just ordered the auto-clutch


43 replies to this topic
  • minibikedad

Posted March 23, 2005 - 06:39 AM

#21

Correct me if I'm wrong, but w/ Revloc, you not only get the auto clutch device, but a brand new billet clutch basket, discs, and plates. ie, the entire package.

Reklulse & EFM will ship out the auto clutch device only at those prices.

  • thumpasaurus

Posted March 23, 2005 - 10:50 AM

#22

Correct me if I'm wrong, but w/ Revloc, you not only get the auto clutch device, but a brand new billet clutch basket, discs, and plates. ie, the entire package. Reklulse & EFM will ship out the auto clutch device only at those prices.


The rekluse is just a replacement pressure plate from what I understand. I think that's good though. The more stock parts retained the better, IMO.

  • hurricane jonny

Posted March 23, 2005 - 11:48 AM

#23

I want the carb first and foremost..[/QUOTE]


Me too!

  • SMOKE

Posted March 23, 2005 - 06:14 PM

#24

Correct me if I'm wrong, but w/ Revloc, you not only get the auto clutch device, but a brand new billet clutch basket, discs, and plates. ie, the entire package.

Reklulse & EFM will ship out the auto clutch device only at those prices.



no the revloc you dont get friction plates and steel plates, just the basket, here is a pic of what they send youPosted Image

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted March 23, 2005 - 08:34 PM

#25

Revloc requires your stock clutch basket so they can modify it or they will send you a unit ready to install and you had to pay a deposit until they receive your stock clutch basket. I understand for some models they do not require your stock basket anymore (like the KX500). Revloc makes a great product just a bit pricey for me. You can't go wrong with a Revloc but niether can you with a Rekluse. :)

  • hurricane jonny

Posted March 29, 2005 - 02:02 PM

#26

If your gonna go that route get the rekluse z-start. It does the same thing for only $400 and it installs in about 1/2 hour.

  • SMOKE

Posted March 29, 2005 - 07:30 PM

#27

you get what you pay for...

  • BWB63

Posted March 29, 2005 - 09:22 PM

#28

I have the Rekluse and it's great for a trail rider that has time to make clean clutchless shifts but, it is not for the balls to the wall race rider. It sucks at this point and the owner is straight up about it. I have been waiting for the next generation Rekluse but, it hasn't shown up as promissed yet.

  • beer_studd_76

Posted March 30, 2005 - 08:36 PM

#29

it is not for the balls to the wall race rider.


please elaborate

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted March 30, 2005 - 08:52 PM

#30

I have the Rekluse and it's great for a trail rider that has time to make clean clutchless shifts but, it is not for the balls to the wall race rider. It sucks at this point and the owner is straight up about it. I have been waiting for the next generation Rekluse but, it hasn't shown up as promissed yet.


That doesn't even make sense since you can overide the auto-clutch if you retain your hand lever and shift exactly as you would without the auto-clutch. You still retain the big pluses of an auto-clutch. One of which is you don't have to use the clutch as you wheel slide into a turn and the bike will not die just pour the gas on as you need it.
:naughty:

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • thumpasaurus

Posted March 31, 2005 - 06:28 AM

#31

I have the Rekluse and it's great for a trail rider that has time to make clean clutchless shifts but, it is not for the balls to the wall race rider. It sucks at this point and the owner is straight up about it. I have been waiting for the next generation Rekluse but, it hasn't shown up as promissed yet.


I want to hear more about this too. especially what you mean by: "It sucks at this point and the owner is straight up about it".. I sucks how? :naughty:

I am (was) on the verge of buying. I am a trail rider and want it to ride tight/steep/technical spots but keep my 15-48 dual sport gearing. No racing (officially anyway :naughty: )

  • BWB63

Posted March 31, 2005 - 09:12 AM

#32

That doesn't even make sense since you can overide the auto-clutch if you retain your hand lever and shift exactly as you would without the auto-clutch. You still retain the big pluses of an auto-clutch. One of which is you don't have to use the clutch as you wheel slide into a turn and the bike will not die just pour the gas on as you need it.
:naughty:



You can not "override" the auto clutch! You can just add more spring tension allowing the pressure plate to disengage at a slightly higher rpm. There is no manual disengagement of the pressure plate. The next Rekluse will have a manual disengagement of the clutch. You can not shift "Exactly as you would without the auto clutch". The pressure plate on this Recluse does not move when you pull the clutch lever. If you are at an rpm higher then 3000 or so you can not make the clutch disengage. Travis Pastrana is having the same problem with the Rekluse on his supermotard. When you are on it and you need to drop two now there isn't enough time to be screwing with blipping the throttle and it still being locked up. It doesn't work here and Rekluse recognizes it. For you guys that do trail rides this would not be a problem but, you come blasting off a 4~5 foot drop off into a left turn and then up the other side of the wall to get out of the wash it dose not work at all if you are at race speed. You have to wait for the rpm's to drop before you make a shift with the clutch disengaged and I do not want to hit the brake that hard to shift.

