Probably a stupid question but..


4 replies to this topic
  • stink

Posted February 25, 2005 - 04:36 PM

#1

When installing l.e.d turn signals I know if I do not put an extra load on them the signal will flash fast. I think the law states that they must flash around 90 flashes per minute. I am not very concerned about the speed of the flash. The question is will having a fast flash damage the l.e.d? The reason I am using leds is because they are more efficient and therefore are less of a draw on the bikes (small) electrical system. Wouldn't using a resistor with them cause them to draw as much as a regular bulb? Thanks for any help. Cheers S.

  • 4mud

Posted February 25, 2005 - 05:22 PM

#2

Adding a resistor will slow them down, but then the current draw will equal that of a bulb. Some flasher manufactures make a unit designed forLEDs. It operates independant of load. This should fix your problem.

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  • Oldmxer

Posted February 26, 2005 - 10:39 AM

#3

In answer to your other question, NO a fast flash will not hurt an LED.

Leds can switch in milliseconds for years on electronic equipment. Just think of your hard drive light flickering. It is an LED.

But you also may not be able to see it going off if it is flickering too fast.

  • toyota_mdt_tech

Posted February 26, 2005 - 12:19 PM

#4

When installing l.e.d turn signals I know if I do not put an extra load on them the signal will flash fast. I think the law states that they must flash around 90 flashes per minute. I am not very concerned about the speed of the flash. The question is will having a fast flash damage the l.e.d? The reason I am using leds is because they are more efficient and therefore are less of a draw on the bikes (small) electrical system. Wouldn't using a resistor with them cause them to draw as much as a regular bulb? Thanks for any help. Cheers S.


Stink, if you use an LED bulb, you must install a load (resistor) to equal the total of the prevoius incandesent bulb. Other option is to get a flasher that is electronic and doest rely on a particular load. They do make them. Its almost counterproductive to install low consumption blinkers, then have to add a load to make them work. Puts you back to square one, but the advantage is the more durable bulb. But get the solid state flasher and have the best of both worlds!

  • stink

Posted February 26, 2005 - 11:02 PM

#5

Solid state flasher..... Do you have any brand/model names? I do not want to put a resistor in the system. Cheers S. I think I saw the appropriate flasher here: http://www.customdyn...adequalizer.htm
Part: (6104-00) Universal Flasher
Is this what I need? Is there a less expensive model out there? Thanks for the help! Cheers S.




 
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