Front end wash-out


15 replies to this topic
  • beakr

Posted June 21, 2005 - 10:36 AM

#1

On my '04 WR450, I somtimes feel like my front end isn't as planted as it should be and wants to wash out in corners. I'm riding mostly single track with rocks, and dry decomposed granite sand on the trails. I have felt the same thing, though on less sandy soil, where I thought traction would be far better. I've read lots of posts slamming on the stock tires (which I am riding on).

Any of you have the same issue? Do you suppose this is a tire thing, or could it be a set-up problem. . .ie: to much fork compression damping, or forks too high in the triple clamps etc.? :)

I'm 6'3, 195 lbs riding stock tires & stock suspension (although I've backed out the fork compression damping a couple of clicks).

Thanks for the input. . . :)

  • sausage boy

Posted June 21, 2005 - 10:46 AM

#2

On my '04 WR450, I somtimes feel like my front end isn't as planted as it should be and wants to wash out in corners. I'm riding mostly single track with rocks, and dry decomposed granite sand on the trails. I have felt the same thing, though on less sandy soil, where I thought traction would be far better. I've read lots of posts slamming on the stock tires (which I am riding on).

Any of you have the same issue? Do you suppose this is a tire thing, or could it be a set-up problem. . .ie: to much fork compression damping, or forks too high in the triple clamps etc.? :)

I'm 6'3, 195 lbs riding stock tires & stock suspension (although I've backed out the fork compression damping a couple of clicks).

Thanks for the input. . . :)

hey,
i have an 05 WR450 with the standard Dunlops on it and my front end washes out the same. i nearly crashed big time last weekend, i was going flat out in forth gear when the front end (without warning) let go. i stamped my foot that hard on the ground i had pins and needles in my knee :D .
i'm not going to bother adjusting the forks until i've changed tire's. i think i'm going for the Bridgestons. :D

  • banffboy

Posted June 21, 2005 - 11:09 AM

#3

try raising your fork legs to the first line, then tires, then suspension

  • rushfan

Posted June 21, 2005 - 11:19 AM

#4

try raising your fork legs to the first line, then tires, then suspension



Do you mean raising them in the clamps? Please, teach me :)

  • banffboy

Posted June 21, 2005 - 01:33 PM

#5

Do you mean raising them in the clamps? Please, teach me :)


yep raise them in the clamps. You'll see a line around the top about a quarter of an inch below the cap. It brings the rake of your fork in, that way your over top more, this promotes quicker turn in, don't go to far or your bikes handling will get quite squirrly

  • sharpmarble

Posted June 21, 2005 - 01:41 PM

#6

The stock tires suck....I went with the Kenda Millville on the front and couldn't be happier, it is a great tire for mixed terrain :)

  • ckulzer

Posted June 21, 2005 - 05:20 PM

#7

The 2 best things I did to my 03 was put on Michelin M-12s and put on a 5.8 shock spring (210 lbs). The spring made it handle worlds better. It rides higher in the stroke and the front stays planted.

  • Lowedog

Posted June 21, 2005 - 06:26 PM

#8

I have to agree with ckulzer on the spring. I put 2 seasons on my '03 on stock springs before going with a 5.8 Racetech rear spring this year. I too am about 210. I was surprised, the spring made a big differance in the action of the shock. I always thought the suspension was pretty damn good stock. Big improvement! :) According to Racetech's spring rate chart the fork springs are pretty close so I haven't bothered with those.

As for the stock Dunlops, I must be a little strange in that departmant because I have always liked the 739's. I have never had a problem with the wash out everybody talks about with the stock tires. I have gone through a few sets of the 739's now on my WR and have never understood why everyone hates them. I feel a lot of the problem is suspension setup. If your not setting your rider sag you need too. That comes first then you can start playing with adjustments after that. At 195lbs you should be able to get real close with the sag on the stock spring as I was close with my stock spring.

I think I'm going to give the Michelin M-12's a try next to see if I just don't realize what I'm missing.

