Removing valves from 426.


5 replies to this topic
  • Stranglersfan

Posted October 02, 2005 - 01:32 PM

#1

Does anyone know of a suitable valve spring compressor that's good enough to get these valves out, i'd hate to think how much a genuine Yamaha one will cost from the dealers? what about a D.I.Y one? have tried an automobile one from Halfords and found it to be useless so took it straight back for a refund.
Also, what about a Flywheel puller? Again is that a specialist one from a dealer?
This engine stripdown is going to be expensive enough without extra cost to have to buy specialist tools from Yamaha...
Any advice or tips guys, bearing in mind i'm in the U.K so dealers in the U.S. would be a bit long to wait on delivery etc, pity tho, as prices here in "Ol' Blighty" are rather more expensive than what you lucky so-n-so's have to pay.. :banghead:

  • SXP

Posted October 02, 2005 - 03:05 PM

#2

Does anyone know of a suitable valve spring compressor that's good enough to get these valves out, i'd hate to think how much a genuine Yamaha one will cost from the dealers? what about a D.I.Y one? have tried an automobile one from Halfords and found it to be useless so took it straight back for a refund.
Also, what about a Flywheel puller? Again is that a specialist one from a dealer?
This engine stripdown is going to be expensive enough without extra cost to have to buy specialist tools from Yamaha...
Any advice or tips guys, bearing in mind i'm in the U.K so dealers in the U.S. would be a bit long to wait on delivery etc, pity tho, as prices here in "Ol' Blighty" are rather more expensive than what you lucky so-n-so's have to pay.. :banghead:


You don't need a specialized tool to remove the valves. With the head off, use a piece of wood (or any material softer than the head/valve) - I used a piece of a wooden dowel - to support/push against the valve. One end of the dowel is against the valve (in the combustion chamber) and the other end will be on your work bench. The purpose of this is to keep the valve from dropping into the head when you push against the spring from the top. Then, use an open ended wrench (spanner) - I think I used a 10 mm (maybe a 12 mm) - to straddle the top of the valve stem and push down on the washer/cup that goes over the spring from the top. This will expose the two retaining collets(?) that can then be easily popped out. That's it, you are done! Simple and cheap. To install, reverse the process. A second pair of hands to pop out the collets once they are exposed would be really useful here as you will have your hands full pushing on the spring while balancing the head on the piece of dowel (good time to recruit your wife/GF), and use a towel around the other end of the spanner or it will dig into your palm.

As far as the flywheel goes, MotionPro sells a really cheap puller here in the US for about $15. Dunno about your neck of the woods.

  • Stranglersfan

Posted October 02, 2005 - 03:49 PM

#3

Sounds like a good idea that, i'll give it a go tomorrow. I wouldn't have thought the valves were that easy to compress via hand but then again i ain't tried it yet, it being my first ever strip of a WR. I'll have a look see if i can find a Motionpro retailer in the U.K. too..
Thanks. :banghead:

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  • SXP

Posted October 02, 2005 - 05:14 PM

#4

The springs are really not that hard to compress as long as the valve is supported with the dowel from the other end. I've used this method twice on my WR400 without any problems. Let us know how it goes.

  • Stranglersfan

Posted October 03, 2005 - 10:46 AM

#5

yep that method works! i packed a cloth under the combustion chamber and then a block of wood and applied some pressure to the spring retainers with a 10mm spanner with one hand and a magnetic pen in the other and once the spring was compressed the retainers jumped clear thanks to the magnet, works a treat, though i reckon it's going to be a bit tricky re-assembling them this way without a spare pair of hands, so she'll be called to the garage to help, i'll just make sure her hands are full before she gets there, with tea and biscuits! :banghead:

cheers, saved me the cost of a valve spring compressor. Now if i could just find an alternative method of removing the flywheel? :banghead:

  • SXP

Posted October 03, 2005 - 12:21 PM

#6

Cool, glad it worked.

Apart from the flywheel puller you will need a means to push (and pull when installing) the crank out of the left case bearing (it's a press fit). I was able to improvise a tool using threaded rods and an old steering wheel puller. When installing the crank remember to freeze it overnight in your fridge and heat the bearing with a propane torch to expand it. During one rebuild the crank dropped right into the bearing (I was reusing the old bearing), in the other I had to use my improvised tool to pull the crank back into the bearing (new bearing). If you are changing all the bearings out, then there is one bearing in the left case that will require a "blind hole bearing puller". You'll see what I mean once you have the case split. Good luck. If you want pics of any of the tools let me know.




 
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