particles. I don't remember the specs. but I believe the Scott's is known for removing much finer particles than any of the paper filters, and won't pass dirty oil thru the pressure relief valve (like a paper filter can during cold startup) If you change your oil relatively often like me...it will also save money in the long run (I think dealers charge about $ 11 for paper filters around here)

  • grayracer513

Posted November 04, 2005 - 07:47 PM

#5

Don't run either. I like to run HiFlo Filtro oil filters. High quality and about $9 each. They are disposable filters. I wouldn't run a non disposable because metal particles would get trapped in between the screens and you could never get the filter completley clean again. So you'd pretty much be riding with a dirty oil filter. I wouldn't run them, just my opinion though.

I would first like to point out that unless you just replaced your $9 HiFlo, the next time you start your bike, you will be doing so with a dirty oil filter.

This may come as a surprise to you, based on what you said, but the purpose of an oil filter is to get debris stuck in it. That's its job.

There is also only one screen in a Scotts, so there is nothing to get stuck between.

But, to the original question. Scotts is made from medical grade Swiss stainless steel mesh that filters to 35 microns absolute. That means that any spherical object as large as that will be stopped. Compare this to paper filters that typically get most of everything as fine as 25- 30 microns, but also pass through some things as large as 100. They pleat the elements about 30% deeper than OEM screen types, so the filter ends up with 50-60% more filter area than the stock one had. The seam where the screen overlaps at the ends is welded.

These facts are known about Scotts because they published them. The only thing that I know for certain that is different between them is that Ready has a removeable bypass valve "for cleaning". A pretty silly concept, considering the bypass valve is exposed, right on the end of the filter, and also that, at least in a Scotts, the filter has such a high flow rate (more than 20 gallons of cold 90wt per minute for a YZF) that the bypass will likely never open.

The only thing that Ready will tell you is that they filter to 35 microns, the mesh is "just like" that used in a Scotts, and that their filter is "as good as" a Scotts. Sounds like an endorsement.

Scotts is the original. If you want to know about them, they will tell you. Visit http://www.scottsonline.com/ They are also a TT sponsor.

I changed my oil about 18 times last year. Using HiFlos, that would have cost $162, compared to $65 for the Scotts, which is not only a better filter, I'll be using it this year, too.

As far as the seal goes, it's not glued on in the first place. If you knock it off, just put it back into its recess and don't worry about it. The moderator over on the 250F forum has been using the same one for 4 years.

  • Reyndogg

Posted November 04, 2005 - 09:31 PM

#6

Ive had the same Scotts in my YZ since Jan 2003 - still works great w/no issues at all.

  • Thumparoobonzai

Posted November 05, 2005 - 07:22 PM

#7

I went to Scotts web site and didn't see anything about a bypass on there filter. The bypass doesn't seem like a necessary component. Whats your thoughts.

  • tnl

Posted November 05, 2005 - 08:35 PM

#8

Go with the Scott's. I've had great results too!

  • cowboyona426

Posted November 05, 2005 - 08:52 PM

#9

What do the Scotts filters cost these days? I've been wanting one forever but haven't been able to scrape together the $ for one (I'm on a college budget and supporting a family, cut me some slack here).

  • ARin

Posted November 05, 2005 - 11:05 PM

#10

Ive been running a gold mesh filter from K&N.

i have no strong feelings about it one way or another. I just assume (hope) that it works.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • ARin

Posted November 05, 2005 - 11:10 PM

#11

actually, i just checked K&N's website...and cannot find my filter...maybe it isnt a K&N...

whatever the case, it is a fine mesh of gold color.

  • djbiker

Posted November 06, 2005 - 04:47 AM

#12

you can buy the ready filters here ironpony.com
the readys are just as good as the Scott's but less than half the price i run a ready filter in my 426 and love it they also come with a neat oil filter cover

  • elsinoredaze

Posted November 06, 2005 - 07:20 PM

#13

my local parts guy priced it $53.00

  • grayracer513

Posted November 07, 2005 - 10:50 AM

#14

I went to Scotts web site and didn't see anything about a bypass on there filter. The bypass doesn't seem like a necessary component. Whats your thoughts.

They have bypass valves built in and placed in the same location as the stock filter. Any full flow filter, meaning one through which all oil supplied to the engine must flow, has to have a bypass valve. Its purpose is to guarantee that oil will be delivered in the event that the filter becomes hopelessly clogged or otherwise causes such a significant pressure loss across the media that it threatens oil delivery. The OEM filters use a stamped steel check valve, but Scotts, because it is intended to be a semi-permanent part, uses a ball bearing on a machined seat. It's there, whether they bother to mention it or not. From a practical standpoint, unless you simply never clean the filter, the bypass on a Scotts will probably never be opened in operation.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 07, 2005 - 10:54 AM

#15

it is a fine mesh of gold color.