:) Lowedog

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • BIGMatt

Posted June 21, 2005 - 08:02 PM

#9

I agree with Lowdog about the tires and suspension.
I a big dude at 250+lbs, and I experienced major front end wash out when I first bought my 2004 WR450. I softened the slow speed rear compression damping to keep more weight over the rear end and that helped out a lot! I still want to get a different rear spring for my fat a$$, but it has been a tolerable fix for now.

  • thumpawoody

Posted June 22, 2005 - 05:29 AM

#10

I lowered the tripple clamps to the second ring on my o3 wr450 and fitted the michy and run pressures from 12-14psi.
I found lowering the tripple clamps solved the problem.
I am 195 cm and tip the scales at 100kg.
I think that taller riders have trouble getting weight onto the front,
lowering the tripples clamps changes the weight dispersal in the same way as fitting the heavier rear spring (My next move).
The book says that the bike is set for an 80kg rider out of the box

  • tagger

Posted June 22, 2005 - 09:06 AM

#11

most people want to find a technical answer to these things - the front tire works better in certain terrain over others, and certainly reducing rake will help w/ handling. HOWEVER, riding technique is usually the culprit and the rest should be left to "fine" tuning. IMHO

  • JTWR450

Posted June 22, 2005 - 10:31 AM

#12

On my '04 WR450, I somtimes feel like my front end isn't as planted as it should be and wants to wash out in corners. I'm riding mostly single track with rocks, and dry decomposed granite sand on the trails. I have felt the same thing, though on less sandy soil, where I thought traction would be far better. I've read lots of posts slamming on the stock tires (which I am riding on).

Any of you have the same issue? Do you suppose this is a tire thing, or could it be a set-up problem. . .ie: to much fork compression damping, or forks too high in the triple clamps etc.? :)

I'm 6'3, 195 lbs riding stock tires & stock suspension (although I've backed out the fork compression damping a couple of clicks).

Thanks for the input. . . :)


Beakr,
I feel your pain buddy as we seem to be riding the same damn terrain. Like has been posted, move your forks aqnd rip off that tire ASAP. The donlop that comes on it is junk, same for the rear, at least in the terrain we seem to ride. By the way, where are you in the land of the Spud?? I am over in the Victor/Driggs area so if you make the journey this way lets go get a ride in.

  • beakr

Posted June 22, 2005 - 11:03 AM

#13

I'm in the Treasure Valley--I'd love to come over and ride some of the stuff in your neck of the woods. That shore is some purty country right thar. I'll have to see if we can get some riding buddies together for a road trip and you can show us around sometime. (So many trails--so little time!)

Thanks for the tips guys, I'll see what I can come up with for a new front tire, and try raising the forks a little. It's tough to ride fast when you're always worried about the front end going left when you want it to go right. :)

  • oregonwr450

Posted June 22, 2005 - 11:22 PM

#14

I also have to say the racetech 5.8 (215 pounds) really made a differance on handling and rebound.

  • RNS

Posted June 23, 2005 - 03:32 PM

#15

You need to remember stand up and ride much farther forward than you are used too to stop washing out the front end. For a while I felt like I would fall in front of the bike. I rode a KDX for years and going over to a 4Stroke was different for me in that respect. The right tires will help for sure (Maxis IT's F&R), but if your not planting the front tire when get on the gas you will wash out. First check you rider sag and static sag to get the right spring rate on the rear as well as front. I also found slowing the rebound on the front forks will help at speed if its rutty and bumpy. The manual has all the info.

RNS

  • hypersport

Posted June 23, 2005 - 06:21 PM

#16

Hey Beakr, I'm in the Treasure Valley too. Meridian to be exact. Ever make it over to Emmitt?

I just got my 05 WR 450, and didn't leave Snake River without replacing the front with a 756. Great tire, and no problems so far. ( I used the same tire on my previous 03 WR 250).

On another note, does the 05 450 come with a 756 on the rear? When I got home and put the stock (739 I think) in the garage, I noticed the rear was a 756. I was expecting a matching tire to the stock front, and I was just gonna wear it out before switching. Needless to say, I was pleased to have the 756 on the back, as I've got experience with it and like it a lot.

Either it came with the 756 (don't know why Yamaha would mix the tires stock) or my dealer accidentally mounted one for me at no cost.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.