Coolant drip


12 replies to this topic
  • timvv51

Posted March 23, 2005 - 05:34 AM

#1

Started my 03 wr450 up today preparing to change the oil. Had allready taken the skid plate off and saw about 15 or 20 drops of coolant drip out of the weep hole at the bottom of the water pump housing. Then it quit and didnt dripped any more. First time I have seen this, possibly been going on for a while unnoticed because of skid plate. Have since put the skid plate back on so I cant tell if it drips out the weep hole very easy. Seems like I noticed over the whole season last year the coolant level dropped slightly. Is this a sign I need to be doing some service to the water pump? Thanks

  • scott_h

Posted March 23, 2005 - 06:02 AM

#2

Yes. The only way coolant can get to that weep hole is by leaking past the coolant seal that rides right behind the water pump impeller. Now is the time to replace the coolant seal, oil seal and impeller shaft. If you ignore it the coolant will eventually get by the oil seal and you’ll be making chocolate milk in your crankcase.

Scott

  • mountainriderWR400F

Posted March 23, 2005 - 06:27 AM

#3

check on the right side of the motor bottom of right radiator where both black hoses come into a (y) and there is a aluminum fitting with an o-ring usually looks like it is coming out of the weep hole at least worth a check

  • ETP

Posted March 23, 2005 - 07:01 AM

#4

At around 2000 miles, I haven't had any problems with my 03 pump yet, but I hear that coolant out of that weep hole is the indicator that the pump needs service. This is suppose to be a normal occurance after many miles.

  • 5valve

Posted March 23, 2005 - 07:41 AM

#5

...coolant seal, oil seal and impeller shaft. ....
Scott

are those three things a neccessity to replace or is it just a precaution and only one of those is blown, for instance coolant seal only

  • BC

Posted March 23, 2005 - 11:40 AM

#6

I had to replace the seals and impeller shaft on my 03' after about a 1000 miles. It's not a big deal. I think it was about $150.00 in parts and about 2-3 hours of my slow labor. Just follow the manual. :)

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  • 5valve

Posted March 23, 2005 - 12:17 PM

#7

I checked the parts and there is also a bearing involved, could be stressed to
time to check, I finally found my leakage problem...emptying coolant reservoair, dripping pump from cold bike only :)
paytime :)

  • scott_h

Posted March 23, 2005 - 05:43 PM

#8

are those three things a neccessity to replace or is it just a precaution and only one of those is blown, for instance coolant seal only


I view it as cheap insurance. $4 for each seal and impeller shaft is about $25. When you put it back together you know it's not going to leak.

  • snmhanson

Posted March 23, 2005 - 07:02 PM

#9

Yes. The only way coolant can get to that weep hole is by leaking past the coolant seal that rides right behind the water pump impeller. Now is the time to replace the coolant seal, oil seal and impeller shaft. If you ignore it the coolant will eventually get by the oil seal and you’ll be making chocolate milk in your crankcase.

Scott


I had a small puddle of coolant under my bike a little while ago and thought nothing of it. Now I think I will service the water pump as described here even though I've only got 200 miles on my bike. Looking in the manual I could not find a coolant seal. Is it the plain washer that is right next to the first oil seal? Also, I assume that both oil seals need to be replaced, correct?

On a possibly related note, my clutch has not been working lately when the bike has been sitting for a while. If the bike is in gear, cold and not running it will not move even with the clutch in. As soon as I start her up the clutch seems to work fine again and the bike seems to run fine. It has also recently been slightly harder to get into first gear than normal and the last time I started my bike it was difficult to start (had to kick it) and it ran a little funny with quite a bit of popping for the first minute or two. Could this be because some coolant has leaked into the oil and is causing these problems? I recently posted a seperate post about this but seeing this post is making me think that it could possibly be a leaky seal in the water pump. What should my next move be?

Matt

  • scott_h

Posted March 24, 2005 - 01:07 AM

#10

Matt,

The two oil seals are what need to be replaced. The "oil" seal on the impeller side is actually sealing the coolant from getting into the engine internals, thus my reference to a "coolant seal". The oil seal on the other side is keeping the engine oil from leaking around the impeller shaft and into the cooling system. The small space between the two seals forms a dry cavity. The weep hole penetrates into this cavity and is there to alert you when the seals begin to fail. It’s more typical that the seal on the impeller side will begin to leak before the oil seal on the engine side. If you catch it quickly enough, the bearing, which is inboard of the oil seal, will not normally be damaged. If in doubt, I would go ahead and replace the bearing, but you should be able do a reasonable visual inspection on it and decide if you need to replace it or not.