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted March 31, 2005 - 10:25 AM

#33

You can not "override" the auto clutch! You can just add more spring tension allowing the pressure plate to disengage at a slightly higher rpm. There is no manual disengagement of the pressure plate. The next Rekluse will have a manual disengagement of the clutch. You can not shift "Exactly as you would without the auto clutch". The pressure plate on this Recluse does not move when you pull the clutch lever. If you are at an rpm higher then 3000 or so you can not make the clutch disengage. Travis Pastrana is having the same problem with the Rekluse on his supermotard. When you are on it and you need to drop two now there isn't enough time to be screwing with blipping the throttle and it still being locked up. It doesn't work here and Rekluse recognizes it. For you guys that do trail rides this would not be a problem but, you come blasting off a 4~5 foot drop off into a left turn and then up the other side of the wall to get out of the wash it dose not work at all if you are at race speed. You have to wait for the rpm's to drop before you make a shift with the clutch disengaged and I do not want to hit the brake that hard to shift.



What kind of bike is Pastrama ride?

When I installed my autoclutch I left all of the stock clutch parts in place except the pressure plate. Even the rod which releases the stock pressure plate was left in the motor. When I pull the clutch lever it does not just change the spring tension. I can have it in gear and rev it to 3000 rpm with the clutch lever pulled and the bike stays stationary. Is the XR650 different than what Pastrama is riding? Maybe I'm missing your point here but I was told by rekluse that by retaining my manual clutch lever I could override the auto-clutch preventing it from engaging. And that does appear to be how it works. The faster the rpm the harder the clutch pull at the lever because the clutch rod is having to push harder against the engaged pressure plate to release it.

  • BWB63

Posted March 31, 2005 - 12:51 PM

#34

None of this aplies to the new rekluse that is not out yet. (Well maybe some could have it, if they talked to Rekluse)
OldmanTime,
Yes, you left the rod in but, you changed the thrust bearing. The stock thrust bearing dose not work on the Rekluse. (In less you have the new one I don't have and hasn't been sent to anyone yet) The Rekluse pressure plate does not use springs and it does not move. (Your stock springs are not in the bike) It uses shims to space it out and the balls move the inside of the pressure plate in and out. When you pull in the clutch you are just adding tension to the plate pushing the balls out earlier. If you are just sitting there and rev the engine up with the clutch pulled you are keeping the balls from pushing out. Try it the other way! Rev the engine up (this will bush the balls out) and pull the clutch lever in and you can not push the balls back to release the pressure plate. You can do this in neutral. rev it up to 5,000 and pull the clutch in, it will not move, like it's stuck, now let off and see how long it takes to release. If you are above about 5,000 and in gear and you let off it is a long time before you will be at the 2,200~2,600 rpm that it has to be for the balls to move back. If you are moving fast you do not have the time for this to take place. Like I said, you are not moving the pressure plate when you pull the clutch lever (that is a fact), you are push the inner plate against the balls. When the balls push back in the clutch plates release. The owner at Rekluse knows this and if you will call him he will tell you the same thing. Pastrana runs a DRZ400 and that bike is has the same trouble as the BRP. The new Rekluse Z-start will use the stock clutch springs and will move the whole pressure plate when you pull the clutch lever. Then you will have the best of both worlds. In less you have one of these you are not releasing the pressure plate but, adding more pressure against the balls from pushing out. This does not hurt anything for those that trail ride, you would have lot's of time to wait for the balls to move back in. Making slow late shifts is not a problem. Most don't even shift down till you stop and shift all the way from fifth to first.

  • SMOKE

Posted April 05, 2005 - 06:04 PM

#35

:naughty: WELL FIRST RIDE REPORT............... :naughty:

first off....
HOLY F#CK IT IS A NEW BIKE... :D

ok now that that is off my chest. the revloc clutch system was a breeze to install and a breeze to get used to. the person who made the instruction could of used better grammer but hey good product exceeds all right. i rode about 30 miles at a snails pace just getting used to it before i was at race pace for the next 30 miles i was sliding into corners like johnny and out of them like steve. it was a great feeling to know in the back of your mind that the bike wont stall IF you stab that rear brake just that much too much it wont stall out and then you are screwed if it dont fire right back up... going up hills wow what a confidence boost, creap up hills never touching the clutch and make it up like a pro would. overall out of 10 it gets a 9 because the only draw back i see is no bump start but for all the other positive things about it this is a very small problem. gretproduct...well worht the price :D

