Front Wheel not true


14 replies to this topic
  • dunecj2a

Posted July 01, 2005 - 07:34 AM

#1

Anyone else have a front wheel thats a little wobbly :) I was tightening my spokes out at the track last night and noticed that it wasnt straight and true anymore. :D The wheel isnt dented just a little wobbly.
Any way to fix this or just leave it be:confused:
Do you guys think it really matters anyways when your riding a chopped and rutted track :) Can you even notice a difference :D

  • grayracer513

Posted July 01, 2005 - 07:58 AM

#2

Yes it matters.

See if this helps: http://www.motoclass...nts/spokes.html

  • Beanb1

Posted July 01, 2005 - 09:04 AM

#3

The smoother the ride the better. The simple answer to your question, loosen the spokes on the side of the wheel that goes out, tighten the spokes on the opposite site to pull the wheel back into alignment. If you can put (tape) a ruler or similar scale on the fork (front) or swing arm (rear) next to the rim, you can use your bike to align the wheel. spin the wheel and you can see where the wheel bend out. Taking the tire off make seeing the alignment of the wheel easier, but it can be done with the tire on. Accuracy will be less with the tire on.

When tightening your spokes in the future, do every third spoke and change with every rotation of the tire. This will help to keep you from pulling the wheel out of alignment.

  • Dolce_Grappa

Posted July 01, 2005 - 09:07 AM

#4

You'll need to true your wheels, so there is less than .080" runout. Buy yourself a dial indicator and magnetic base attach to your fork tube and true. I found with spoke torque wrenches, that you can make the rim out of true, while even following the every third spoke rule. Using a dial indicator allows you to witness the changes made to the wheel.

  • dunecj2a

Posted July 01, 2005 - 09:18 AM

#5

I don't have a spoke torque wrench. How can I tell if I'm overtightening. Should I go back and loosen the spokes a little and try to true it.

  • Dolce_Grappa

Posted July 01, 2005 - 09:42 AM

#6

Once true, I'll go back through with the spoke torque wrench. If they feel really tight they are! We're only talking 48in-lbs pounds of torque, not much. I would start with loosening all the spokes a little, relatively the same tension. Then start from you valve stem or your rim lock and work your way around. If you tighten your left spoke to a positive reading, next tighten right spoke below or above to zero, about the same tension. If it feels to tight try the the opposite right spoke. Good luck and have a beer handy!!

  • dunecj2a

Posted July 01, 2005 - 10:49 AM

#7

Yeah sounds like a six pack job :) Thanx for the help!!!!

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  • grayracer513

Posted July 01, 2005 - 04:20 PM

#8

I don't have a spoke torque wrench. How can I tell if I'm overtightening. Should I go back and loosen the spokes a little and try to true it.

Back before anyone even thought of a spoke torque wrench, we "pinged" the spokes, and guaged their tension by the tone they produced. You need a like wheel for a comparison.

  • dunecj2a

Posted July 02, 2005 - 08:52 PM

#9

Yeah thanx Gray :)

  • Hick

Posted July 03, 2005 - 12:29 PM

#10

Back before anyone even thought of a spoke torque wrench, we "pinged" the spokes, and guaged their tension by the tone they produced. You need a like wheel for a comparison.


This is a good trick that I still use (who wants to spend $100 on a spoke torque wrench?) but it isn't always perfect. Sometimes you will get a false note if the spoke is tweaked, but it is a good way to identify a spoke that is looser or tighter than the rest, and anytime you have a wheel out of true this is what you should be looking for.

OTOH sometimes you will get a false torque reading due to grunge, corrosion, or thread damage on the nipple, a common thing, so I wouldn't totally trust a torque wrench anyway unless I was working on freshly installed spokes.

What I do whenever I'm checking my spoke tension or trying to true up a wheel is back off each nipple 1/4 to 1/2 turn, and then tighten it. This gives you a much better indication of tension that just tightening it straight off.



Hope this helps.

