Riding Tips



7 replies to this topic
  • Robert_Brazil

Posted August 20, 2001 - 08:27 AM

#1

This weekend I ran my WR2001 for the second time after breaking it in the previous weekend on open terrain. This weekend me and my buddies took it for a ride into part of Brazil's beautiful jungle nature. As part of terrain is quite hilly and difficult'terrain (ruts, tree roots, rocks and other terrain abstacles etc) , the engine stalled several times (okay I still have to get used to this bike, and I slightly increased the idle rotation level). Although my bike starts perfectly under normal conditions, I have a big problem starting this bike on a >30 degree uphill angle with little or no possibilities to turn the bike sideways. Moreover the front brake alone doesn't stop the bike from sliding down. I had to call the help from my buddies to hold the rear brake lever for me, meanwhile starting. Can anyone tell me if they have simular starting difficulties and how they solve it.

My second question is, when I am going downhill, can I start this bike by getting some speed and letting the clutch go. I am concerned to do this, since I experienced this a couple of times when I braked the engine dead yet where the bike still had sufficient momentum that it was VERY difficult to get it back to life this way, it seemed to protest!. I don't want to damage my new bike. If it doesn't do any harm what is the best way to start this way. I suppose I can not touch the decompression lever.

Talking about decompression lever, what's the best position for this thing. It came stock on the left side right above the clutch lever (easiliy confusable) and vulnerable despite hand guards, so I moved it down, below the lever, now I noticed that my left knee sometimes hits it. Is there any consencus what is the best place for this lever?

Thanks a million for your feedback in anticipation!

Robert

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steijntr

  • Scott_F

Posted August 20, 2001 - 10:03 AM

#2

Robert, try a 13 tooth countershaft sprocket.

I position my stock decomp lever on top. I don't like levers in my knees. Now I use an aftermarket combination clutch/decomp lever, available from Flanders. It is a XR650R replica.

  • Steve_Morgan

Posted August 20, 2001 - 12:42 PM

#3

Hi Robert,
Wow, single-track in the forests of Brazil, you've got to post some pics for us!
If top speed is not a priority, the 13 tooth counter shaft will help in the tight steep stuff. Generous amounts of clutch slipping & higer revs will keep it running, then you won't have to worry about starting in difficult situations. If it does stall, you'll often need to pull the hot-start briefly to get it going again. These bikes just won't chug along reliably like XR's. Some guys add flywheel weights for woods riding. My comp release is also below the clutch lever, but I've never hit it with my knee, maybe some taller bars are in order for you? My levers are straight forward (not downwards), and the comp release lever is underneath and also forward. I often tap the comp release when bump-starting, just don't hold it in too far or too long, it's actually depressing an exhaust valve.
Steve

  • Hick

Posted August 20, 2001 - 03:38 PM

#4

You cannot hurt anything by holding the compression release in (I’ve tried). Of course, it won’t run until you let it go. I routinely bump start mine, and you can’t do this without the compression release (unless you find a REALLY big hill).

If you can, point the bike across the hill, instead of down it, when you need to start it, just make sure the left side is the uphill side so you can touch.

Hope this helps.

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  • Robert_Brazil

Posted August 21, 2001 - 03:11 AM

#5

Originally posted by Hick:
You cannot hurt anything by holding the compression release in (I’ve tried). Of course, it won’t run until you let it go. I routinely bump start mine, and you can’t do this without the compression release (unless you find a REALLY big hill).

If you can, point the bike across the hill, instead of down it, when you need to start it, just make sure the left side is the uphill side so you can touch.

Hope this helps.


______________________________
Thanks this is really helpfull. If the lever actually lifts one of the exhausts valves, doesn't it hit the piston if I hold it?

What is the exact secondary transmission suggested besides a 13 tooth sprocket.

I'll definitely post some pictures later on.

Robert



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steijntr

  • Hick

Posted August 21, 2001 - 06:24 AM

#6

The valve will not hit the piston when engaged by the compression release. If this were possible it would do so every time you used it, and then how would you start your bike?

I think Scott’s suggestion was to leave the rear sprocket stock (50?) and change the front from a 14 to a 13. The advantages of this tip are you can use the same chain length (you won’t have to add or remove links), you will only have to adjust the tension a small amount, but it is a significant gearing difference, almost 8% lower, which should help on the tight trails down there.

Hope this helps.

  • *mike68*

Posted August 21, 2001 - 06:56 AM

#7

A 52 will fit on the rear with no changes to the chain and will shorten the wheel base about an inch.

  • WR_Jason

Posted August 21, 2001 - 07:06 AM

#8

I swung my decomp lever to the right side so its easier to work the clutch with one hand and the decomp with the other for bump starts down hill. It also allows me to more or less lay the bike on the left side of a hill and start it from the right side once I get in in nutral incase I ever get stuck on a steep hill :) . This may work for you if your slipping down hill while trying to start it too :D .
When is someone going to make an aftermarket cam with a cintrifical decomp on it??????
BBR, Thumper racing,,,,, helloooowww McFly!!!




 
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