mike 53-t

  • Old_Man_Time

Posted April 05, 2005 - 08:39 PM

#36

That all makes a lot of sense when you think about it. I still use my clutch to shift at speed and I don't have to try to hit the right rpm then. I understand your explanation and it does make sense but maybe the balls fall back into their groove fast enough so that the rod pushes the pressure plate up against the balls more decidedly than when you dont' use it. Cause it does have an effect. I pull the clutch in when I want to down shift and the bike is already compressioning. I pull the clutch to shift if I have really pushed the bike into higher rpms and I want to upshift. The effect is I can shift without the gears slamming. In the Desert 100 Poker Run we were moving pretty good and doing a lot of shifting at speed. Pulling the clutch does have an effect even if it is only to expedite the pressure against the balls more effectively than if you wait for the rpm to drop to a complete idle. I can see that your explanation is quite right as to the working of the autoclutch. I never really thought of it that way because I have always been able to ride as if the clutch were over riding the auto-clutch. I can be in second gear moving along and pull the clutch in rev the motor and pop the clutch with the same effect I would have with the stock clutch. At any rate your explanation is correct. The people at Rekluse used the expression override the clutch when we talked about retaining the clutch lever. I now know they were talking about the perceived effect not what was actually happening.

  • BWB63

Posted April 06, 2005 - 03:19 PM

#37

Like I said, it is only in full on conditions. Try to drop from fourth to second after a drop off. Or any higher rpm down shifting you just can't (it won't do it). You have to wait. The next generation clutch from Rekluse will but, now I can't get them to respond to my emails. I guess I'll have to call again.

  • beer_studd_76

Posted April 06, 2005 - 04:35 PM

#38

Like I said, it is only in full on conditions. Try to drop from fourth to second after a drop off. Or any higher rpm down shifting you just can't (it won't do it). You have to wait. The next generation clutch from Rekluse will but, now I can't get them to respond to my emails. I guess I'll have to call again.


the revloc on my 380 allows me to downshift from 5th to 1st if i so desired.

is that not the case on the XR?

  • SMOKE

Posted April 06, 2005 - 05:54 PM

#39

i think they are talking about the rekluse not the revloc, i can do the same as you...

  • qadsan

Posted April 06, 2005 - 07:30 PM

#40

the revloc on my 380 allows me to downshift from 5th to 1st if i so desired.

is that not the case on the XR?


This issue only happens when you're running ~5/8 to wide open throttle and you try to down shift from a high rear wheel speed under those conditions. If you're coming off a 4ft drop and you keep the throttle pinned as you come off and all of a sudden you have to shift down a gear or two in 1/10 of a second at a high engine RPM with a high wheel speed, you'll have difficulty doing so unless you wait for the engine RPaM to come down a bit which can take less than one second after letting off the throttle. If you're riding at WOT and jam on the rear brake as you let off the gas, you can downshift even quicker since rear wheel isn't loading the gearbox at that point.

I can downshift from 5th to 1st if I desire and the rear wheel will freewheel if I don't give the bike any throttle. It's like coasting at speed with the clutch lever pulled in. Once I blip my throttle, I'm locked in first and doing this at speed can float the valves and throw you over the bars.

If I'm riding WOT and need to immediately down shift, I jam on the brakes at the same time I'm pulling in my clutch lever while I'm off the gas for a fraction of a second and then rapidly downshift as opposed to rapidly power downshifting at a high engine & wheel speed without using any brakes. It generally takes less than one second before the engine RPM and or rear wheel speed drops enough to where I can blip the throttle for rapid & smooth downshifts. If I try to immediately downshift from a higher engine RPM (i.e. ~6000 RPM) with a high wheel speed without jamming on my rear brake, shifting can be very difficult and gets worse with increasing engine RPM, but it's easily something I can work around, especially riding off road. The hard core motard racers would be way more affected on this issue than the off road weekend warriors or off road racers in my opinion.

It's too easy to damage the gearbox when power downshifting at higher engine RPM with or without using the clutch and rapidly power downshifting the 650r from high engine RPM even with the stock clutch is much trickier than say a crf450r or cr250, etc. Watch the superbikers real close as they end a long straight and scream into a corner. Take note of their throttle wrist rapidly blipping the throttle as they rapidly down shift gear after gear and you'll hear the bike going vrooom...vrooom...vrooom, etc. They're not doing this to sound cool, but to match the engine speed to the rear wheel speed so the downshift happens under minimal load (easier on the gearbox). Mastering the timing of your downshifts while blipping the throttle (engine speed ~ rear wheel speed) will make downshifting easier with or without the z-start and and when you add in some rear braking, you can make quicker and smooth downshifts with a z-start equipped xr650r.





Related Content

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.