Engine Ice---Worth the $$$


31 replies to this topic
  • mightymouse291

Posted September 15, 2005 - 08:26 AM

#1

Can anyone vouch for the engine ice. I had to replace the radiator, and was wondering if the twenty bucks is worth the "50 degrees cooler temperature".

Help me out here....

  • jamieyz426f01

Posted September 15, 2005 - 08:38 AM

#2

i would say so heat=less horsepower,so if you can decrease that heat in any way it is a good thing.Not sure how much would be "gained" by the engine ice.:banghead:

  • grayracer513

Posted September 15, 2005 - 08:40 AM

#3

I've been running it in the 250F for 8 months, and it's been working out fine. No heating problems at all, although we didn't have much before, either. Can't say whether it's really 50 degrees cooler or not, but I can't remember having had to add any at all. I guess that's something.

  • grayracer513

Posted September 15, 2005 - 09:10 AM

#4

i would say so heat=less horsepower,so if you can decrease that heat in any way it is a good thing.

This is going to sound a little bizarre at first, but the fact is that generating heat is the whole idea of setting gasoline on fire in the first place, and using 35% of the heat from combustion to heat water with it is lost power, not gained.

The purpose of the gasoline internal combustion engine (any kind), is to extract the energy stored in fuel in the form of heat, capture as much of that as possible, and convert it to rotating force. About a third is lost through the exhaust (turbos are so efficient because they recover about half of that loss), and a little more than that is wasted warming up water so we can ship it to a radiator and make it cold again.

Ideally, we would get rid of the cooling system, but the reality is that we make engines out of metal, and the best metals can only take so much. So we do what we have to. Interestingly (or not), Kyocera experimented with a engine with no cooling system. It was built entirely of ceramics in all areas exposed to combustion temperatures. There were several obvious problems. One was that the lubrication had to be built into the materials themselves, since the surface temperatures were far beyond the flash point of any kind of oil. Fuel had to be directly injected to the combustion chamber, sort of a "semi-diesel" thing, because the fuel would ignite on contact with any part of the intake port. They were impressed with the fuel efficiency, but there were still all kinds of difficulties to resolve (like what to do with the underhood heat), and it was just an experiment anyway, so nothing more that I know of has been done with it. But it proved a point.

Did I mention that another problem was that it was extremely sensitive to having a wrench dropped on it? :banghead:

  • Fly-nBri

Posted September 15, 2005 - 10:11 AM

#5

LOVE IT!!! :banghead: :applause:

  • ONLY4STROKES

Posted September 15, 2005 - 11:26 AM

#6

i would say so heat=less horsepower,so if you can decrease that heat in any way it is a good thing.Not sure how much would be "gained" by the engine ice.:banghead:


Actually, the opposite is true. The more heat you have, the more horsepower you get. You could make your dirtbike as fast as the space shuttle if your engine could handle the heat. Aftermarket coolants (some) allow your bike's boiling point to rise, enabling you more horsepower in the process.

I run Engine Ice in my YZF, and it works just as well as the stock stuff did. I'm not sure how many more degrees cooler my bike is running (I dont use heat strips, and I never had any problems with the stock coolant), but I definitely dont have anything bad to say about the stuff. Worth the cash.

  • ONLY4STROKES

Posted September 15, 2005 - 11:28 AM

#7

I've been running it in the 250F for 8 months, and it's been working out fine. No heating problems at all, although we didn't have much before, either. Can't say whether it's really 50 degrees cooler or not, but I can't remember having had to add any at all. I guess that's something.

50 degrees is alot, I think Engine Ice says something like 20 degrees cooler.

  • yamasaki

Posted September 15, 2005 - 11:44 AM

#8

i use it on all my bikes too, except my air cooled ones. ;-)

  • jamieyz426f01

Posted September 15, 2005 - 12:10 PM

#9

yes obviously the engine needs to be running at optimum temperature to ignite the fuel,but what i meant was that as the engine gets past that optimum running temperature engine fatigue sets in and every degree counts.
:banghead:

  • MotoGoalie

Posted September 15, 2005 - 12:11 PM

#10

Spend $50 or $3 or $53 dollars.

http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=291474

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Ga426owner

Posted September 15, 2005 - 12:18 PM

#11

Can anyone vouch for the engine ice. I had to replace the radiator, and was wondering if the twenty bucks is worth the "50 degrees cooler temperature".