That would be either an OEM brass mesh filter of the kind that came with the '02 and earlier models, or a replacement for it. Those typically filter to about 70-80 microns, which is not really very fine at all, and being brass, it is easier to damage the mesh during cleaning, even without noticing it.

  • 642MX

Posted November 07, 2005 - 12:37 PM

#16

actually, i just checked K&N's website...and cannot find my filter...maybe it isnt a K&N...

whatever the case, it is a fine mesh of gold color.



Its a K&N 142 filter. I replace mine every year and clean it every oil change.

  • mick93

Posted November 08, 2005 - 11:53 PM

#17

Sorry guys, have to chime in here. Can't sit back and watch Ready Racing get bashed based on bad information. Here are the facts: The reason that you may have heard that the Ready Racing CompFlow filter is the same as Scotts is because it is true. There is no magic to what either company is producing. Scotts does not manufacture the filtering material. Both companies purchase the stainless steel 35 micron filter cloth from the same Swiss manufacturer and it is identical in spec. The material is then assembled with machined aluminum parts and held together with a very strong epoxy. Neoprene gaskets are used. Some of the filters also have bypass valves, the purpose of which was explained in an earlier post. No magic...just off the shelf materials.

In my humble opinion the Ready Racing filter seems to be built better, but honestly the only real difference between these two products is price.

Ready Racing charges $49.95 retail (filter only) and Scotts charges $69.95 retail. Ready also made the product a little more interesting by bundling in a CNC machined anodized billet oil filter cover for most of the popular dirt bikes like CRFs, YZs etc. for an extra $10. So for $59.95 you get the filter and a very trick part to put on your bike. Here's a picture of the cover: http://store1.yimg.c...922_1865_727953 Here's a picture of the filter: http://store1.yimg.c...22_1870_3617232

If you want to spend the extra $$$ on a Scotts, go right ahead. :applause:

  • grayracer513

Posted November 09, 2005 - 09:21 AM

#18

Scotts does not manufacture the filtering material.

Never said otherwise.

Scotts is made from medical grade Swiss stainless steel mesh that filters to 35 microns absolute.

Can't sit back and watch Ready Racing get bashed based on bad information.

What information would that be, specifically?

Both companies purchase the stainless steel 35 micron filter cloth from the same Swiss manufacturer and it is identical in spec. The material is then assembled with machined aluminum parts and held together with a very strong epoxy. Neoprene gaskets are used. Some of the filters also have bypass valves, the purpose of which was explained in an earlier post. No magic...just off the shelf materials.

In my humble opinion the Ready Racing filter seems to be built better

Interesting statement to make after describing them as being made identically. The truth is that the information Ready offers concerning the construction consists of a single sentence, quoting, "Constructed from Swiss made, precision stainless steel filter cloth, CompFlow will filter particles as small as 35 microns and is the best protection you can buy for your 4-stroke engine, end of story." Not much detail there. But lets assume you are correct in that the mesh is the same stuff. How many square inches of media surface are in the filter compared with the Scotts? Do they weld the vertical seam as Scotts does, or just roll it? Will the Allen screw retaining the bypass valve shake loose?

And what in the world is so "trick" about the oil filter cover. The one I have does everything theirs does, I'm sure.

If you want to spend the extra $$$ on a Scotts, go right ahead. :applause:

Right now, the fact is that I don't need to, because I own two of them already. However, I will be buying another Scotts for Junior's next bike.

  • mick93

Posted November 10, 2005 - 12:28 PM

#19

Hey Gray,

The bad info I was referring to was the statement about a removable bypass valve for cleaning and how it is a silly concept. Ready's bypass valve is not removable. Maybe you were thinking of another manufacturer?

Regarding the "trick" oil filter cover. If you can't recognize what is trick about a CNC machined billet aluminum part that is anodized black with an engraved logo, then the stock cover is definitely for you.

You seem like a pretty technical guy who likes to know lots of details. Perhaps Ready Racing should list more of that type of info on the web.

  • crashyz426

Posted November 10, 2005 - 03:04 PM

#20

I've been running the ready filter for 3 months now and it works great. It was a great priced item that is almost identical as the scotts, if not identical. I dont think there is a need to argue about which one is better, in reality as long as youve got a clean filter in your bike, your good, that includes whether you install a new one each time or if you clean out any number of the aftermarket reuseable filters. You've got a clean filter in your bike and that is important thing.





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