  • dunecj2a

Posted July 05, 2005 - 07:41 AM

#11

Hey Hick how hard is it to true the wheel? I pulled the tire off last night and loosened the spokes up. The wheel is way wobbly :D
Do you start by tightening every 4th spoke or do you skip around from 1 side of the rim. :)
Should I try it or take it to a shop :)

  • grayracer513

Posted July 05, 2005 - 09:17 AM

#12

Have you looked over the article at the link I posted? It's a time consuming, and sometimes frustrating process, especially when you're learning it, but it's much more tedious than it is hard work.

One problem you might have is that it is much more difficult to true a rim that is actually bent than it is to do a new or straight one. In fact, there is a very limited amount of straightening the spokes can do for you if the rim is deformed. Spokes can't take out flat spots, or straighten out a twisted section, for example, but if the rim is off center, out of round, out of flat (wavy side-to-side), you can work those things out with the spokes.

I have always found it easiest to use the threads that show under the nipple as a guide to running the spokes down uniformly. Usually, if you run the nipples on until there is about 2-4 threads left, the spokes will still be quite loose, but they will now all be the same length. Run them tighter a half turn at a time until they are fairly snug, but still all tightened the same amount, and check to see if the rim needs any sort of correction. During the initial run up, I usually just go around the wheel spoke by spoke. As it starts to become snug, I'll tighten every 7th spoke (because 7 normally won't divide evenly into the number of spokes) until I've counted up to the total number in the wheel. Then I'll go back to drawing them up spoke by spoke again as they get tighter.

It's best if you can get some one to teach you one on one, but you can learn it on your own.

  • Hick

Posted July 05, 2005 - 09:20 AM

#13

Well, I would first tighten every 3rd just slightly until they were all about the same.

Then I would try to use spoke tension to straighten the wheel out as described by another poster above (tighten spokes more on one side to "pull" the rim back to true).

I use a zip tie on the fork leg to gauge/find the wobbly spot(s).

You can almost always salvage a rim that is out of true this way, but if it has a flat spot it is probably toast. Provided you are careful and have a good spoke wrench I don't see any harm in trying to straighten it yourself before you resort to using a shop.


Hope this helps.

  • dunecj2a

Posted July 05, 2005 - 10:42 AM

#14

Have you looked over the article at the link I posted? It's a time consuming, and sometimes frustrating process, especially when you're learning it, but it's much more tedious than it is hard work.

One problem you might have is that it is much more difficult to true a rim that is actually bent than it is to do a new or straight one. In fact, there is a very limited amount of straightening the spokes can do for you if the rim is deformed. Spokes can't take out flat spots, or straighten out a twisted section, for example, but if the rim is off center, out of round, out of flat (wavy side-to-side), you can work those things out with the spokes.

I have always found it easiest to use the threads that show under the nipple as a guide to running the spokes down uniformly. Usually, if you run the nipples on until there is about 2-4 threads left, the spokes will still be quite loose, but they will now all be the same length. Run them tighter a half turn at a time until they are fairly snug, but still all tightened the same amount, and check to see if the rim needs any sort of correction. During the initial run up, I usually just go around the wheel spoke by spoke. As it starts to become snug, I'll tighten every 7th spoke (because 7 normally won't divide evenly into the number of spokes) until I've counted up to the total number in the wheel. Then I'll go back to drawing them up spoke by spoke again as they get tighter.

It's best if you can get some one to teach you one on one, but you can learn it on your own.

Yeah Gray Thanx for that link. The only problem I'm having now is that my wheel isnt getting straight even when I skip spokes. I am gonna try your advice on watching the threads and snug them up.
It could be also that my rim is a beat up. I'm gonna really loosen up my spokes and see if my rim is tweaked. What do you think about that idea?
If it looks OK then I will try again. Thanx alot for the help :)

  • dunecj2a

Posted July 05, 2005 - 10:44 AM

#15

Well, I would first tighten every 3rd just slightly until they were all about the same.

Then I would try to use spoke tension to straighten the wheel out as described by another poster above (tighten spokes more on one side to "pull" the rim back to true).

I use a zip tie on the fork leg to gauge/find the wobbly spot(s).

You can almost always salvage a rim that is out of true this way, but if it has a flat spot it is probably toast. Provided you are careful and have a good spoke wrench I don't see any harm in trying to straighten it yourself before you resort to using a shop.


Hope this helps.

Yeah Thanx Hick :)





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