Help me out here....



a 100% YES!!!!!!!!!!!! :banghead:

  • ncmountainman

Posted September 15, 2005 - 03:46 PM

#12

well it depends on how hot your getting your bike? i couldn't keep 50/50 in my bike, so i tried engine ice and was not impressed. it seemed as though it boiled out faster. someone then reccomended mixing some water wetter with it and it seemed to improve but its staying capacity was no better than the 50/50. i then tried evans npg-r and have yet to add to the fluid level all summer :banghead:

  • flintlock28

Posted September 15, 2005 - 04:18 PM

#13

Here in the Mid-Atlantic states, we often get a number of 90 degree days, with high humidity. When I used standard 50/50 antifreeze/water, and let my bike idle over about 3 minutes back on tight trails, I would start to get a little overflow from the radiator. After I flushed out the system and ran straight Engine Ice, in the same conditions, I haven't seen any more overflow, and that has been about 5 minutes of idling. I would say that the product does work, but I can't give a value as to how many degrees difference. I think Engine Ice says an average of 15- 20 degrees, and in some circumstances up to 50 degrees, according to what I remember reading about the product.

  • ONLY4STROKES

Posted September 15, 2005 - 04:37 PM

#14

yes obviously the engine needs to be running at optimum temperature to ignite the fuel,but what i meant was that as the engine gets past that optimum running temperature engine fatigue sets in and every degree counts.
:applause:

Yes, obviously.

But I dont see your point. :banghead:

  • str8away

Posted September 15, 2005 - 08:19 PM

#15

Yes, obviously.

But I dont see your point. :applause:



i don't see your point. u say u never had a problem w/ the stock coolant and the engine ice worked just as good as the stock stuff...but its worth the cash ???:banghead: makes a lot of sense

oh well, at least u increased your post count :lol:

  • probikerguy2

Posted September 16, 2005 - 03:16 PM

#16

I used engine ice for a while..good stuff but i prefer Evans NPG its expensive but worth every penny.

  • DigilubeJay

Posted September 17, 2005 - 02:49 AM

#17

Engine Ice is nothing but deionized water and propylene glycol. Folks...this is not rocket science here. Claims of reduction of heat due to simply using this product are nothing but mumbo jumbo. Words of marketing for the less than knowlegable.

Engine Ice is a convienience item, nothing more. It is easy to open the jug and pour it in the radiator. It is a pre-mixed coolant that is nothing special.

You can obtain the VERY same results by going to the auto store and buying a gallon of propylene glycol (the non-toxic sort of anti-freeze) and a gallon of distilled water.
You will have at that point about 2 gallons of coolant for approx $9.00

OR you can go out and buy Engine Ice that has taken the mixing out of the picture....and spend $70-80 bucks on two gallons....
Let's do the math!

LOL....

  • jamieyz426f01

Posted September 17, 2005 - 05:27 AM

#18

i don't see your point. u say u never had a problem w/ the stock coolant and the engine ice worked just as good as the stock stuff...but its worth the cash ???:banghead: makes a lot of sense

oh well, at least u increased your post count :applause:


are you referring to me? or "onlyfourstrokes"?? i have never used engine ice because i don't know if it is available over here,but it sounds like a good product if your bike is overheating.

  • Satch0922

Posted September 17, 2005 - 05:37 AM

#19

I used Engine Ice in my 426 and I use it in my 250 smoker. I am a sucker for marketing ploys..... :banghead:

  • ncmountainman

Posted September 17, 2005 - 05:58 AM

#20

I used Engine Ice in my 426 and I use it in my 250 smoker. I am a sucker for marketing ploys..... :applause:

its a nice yamaha blue,that alone should be worth it :banghead:





Related Content

Reviews

Yamaha YZ450F 2017 by Chris.GVS


Yamaha YZ450F 2017
  • - - - - -
  • 0 reviews
Forums
Photo

yz250x vs 450 4t comparisons (preferably desert riding) needed by JakeNorthrupYZ450F


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   Yamaha 2-Stroke
  • 9 replies
Forums
Photo

2016 YZ450 by CaptainKnobby


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   Suspension
  • Hot  59 replies
Forums
Photo
Motocross

Thinking about Yamaha 250... by Arctic Pride


Dirt Bike   Special Interest Forums   Pro Racing
  • Hot  491 replies
Forums
Photo

Megabomb Fitment by 288yz450


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   YZ 400/426/450
  • 1 reply
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.