If you suspect coolant has leaked past the oil seal and into the engine, drain the oil. It doesn't take much antifreeze to turn the oil into a milky/soupy mess. If this is the case, fix the coolant leak and thoroughly flush the motor out. Unless you rebuild the engine, you’ll need to do some pretty frequent oil changes for a while before you'll be able to get all the residual coolant out of there.

Regarding the clutch issue; while you have the cover off for the water pump rebuild, go ahead and take the clutch apart and inspect it. Pay attention to the plates since the friction plate adjacent to the pressure plate is slightly different than the rest of the plates (at least they are on the 98 & 99 models). Check all the plates for glazing (overheating) and wear (measure the thickness and make sure they're in spec). Make sure the fingers on the clutch basket and splines on the inner hub that the plates ride in are not notched or grooved. If so, and the grooving is not too bad, you should be able to use a file to dress up the fingers. Measure the spring lengths too and make sure they’re in spec. Replace anything that's out of tolerance. In my opinion, the after market clutch kits (plates and springs) such as EBC are much cheaper than the OEM parts and are just as durable as the stock parts.

Hope this helps and good luck.
Scott

  • 5valve

Posted March 24, 2005 - 07:31 AM

#11

ive just received some prices from dealer for my 400

5GR-12458-00-00 SHAFT, IMPELLER----------34$
93109-11073-00 OIL SEAL-------------------6,30$
93102-12106-00 OIL SEAL (SD 12-22-5 HS)--7,50%
93306-00105-00 BEARING (B6001)-----------10$
-------------------------------------------------
58$





if shaft has no grooves, i presume there is no need to replace it :)

  • Jeremy Wright

Posted March 24, 2005 - 08:06 AM

#12

I had the same problem with the sticking clutch. The bike was new so I called the dealer to see if they could help me. He told me that the clutch plates dry off when it sits for a few days. After running the bike for a second, the plates lubricate and slip like they were designed to. If anyone knows that this is a false statement please reply, I will need to have some words with the dealer and have them fix this problem.

  • snmhanson

Posted March 24, 2005 - 08:15 AM

#13

Matt,

The two oil seals are what need to be replaced. The "oil" seal on the impeller side is actually sealing the coolant from getting into the engine internals, thus my reference to a "coolant seal". The oil seal on the other side is keeping the engine oil from leaking around the impeller shaft and into the cooling system. The small space between the two seals forms a dry cavity. The weep hole penetrates into this cavity and is there to alert you when the seals begin to fail. It’s more typical that the seal on the impeller side will begin to leak before the oil seal on the engine side. If you catch it quickly enough, the bearing, which is inboard of the oil seal, will not normally be damaged. If in doubt, I would go ahead and replace the bearing, but you should be able do a reasonable visual inspection on it and decide if you need to replace it or not.

If you suspect coolant has leaked past the oil seal and into the engine, drain the oil. It doesn't take much antifreeze to turn the oil into a milky/soupy mess. If this is the case, fix the coolant leak and thoroughly flush the motor out. Unless you rebuild the engine, you’ll need to do some pretty frequent oil changes for a while before you'll be able to get all the residual coolant out of there.

Regarding the clutch issue; while you have the cover off for the water pump rebuild, go ahead and take the clutch apart and inspect it. Pay attention to the plates since the friction plate adjacent to the pressure plate is slightly different than the rest of the plates (at least they are on the 98 & 99 models). Check all the plates for glazing (overheating) and wear (measure the thickness and make sure they're in spec). Make sure the fingers on the clutch basket and splines on the inner hub that the plates ride in are not notched or grooved. If so, and the grooving is not too bad, you should be able to use a file to dress up the fingers. Measure the spring lengths too and make sure they’re in spec. Replace anything that's out of tolerance. In my opinion, the after market clutch kits (plates and springs) such as EBC are much cheaper than the OEM parts and are just as durable as the stock parts.

Hope this helps and good luck.
Scott


Thanks for the great response :) . I will look into those things. Will it be obvious if any anit-freeze has gotten into my oil when I do my oil change and if not how do I determine if any leaked in? I suspect (or maybe just hope) that the anti-freeze has not gotten into my oil and the clutch is getting "vucuumed" together after the oil cools off as described on my other post (clutch not disengaging) since it works fine as soon as I start my bike. I'll probably pull it apart and check it as you described since I'll be halfway there when I rebuild my water pump anyway. If nothing else I'll learn about how the clutch works. Thanks again for the help.

Matt




 
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